Year 2004

Date:
12/31/2004
Time:
10:51 PM

Hi, I am a retired American Airlines Flight engineer instructor. When I was working at LAX between the years 1966 to 1968 I worked in the 707 simulator with a former

B-26 pilot by the name of Stan Clark. Stan was an AAL captain and 707 pilot instructor at the time. I used to get him to tell me war stories from time to time – but all

I can remember after 37 years is that at one time or another he flew “Mild and Bitter”. After I moved to DFW I no longer had contact with Stan, but If he is still

around he probably could be contacted vis the AAL retired pilot group – The Gray Eagle Association ( I have no contact info for them). Harold Davey

Date:
12/31/2004
Time:
4:08 PM

Greetings, My father William Henry Wishard III a 2nd Lt. who died on May 25, 1945. He was killed overseas and was a crew member on a B-26. The following information was

taken from his Pilot and Crew Member Physical Record Card:

Army Serial No. XXXX451
Examinations – Qualified for flying
Class I
Date 5/2/44
Signature of Flight Surgeon- (unreadable)
Station – (this was cut out)

Do you have any record or information on my father or his group?

Thank you for any information you can give me. He was shipped overseas two weeks before I was born and now my 12 year old son and I am researching this together as a

way to pass on the memory of my father.

Thank you in advance you assistance would be greatly appreciated.

William “Bill” Wishard

Date:
12/29/2004
Time:
7:38 AM

James D. Pascoe, Marauder Man
394th B. Grp
587th B. Sqd
Served April 1943 to Nov. 1945

After Armament School at Lowery and Flex Gunnery school near Fort Meyer, I was assigned to the 394 at Kellogg Field, and joined the Ted Kubala crew as tail gunner.

After being shot down on April 21st 1944 I managed to evade capture till May 9th when I and two other American airmen, John Blangio of Boston and George Gannister of

Birmingham Ala. were led into a trap in Lille and captured. As for the other members of the crew: Theodore E. Kubala, pilot: William G. Jones, copilot: and John A.

Debell, nav/bombardier went down with the plane. Flight Engineer Sylvester W Schrieber, and radio man, George J Mahin were captured immediately.

Date:
12/27/2004
Time:
5:56 PM

Marauder Man Kenneth A. Schell – From his Purple heart citation papers, he was in the 387th Bombardment Group (M), 556th bombardment Squadron (M). He is listed as an

Aerial-Gunner and was under the command of Brigadier General Anderson, Richard C Saunders, Brig Gen, Chief of Staff, signed by Arthur W Egan., 1st Lt, Air Corps,

Adjutant. His discharge lists him as an airplane mechanic, gunner 748. His battles and campaigns listed are Normandy; Rhineland. He was injured 12 August 1944, place

unavailable. As an addition to 556th Bomb Sq (M), there are comments 123,131, &161 Hq IX BC44; GO’s 23,&33/44, 6& 40/45, Hq 9th BD. Maybe someone who understands

military language will have insight into the significance of these notations. I would like to find more information if possible. I have a photo of the plane and crew

that flew it. The number on the plane is 1891. The crew listed is as follows: “Wild Bill” Moriarity, pilot; Jess Wilkes; Clarence E Bergand; Kenneth A. Schell,

engineer; Doyle K. Grant, radio man; Charles F. Salas, gunner. This photo is dated Mar 23, 1944. I am guessing it was taken in the states as his date of departure to

ETO was 15 Apr 44. Will any of this information be helpful in finding another crew member or relative of a crew member. I have been told they flew 87 missions and all

six flew all missions and all returned. Thanks for your interest. I’m just the baby sister who heard stories and who now has a few of his memories. It soon will be five

years since his death. I know it is a little late for me to be searching but I’m willing to give it a try. Margaret Rose (Margie) Schell Frazier.

Date:
12/24/2004
Time:
10:59 AM

My dad, Theodore V. Harwood, flew with the 323rd on their mission on Dec. 23rd. This is the letter he wrote sixty years ago today. Take care, Ted Harwood, II.

“12/24/44 (Christmas Eve): Dear folks, I received your swell gifts yesterday and last night we all played pop’s ring toss game, I opened the other presents tonight

before chow. and all were very nice. I don’t know how to thank you as it means so much to receive things from home. I have had no mail from home for seven days, but I

know it’s just the mail tie up.

I have 18 missions now and the last one was a little rough, in fact the roughest one we have had. I saw enough to make those old pictures, like “Hells’ Angles” look

sick. But, the Germans took the worst of the beating.

It has been really cold here the last few days. All of the water pools are frozen over and the ground stays frozen all day. Our water system is no-operational now too,

all frozen up. No snow as yet, but heavy frost every morning and the ground is all while until about 11:00 every morning.

I would very much like to be home with you folks tonight, but know you will have a good time. It is 7:00 PM here and only 11:00 A.M. there. I suppose there’s not to

much activity going on in the house as yet. Nor is there much here. Most of the boys are pretty tired and are doing a lot of thinking.

I want to thank you once again for all of the lovely gifts I received and I hope that we can all be together for our next Christmas. All my love Ted.”

Date:
12/23/2004
Time:
3:31 PM

Marauder Men – Sgt. J. A. Hodesh, Cpl. James. H. Skinner, Cpl. John Quirk – Daily Hampshire Gazette, Wednesday, July 26, 1944. Mild And Bitter, Marauder B-26 Marauder

Date:
12/23/2004
Time:
2:23 PM

Sixty years ago today, thirty-six B-26’s of the 397th Bomb Group took off in the snow to bomb the Eller Railroad bridge. Fighter escort missed the rendezvous, leaving

the group to continue on to the bridge alone. The group was attacked by three waves of 15 German fighters. They encountered heavy flak over the target area. The bridge

was bombed using GEE. The bridge was hit and put out of use. Leaving the target area they were again attacked by German fighters. Eleven B-26’s did not return from that

mission. The group received a Distinguished Unit Citation for the mission.

Today, American servicemen and women are fighting halfway around the world again. Let us remember the sacrifices of those men 60 years ago and the sacrifices of our

friends and neighbors today.

God bless them all,
Wynn Anderson

Marauder Man – Andy Anderson

Wynn,
Sixty years ago today the following losses were suffered by B26 units bombing tactical targets in support of the Allied armies.

1st.PFF Squadron – 3
17th.Bomb Group – 1
320th.Bomb Group – 1
322nd.Bomb Group – 2
323rd.Bomb Group – 2
387th.Bomb Group – 5
391st Bomb Group – 16
397th.Bomb Group – 11

A sum total of 41 B26’s being missing in action in addition to which many returned so badly damaged as to be of no further combat use. Your nation today does indeed owe

a deep debt of gratitude to the many young men who sacrificed their lives that day to ensure that a bloody war was brought to a swift conclusion. Remember they were so

young and they gave their all for peace.

On that day 60 years ago the weather was very bad, and the fighter escorts had an almost impossible task of making rendezvous with the bombers. The two Groups who

suffered the most the 391st and the 397th flew without escort. In any case the entire scenario was in utter confusion both on the ground and in the air.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
12/22/2004
Time:
10:35 PM

Marauderman’s Name: Vernon L. Heim
Bomb Group: 391st
Bomb Squadron: 573rd
Years in service: 4+
Graduation Class:
Class Location:
Comments: I’m just now starting more serious research into the history of what my grandfather did. He was a flight engineer and crew chief for a B-26 nicknamed “Pink’s

Lady” (NOT Pink’s Lady II…that I know of.) A common Internet excerpt I’ve found is “Still going strong with seventy-eight missions to her credit, one of the ships

nicknamed “Pink’s Lady”, was the most durable Marauder in the Group. The plane had never aborted through mechanical failure, testifying to the engineering skill of her

ground crew and T/Sgt Vernon L Heim, Crew Chief, of Schuylkill Haven Pa. ” This quote relates to Mission #100, June 20, 1944, on Predefin and La Belle Hotesse, France.

He was listed on a single flight plan I was able to dig up on the Internet from MacDill AFB, Florida. His enter date was 4-21-1943, and mil number XXXX1609. To my

knowledge, he spent time in Myrtle Beach, Florida, Greenland, England, France and Germany- ending his USAAF career at Olmstead AFB, Harrisburg/Middletown, PA. I am

seeking personal stories, mission details, and mostly- a photo of the nose art or numbers for this particular plane. I’d like to relate what he and others did during

the war, to my young Son. Please feel free to contact me. Thank you to the B26.COM site and those who served to defend us!

Thanks very much,
Shawn
Date:

12/22/2004
Time:
10:27 PM

Hello: My father, the late Edward W. Davis was a member of the 452nd Bomb Sq and arrived in England the day after the disaster at Ijmuiden. He was a pilot and flew 76

combat missions for which he was awarded 2 DFCs and 13 DAM’s. His best friend was Roy Edge, with whom he trained and served. Dad was the commander of the Lt Edge’s

honor guard when he was buried at the American Cemetery in England. Edge was later re-buried in his hometown in Georgia. My father retired as a Lt Col from the USAF in

1965 and became the Director of the Arkansas Public Service Commission and later the President of the Arkansas Telephone Association.

He died in 1991.

Philip

Date:
12/21/2004
Time:
7:38 AM

I recently was very pleased to discover your web site. I thought perhaps it would help me learn a little more about my brother Floyd’s plane and the crews experiences.

Floyd was with the 391st BG, 573rd BS and the plane was 42-107841, named Little Pink Panties. Sorry to say Floyd has recently died. I met the entire crew at their

reunion in Tampa, Florida in 1988. I am writing to ask how I might contact persons who have submitted inputs to your web site. I would like to provide some information

to those who had any ties to the plane, Little Pink Panties. Example: Entry 10/14/2002, 12:53:51 PM. Johnnie F. Jones states that he flew missions in “Little Pink

Panties”. On April 16th, he doesn’t remember which plane they flew in but their plane took a direct hit and they had to bail out. It wasn’t Little Pink Panties because

I had found during my previous research that she had sustained flak damage on March 25, 1945 and crash landed. The entry of 10/12/2003, 5:54 PM confirms that. Again in

entry 7/7/2002, 3:41:12 PM , the son of E. Z. Rice is searching for information about the plane his farther was in during a mid-air collision and subsequent ditching on

25 August 1944. On that date, it couldn’t have been Little Pink Panties. I also would like to contact Terry Marines Rogers whose father was the bombardier of Little

Pink panties. I’d tell her that my brother Floyd, another member of that crew, has passed on and the only one I know of who is still with us is the pilot, Hop Cassiday.

Sincerely,
Herman J. May

Herman,
Your identity of “Little Pink Panties” is correct 42-107841 coded T6-A and its loss in a crash-landing caused by severe flak damage. Elmer Z Rice was not flying

“Little Pink Panties” when he was in a mid air collision and his B26 ditched at sea off the Channel Islands. When Johnnie F Jones was shot down he had been transferred

to another Group and Squadron the 387th.BG 559th Bomb Squadron.

Regards,
Trevor J Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
12/20/2004
Time:
10:38 PM

Marauderman’s Name: William C. Reynolds
Bomb Group: 386th
Bomb Squadron: 555th
Years in service: 1942-1968
Graduation Class: 42-J
Class Location: Avon Park
Comments: My father was a pilot in the 555th of the 386th. He was shot down in April 1944 and spent a year in Stalag Luft III before escaping from a March in ’45. If

anyone could provide information about him and those events it would be appreciated.

The real reason for this post is: I have an authentically restored Stearman PT-17 (won Best PT-17 at the annual National Stearman Fly-in) painted in the colors when my

dad was in Primary at Mira Loma in 1942. I would be honored to give rides to any WW2 Marauder Man of the 386th Bomb Group (M).

The airplane is Florida. I am a former USAF pilot and current airline pilot. My family (including 2 strong sons) will help crew and can help get anyone who is less than

fully mobile into the cockpit.

Terry Reynolds

Date:
12/18/2004
Time:
1:40 PM

BASTOGNE, Belgium – World War II-era jeeps and trucks rumbled through this town Saturday in ceremonies marking the 60th anniversary of the deadliest battle in American

history, the Battle of the Bulge. Veterans from across the United States returned to find Bastogne covered in snow, just as it was that bitter cold December of 1944.

The town of 14,000 took the brunt of the six-week battle that raged across the Ardennes hills of southern Belgium and Luxembourg. “The American veterans who have

returned 60 years later to the battle site represent those who gave their lives on our soil, so that today we can live free,” Bastogne Mayor Philippe Collard said in

French at a memorial honoring U.S. General George S. Patton. Read more…

Date:
12/16/2004
Time:
6:59 AM

Re B26 Guest Book Entry 8-17-01 re Michael Farmer Groom, Capt. I very much like to contact the writer of this entry: Michael Groom, Jr. I was a navigator/bombardier and

flew many missions with Capt. Groom. I can supply some pictures data, etc.

Sincerely, Russell P. Hall

Mr. Hall, thank you for the offer to help me tell the Marauder Man story – few people understand the concept behind B26.COM.

Date:
12/16/2004
Time:
4:14 AM

My name is David B. McDonald, I am the nephew of Lieutenant Albert G. Burger Jr., who died in 1944 in a raid over France. I have received many items that belonged to

him from my mother who has passed them on to me. She has given me many newspaper clippings and 3 of his pilot’s log books. I have seen several names of planes

associated with his name but am not sure what plane or planes he flew the most or which plane he was flying when it was shot down. One newspaper article says that there

were 4 parachutes seen leaving the plane. The story I got from my mother was that oil from the engine was on him and he burned all the way down. I think he lived for

another 3 weeks in a hospital in France before finally succumbing to his burns.

I would like to known if anyone knows him and can tell me something about his life, his plane, his personality, and if there were any survivors of this crash. I noticed

his name mentioned in missions 39, 81 and 82. I am becoming increasingly interested in the history of my ancestors of WWII. I would appreciate any correspondence on

this subject. Thank you all for your sacrifices and may God Bless…

Sincerely,
David

David,
Lt Burger was flying B26 41-34989 YA-T “Rocks Off” of the 555th Bomb Squadron when he was shot down on June 12th 1944. If you would care to let us see scans of any

photographs you have we will try to identify them for you.

Regards,
Trevor J Allen
historian b26.com

Guest book inquiry December 16, 2004 by David McDonald: Subject: Lt. Albert Burger.

I saw your inquiry regarding your uncle Albert G. Burger, Jr. He was a B-26 pilot in the 555th Bomb Squadron, 386th Bomb Group. He flew his first mission with the Group

on August 27, 1943, (Group mission number 009) and his last mission on June 12, 1944 was Group mission number 205. You can read about some of the missions he flew as

listed: 009, 013, 015, 022, 023. On September 22nd he was assigned to fly an extra plane which as it turned out was not needed. Then he flew on mission 027, 029, we

lost the Cox crew on that one, and I was wounded by flak. Mission numbers: 032, 039, 055, 092, 113, and 205 when he was shot down. Your uncle’s crew returned the U.S.

in late spring of 1944. He stayed on in England and married an English bride.

Monday, June 12, 1944 The Group was briefed to fly a bombing mission to a marshalling yard target located at Bretigny-sur-orge, France. This would be a late afternoon

effort and the second mission of the day for the 386th Group. Your uncle was flying a plane named, “ROCKS OFF” 134989 YA-, he was number six in the low flight in the

second box of eighteen ships. At approximately 1800 hours the Group neared a place named Lillebonne on the way into enemy territory. Heavy type flak began bursting

within the formation while flying at 10,000 feet.

One flak shell exploded beneath the cockpit of your uncle’s plane, the fragmentation tore the forward fuselage to ribbons setting the maze of hydraulic lines located in

the nose wheel well under the cockpit on fire. A witness reported seeing somebody falling from the ship, that probably was your uncle. Another report stated that

immediately after the hit, the plane swerved to the right, narrowly missing a collision with the number five plane in the low flight. Then the ship rolled over twice,

went into a dive approximately for 3,000 feet, then leveled off for a few seconds. At that point the radioman Staff Sergeant John H. Nekervis was able to bail out from

a waist window.

The plane floated a bit as something in the ship blew up, at that point it went into a spin until crashing into the ground and exploding. Staff Sergeant Nekervis while

hanging in his parachute saw the plane crash and heard the explosion, he came down very near his plane. Four of the crew were killed in the crash. Your uncle was found

still strapped in his parachute and was taken to a hospital where he died from severe burns a few weeks later. Nekervis received small cuts from underbrush on a later

date while attempting to elude some German soldiers. He became a P.O.W. Five of the crewmembers were on the same crew, however that day your uncle was their pilot.

Members of the downed aircraft were 1st Lt. Albert G. Burger, Jr. pilot, 2nd Lt. Warren F. Lodge, Jr. co-pilot, Sergeant Stanley S. Kondak bombardier, Staff Sergeant

Morris L. Samuelson engineer, Staff Sergeant Leon F. McGonigle tail gunner, all lost their lives due to enemy action. Tech Sergeant John H. Nekervis radioman managed to

survive the war. Check out my web page listed below for more stories about the 386th Bomb Group.

Sincerely, Chester P. Klier—Historian, 386th Bomb Group

Date:
12/15/2004
Time:
6:37 AM

My name is Larry Fuller. I am the nephew of William Bower, who was killed 60 years ago on 12/23/44 near Demarath Germany. 397th Bomb Group, 599th Bomb Squadron, Draggin

Lady Airplane, Mont Stephenson Pilot.

Does anyone have a current email address for Herman-Josef Stolz who did all the wonderful research on this crew and the others lost on this tragic date? I would like to

thank him for his work and hope we’ll all pause for a moment of remembrance on the 23rd. Thank you.

Date:
12/14/2004
Time:
7:05 PM

Lt. Warren H Butterfield. Bombardier, 387th BG, 558th BS. Victory Bulletin Board Program, June 19, 1945. Radio Station KFPY 920 kc 5000W, Spokane, WA
Date:

12/13/2004
Time:
6:54 PM

My dad, Calvin Miller (who is still living and in good health), served with the 344th and the 397th in WWII. Dad was a B-26 Tail Gunner and was credited with 51

missions. I have enjoyed looking at your website and all of the pictures and information. We have several pictures of my dad, B-26 aircraft, etc that we could send via

e-mail if you are accepting such. I would love to have some of his information on your website.

Thanks,
Bob Miller

Bob – you’re welcome to add whatever you want to your dad’s dedication page.

Date:
12/12/2004
Time:
6:16 PM

Marauderman’s Name: Robert Lee Pocan
Bomb Group: 320th
Bomb Squadron: 444th
Years in service: 42-45
Graduation Class: 43
Class Location: Carlsbad, New Mexico?
Comments: I am the son of Robert L Pocan, Sr. After the war, my dad went to work for Pacific Telephone in the San Francisco bay area. He started out as an installer

lineman, and eventually became a Special Agent for the company’s security department. He was managing their San Jose office when he passed away in 1974.

I would like to get in touch with Don Round, below, and any other aircrew who may have flown with or known my dad in Sardinia or elsewhere. I have a small collection of

my dad’s snapshots and records to share.

Thanks for the great website,
Bob Pocan, Jr.

Date:
12/10/2004
Time:
8:25 PM

I am proud to say my father, now deceased, was a Marauder Man. His name is Charles C. Grudnicki and his plane was called “Tobacco Road”. If anyone can provide any

information or pictures of the crew, plane, or of him personally, we would be deeply grateful. My father was the most patriotic man I have ever known and I am thrilled

to have found this tribute to all the Marauder Men.

Thank you,
Charlene Grudnicki Ferguson.

Dear Charlene,
Your father served with the 449th Bomb Squadron 322nd Bomb Group. “Tobacco Road” was flown from the United States to England by the following crew:

Pilot – 1.Lt Dwight L Morrison, XXXX451
Copilot – 2.Lt William G Mills, XXXX031
Navigator – 2.Lt Howard L Erickson, XXXX026
Engineer – S/Sgt Charles C Grudnicki, XXXX934
M/Sgt – James E Byers, XXXX572

On arrival at Bury St Edmunds this B26 was transferred to the 451st Bomb Squadron and later renamed “Piecemaker”.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
12/10/2004
Time:
5:02 AM

Marauder Man: Elmer Hansard
9th Air Force
Bomb Group: 391
Bomb Squadron: 573
Yrs: 44-45
Class: 1944
Location: MS or AL (?)
Flight Crew:
Pilot: 1st Lt William Louse III
Co-Pilot: 1st Lt Melvin Reeves
Bombardier: 1st Lt Robert Schmidt
Engineer: S Sgt Robert McNeil
Radio Opp: T Sgt Ed Mclaughten
Tail gunner: S Sgt Elmer Hansard

I am writing for my grandfather, his b26 was called the Lilly Commando. I love talking to him about his experiences in the war. If you have any information about the

Lilly Commando, then please contact me. I would love to get in touch with some of his crew members.

He flew 69 missions. His plane was shot on D-Day by a sniper on the Caen canal bridge, and they successfully landed in Hastings, England.

Greg Hansard
Date:

12/9/2004
Time:
4:45 PM

My name is Hal Winstell. My father was Henry C. Winstell, born, raised and died in New Orleans, LA. He was part of the 320th B.G, 442 B.S. He passed away 10/1/1978

after 30 beautiful years of marriage with my mother. From stories I listened to as a kid growing up in the 1950’s and hungry to learn about anything that flew or flies,

I learned that my dad was a crew chief on a B-26 that he always referred to as the ‘Skeleton Duck.’ It seems that the B.G. insignia was Donald Duck running with a bomb

under his arm and this was painted on all the B-26’s in the group or squadron. Evidently some enterprising crew member painted over parts of the duck insignia and the

remnants looked like duck bones. The number on the tail of that plane was 118056. I am herewith attaching copies of the only four photos we ever had. The backs of the

photos all say they’re form 1943. I would love to see these on your great web-site. My dad is in all photos. He is the first man (tallest) on the left of the group

standing in the back row. He is standing slightly to the right of the starboard engine, under the prop in the big group composite photo.

I would really love to hear form anyone who knew my dad or anything about the aircraft. Thanks for a great site. I’m going to get more familiar with it!

Thank you!
Hal Winstell

Date:
12/7/2004
Time:
10:30 PM

My grand father Jean Annez de Taboada was a B-26 pilot during world war two. He flew with the South African Air Force 12th Squadron one of his planes name was “S” for

the saint. It would be great to get more info and maybe even a few photos. Please reply to see if possible.

Thank you very much,

From Alex Annez

Date:
12/7/2004
Time:
7:29 AM

I am looking for anyone who may have served with 1st Lt. Romeo Farese from Watertown Massachusetts. He was killed on 11 December 1944 in a B-26 crash in France. He was

in the 451st Bomb Group. I am endeavoring to have an intersection renamed FARESE SQUARE in honor of him and his younger brother Jessie who died in France as an

infantryman. I am also looking for any photographs of him. Any help would be appreciated. Art Napolitano

The purpose of this letter is to propose that the intersection of Main and Gleason Streets be named Farese Square in honor of two brothers who gave their lives in World

War II. Both were raised and educated in Watertown. The family home was located on Gleason Street. Both volunteered for duty in 1942 and both lost their lives within 5

months of each other in 1944. The following information is provided to assist the Town Council in rendering its decision on this proposal.

Pvt. Jessie J. Farese
Born: June 8, 1922
Entered Service: October 28, 1942
Unit: 329th Infantry Regiment 83rd Infantry Division
Died: July 14, 1944
Place of casualty: France
Place of final internment: Danville Military Cemetery, Danville, VA

1st Lt. Romeo S. Farese
Born: April 30, 1919
Entered Service: January 3, 1942
Unit: 34th Troop Carrier Sq. 9th Troop Carrier Cmd. 9th AAF 451st Bomb Sq. 99th Bomb Gp. (M) 9th Army Air Force
Died: December 11, 1944
Place of casualty: France
Place of final internment: Danville Military Cemetery, Danville, VA

Date:
12/7/2004
Time:
7:16 AM

Je suis Français et je recherche sur les chutes d’avion dans mon département.

Le 8 juillet 1944 lors du bombardement du château de RIBEAUCOURT (QG Allemand) le BG 322 a perdu 9 avions:

B26 42-107627 MACR 6622
B26 42-107870 MACR 6620
B26 42-107816 MACR 6624
B26 42-95970 MACR 6625
B26 42-107695 MACR 6621
B26 42-107680 MACR 6623
B26 41-31814 MACR 6626
B26 42-107591 MACR 6627
B26 41-18276 MACR 6628

A ma connaissance 3 de ces avions sont tombés dans mon département à : AUTHEUX, TALMAS, BOURDON Je recherche l’équipage et le MACR de chaque avion.

Dans l’attente de votre réponse, je vous remercie de l’aide que vous pouvez m’apporter.

Bien amicalement

A poor translation:
I am French and I seek on the falls of plane in my department. July 8, 1944 at the time of the bombardment of the castle of RIBEAUCOURT (German HQ) the BG 322 lost 9

planes:

B26 42-107627 MACR 6622
B26 42-107870 MACR 6620
B26 42-107816 MACR 6624
B26 42-95970 MACR 6625
B26 42-107695 MACR 6621
B26 42-107680 MACR 6623
B26 41-31814 MACR 6626
B26 42-107591 MACR 6627
B26 41-18276 MACR 6628

My knowledge 3 of these planes fell into my department to: AUTHEUX, TALMAS, BOURDON . I seek the crew and the MACR of each plane. In waiting of your answer, I thank you

for the assistance which you can bring to me. Sincerely

Date:
12/6/2004
Time:
10:21 PM

Hi. My grandfather flew with a B26 and the only information I have is that he was a Pathfinder. His name was Oliver Lee McCaskill. He passed about two years ago and I

am looking for any information about his service to our country. I’d like to hear from anybody who can tell me anything about him. He was from Leland Mississippi.

Emmett,
Your grandfather was originally with the 553rd.Bomb Squadron 386th.Bomb Group and was transferred with the rest of his crew to the 1st Pathfinder Squadron (Provisional)

February 14th 1944. The crew were as follows:

1.Lt Gilbert Howe, XXXX586, Pilot
F/O Olever L McCaskill, XXXX565, Co-Pilot
1.Lt Nathan E Offenhiser, XXXX191, Navigator
1.Lt Warren B Hinchee, XXXX665, Bombardier
T/Sgt Jack C Darby, XXXX616, Radio/Gunner
S/Sgt Eugene G Godziewcki, XXXX799, Engineer/Gunner
S/Sgt Edward T Kozlowski, XXXX842, Tail Gunner

The crew flew its first mission April 18th, 1944 when it led the 386th Bomb Group to Calais, France, but due to the radar going out of action the mission was abandoned.

Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Hello Emmett, saw your request in the B-26 guest book concerning your grandfather Oliver Lee McCaskill. He was a member of the Lieutenant Howe crew. Your grandfather

was a co-pilot. The name of their plane was HARD LUCK 131610 AN-P.
The Howe crew flew on the 386th B.G. diversion mission number 3. They flew on the following combat missions with the Group: 003, 004, 005, 008, 010, 011, 012, 013, 014,

016, 020, 022, 027, and on a recalled mission September 26, 1943. They also flew on mission number 054, 092 (missions 92.1 & 92.2), that was February 8, 1944. On

February 14, 1944 they were transferred to The 1st Pathfinder Squadron, Provisional.

The Howe crew had nicknames for each of the crew: Lt. Howe, the pilot was known as Doc. Co-pilot F/O McCaskill was known as Runt. Radioman T/Sgt. Darby was called

Junior. Bombardier/Navigator Lt. Offenhiser was Nate. Engineer S/Sgt. Godziecki was called Gus. Tail gunner S/Sgt. Kozlowski was called Eddie.

You can read about the above listed missions the Howe crew flew on–go to my web page, this is by no means a complete list of their combat flights, but there is enough

for you to get an idea of how things were at that time. You can also click on, Formation Diagrams regarding the above mission numbers to see where they flew in the

formation on any given day. My web page address is shown below.

Chester P. Klier—Historian, 386th B.G.

Date:
12/6/2004
Time:
10:16 PM

To anyone who served or knew men who were in the 394th group nicknamed – “The Bridge Busters”. My father was 1/Lt. Herchel E. Palmer, pilot. His crew is as follows:

1/Lt. David Lawton
S/Sgt. Andrew Lynch, Jr.
S/Sgt. Richard Aylward
S/Sgt. George Wolff. (585th Squadron).

They were part of the 394th Bomb Group, 98th Bomb Wing, 9th Bomb Division, 9th Air Force.

On December 2, 1944, my father and his crew were on a bombing mission over the area of Saarbrucken (spelling), Germany. Bad weather was a factor on the return flight

and they were directed to bases in France and Belgium. The plane crashed somewhere in France and all were killed immediately except for S/Sgt. George Wolff. He died of

injuries of December 10, 1944.

My name is Sylvia Work. I would like to hear from anyone who served with these men or a family member.

Sylvia,
The 394th Bomb Group lost ten B26’s on December 2nd 1944 due either to bad weather or running out of fuel. Your father’s B26 crashed near Guise, France.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
12/5/2004
Time:
8:55 PM

My name is Scott Clemens and I am conducting research on Lt. Clint Castleberry, Jr., who was killed when his B26G, 44-67866, was lost off of the coast of Africa on

November 7, 1944. I have obtained a copy of MACR 9925, which details the search for 44-67861 and 44-67866, both lost on the same date. The documentation includes orders

from the 1103d AAF Base Unit Caribbean Division, ATC, which seem to detail the ferrying flights for seven B26G’s. I have not been able to find any information on where

the aircraft were headed or what happened to them. I am obviously most interested in 44-67866, but the others are:

44-67859
44-67862
44-67863
44-67854
44-67853
43-34575

The MACR indicates that the two aircraft lost on 11/07/44 left five minutes apart from Roberts Field and were not flying in formation.

Any information is greatly appreciated.

Scott

Scott,
The B26’s you note were all destined for delivery to the Free French Air Force, and would have been delivered to Rabat in Morocco. Where the USAAF crews would go to

thereafter is open to surmise. By this time both the 9th.AAF and the 1st Tactical Air Force were operating from European bases. If you have the MACR then you probably

have all the information available. Unless there is an eyewitness account I cannot see any further avenues of approach.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
12/2/2004
Time:
11:23 PM

My name in Jason Robinson. I am a Cadet First Class in AFROTC. My grandfather is the late Capt. Thomas A. Best (B-26 Pilot). When I was young I attended a 454 BS

reunion with him. I was wondering how I can contact any of the remaining members of this Squadron. I know of one of the gentlemen in particular because of his book;

Gen. John Moench. I will be receiving my commission in August. My grandfather was going to commission me. Since he has passed, it would mean a great deal to me if I

could contact one of the Marauder Men he flew with and be commissioned by him? Any help or advice you can give me on this subject would be greatly appreciated.

Respectfully,
C1C Jason M. Robinson

Date:
12/1/2004
Time:
10:21 PM

William Fred Cox Jr., Marauder Man, 552nd Bomb Squadron, 386th Bomb Group

Date:
11/30/2004
Time:
10:00 PM

I’m one of the few survivors. I was a navigator in the original 451st at MacDill in 1942. I flew 55 combat missions over Europe before the invasion was hit and crash

landed on coast of England and spent several months in hospitals recovering. I am a widower after 58 years of a wonderful marriage. Would like to hear from old squadron

mates. Thank you, IRV SANOW

Date:
11/30/2004
Time:
5:26 PM

My uncle was CPT Albert Momenee, 386th, I believe the 554th. Would like to confirm with roster if available. Was not a pilot or crew member, believe in mission

planning. Any info about him would be appreciated.

Also need a thread for bombing missions for the following dates:
13 Apr 44 Namur
7 May 44 La Pernelle/Barfluer
24 Mar 45 Dorsten
26 Mar 45 Wurzburg

Thanks ahead of time.

LT Hank Deskewies
TNSG

Listed in 386th BG roster as First Lieutenant Momenee, A.W.; 386th Group Headquarters:
Mission 147: 13 April 1944 Namyr M/Y
Mission 168: 7 May 1944 Barfleur Parnalle C/G
Mission 384: 24 Mar 1945 Dorsten CC
Mission 386: 26 Mar 1945 Wurzburg M/Y

Regards,
Alf Egil Johannessen

Date:
11/30/2004
Time:
7:00 AM

Found your great web site, but maybe someone can help me? My Dad was Tech/Sgt. Joseph Burgmann and he was assigned on B-26 In World War II and flown missions over

Germany. He passed away on August 1979, but I never knew what Squadron he was in. Can anyone help or know how I can go about finding this information? Thank You.

Thank you for your enquiry to b26.com but with no Group or Squadron ID to go on it is almost impossible to find details on your father. If you have a photograph of your

father by a B26 then we will be able to identify his unit. From there we can probably find out what he did.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

I found a Pvt-T/Sgt Joseph G. Burgmann Jr in 323rd BG 456th BS (roster in Gen. John Moench’s book)…had some faint memory of having seen this name in that list.

Best regards from Norway,
Alf Egil Johannessen

Date:
11/30/2004
Time:
3:12 AM

Any idea where “air field #9” in North Africa was located? If I can find the location Lawrence Kreissler was at it in N. Africa it would help piece several things

together during the period after he was shot down, captured by the Germans and then returned by the Australians. Thanks again. Ken

Date:
11/29/2004
Time:
10:17 PM

I just read the 11/27/04 11:38 PM entry by the son of John B. Perry (and John Perry, too) who has documented his dad’s experiences in the 394th BG, 587 BS. He also has

photos of crews of the 587th, some with names.

My name is Jean Davis Bradfield, 587th BS, 394th BG, and a good friend of mine, Lt. Leslie N. Hood, was in the 587th. His plane was shot down on his 50th mission

February 21, 1945 and died seven days later in a Muenster, Germany hospital. I have many letters from Les and am very much interested in his experiences in Europe which

he was going to tell me more about “later.”

I want to contact John B. Perry and his son by e-mail.

Date:
11/28/2004
Time:
12:55 PM

Marauder Man, Lieutenant Harry Charles Sperry, co-pilot, 599th Bomb Squadron, 397th Bomb Group

Date:
11/28/2004
Time:
6:31 AM

Gayle L. Smith, Group Operations Officer, 387th Bomb Group, Reunion 2000

I sought advice from several individuals on the type of presentation that I should give. They ranged from a Senator John McCain patriotic speech to a “feel good”, to a

President Harry S. Truman type – “Tell them like it is”. I think, in today’s political and socially correct society, I better steer clear of President Truman’s method

of calling an S.O.B. an S.O.B. or his “give them hell” method or the trial lawyers might hit me with a class action suit. read more …

Each bomb group had 1 group operations officer. Gayle Smith was the 387ths GOO – the Marauder Man story doesn’t get any clearer than Gayle’s presentation.

Date:
11/27/2004
Time:
11:38 PM

I just discovered your site last week and over Thanksgiving, I spoke of it to my Dad, John B. Perry. He is now 84 and recovering from a broken hip. He is not very good

at using the Internet but I helped him log on and enter into your Guest Book. He has documented his experiences in the 394th Bomb Group, 587 Squadron in detail and over

the next few months, I will help him scan and email information to you. Please let me know what the best method is. He is really excited about getting on the Internet

and getting involved with your web site. Thanks for doing such a great job. He has photos of other crews of the 587 squadron, some with names.

Best Regards and thank you for maintaining such a terrific and important web site.

Carl A. Perry

Date:
11/26/2004
Time:
4:38 PM

My husband, Cecil L Nelson, pilot in the 599th bomb squadron, 397th bomb group, just passed away Nov. 21, 2004. He was a WW 2 Marauder Bridge Buster. Will write more

later about these wonderful men and their planes. We were married 57 years. Mrs. Cecil L. Nelson

Date:
11/25/2004
Time:
8:54 PM

Marauderman’s Name: Ralph A. Kusluch
Bomb Group: 322nd
Bomb Squadron: 450th
Years in service: January 1941 to August 1945
Graduation Class: ?
Class Location: ?
Comments: Ralph was my uncle, at the time of his death in August 1945 I was four years old. My father was only able to tell me that his brother flew “fire hydrant”

bombers. My father had no background in aviation so that’s about all I had. I’ve always wondered what type of aircraft it was. I finally deduced it was the B-26 from

watching “Wings” on TV. Growing up as a boy I always wanted to be a pilot. Unfortunately I only managed to become a naval aircrew man in the U.S. Navy. All I have of my

uncle is a pair of his pilots wings. I found this web site doing a Goggle search. I do know that he died in Germany flying a German Messerschmitt. I was also told by my

aunt the he was awarded the DFC with oak leaf cluster. So if anyone has more information about his squadron, a source for a picture of the airplane, or any other

information I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks, AEC Gerard Kusluch USN (RET)

Date:
11/25/2004
Time:
6:15 PM

Marauderman’s Name: John B. Perry
Bomb Group: 394th.
Bomb Squadron: 587th
Years in service:3 1/2 1942-1945
Graduation Class: ?
Class Location: ?
Comments: Name of Plane: The Fly’n Dutchman, Capt. Bill Schulte – Commander; Pierce, Co-Pilot; Lt. Watson, Navigator; T/Sgt J. Perry, Radio/Gunner; S/Sgt Prosser,

Flight Engineer; Sgt. Carson, Tail Gunner

John — your crew was one of the original 387th crews flying over from the USA to England. Of interest “The Flying Dutchman” was being flown on 8/2/43 by Capt Charles

G Fraser when it was severely battle damaged. It was returned to the squadron in December 1944 and flew until 2/23/45 when it was again flak damaged while 2.Lt Truman C

Andrews and crew were flying it. It never returned to the squadron.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
Historian b26.com

Date:
11/24/2004
Time:
5:43 PM

THE STARS AND STRIPES, Wednesday, August 11, 1943, “B26 Used for Medium and Low-Level Attacks Here”

How many Marauder Men remember this article? Thanks John Beach for sending it in!

Date:
11/22/2004
Time:
6:09 AM

Ralph M. Wefel — S/SGT Radio Op / Gunner; Ninth Air Force (ETO) — 323rd BG / 455th BS — 26 missions. Washed out Cadet Candidate by depth perception test at Santa

Ana AFB, California. Attended Sioux Falls, S.D., USAAF Radio School. Joined First LT Taylor W. McGee’s crew at Barksdale Field, Shreveport, LA. Flew all 26 missions

from French USAAF bases. — CHEERS, USAAF B-26 Vets !!!

Date:
11/22/2004
Time:
5:28 AM

I was reading your site and was intrigued by the postings from fellow veterans and some of the information you were able to obtain. My uncle was Howard E. Kithcart, he

flew with the 320th, died in a crash, Feb 1945. we are looking for some info on his death and have heard a few conflicting stories. I hope that you can help us in

obtaining some accurate records. I probably have written the wrong people, but one can hope. I thank you for any information that one can give. Carrie Kithcart

Date:
11/19/2004
Time:
6:49 AM

My good dear friend Robert L. Gridley just passed away this last Monday 15th November. We laid him to rest in Baker, LA yesterday with full military honors. He served

with the 386th Bomb Group as a B-26 pilot during combat, and was located in Beaumont, France According to his WD AGO 100 he served for 25 months in the grade of 1st Lt.

On his form 53-98 Battles and Campaigns: European Air Offensive–Rhineland–Ardennes–Central Europe. Decorations: European, African, Middle Eastern Campaign Medal;

WWII Victory Medal; Army Occupation Medal. He separated from the Air Force 16 Jan 1947. I guess just before the AAC became a separate unit in 1947.

May he rest in peace…God Bless you Robert…

Rodney Bell Sgt. USAF 1971-75 http://udornvet.com
~Baton Rouge, LA~
Veteran of Southeast Asia
F-4D Crew Chief
Udorn RTAFB, Thailand 1973-74

*****Home of the Hunters*****

How about this for a coincidence? Two posts come in a couple of days a part. They don’t know each other and Chester Klier flew on the same mission.

Date:
11/18/2004
Time:
6:49 AM

I’m trying to find information on my uncle, W. Fred Cox Jr. who was attached to the 552 Bomb Squadron, 386 Group. He was a First Pilot killed by anti-aircraft fire

while flying over France September 1943. His service number was 0-662628. I would like to talk to anyone who knew him or knows any information about the bombing mission

on which he was shot down. Thank you, Jay Warner

Guest book ref. November 19, 2004. Subject, W. Fred Cox, Jr. 552nd B.S., 386th B.G.

Hello Jay, I saw your notice in the guest book asking for data concerning your uncle who was a pilot in my squadron. I have been the 386th Bomb Group Historian for

nearly 25 years. I was in the ship flying directly behind and slightly below your uncle when his ship was hit by flak. The fire from his left wing and engine passed

over the top of my plane and extended about 100 feet to the rear. I was wounded along with both pilots flying in the plane next to my crew.

If you check into my web page as listed at the bottom of this page, you can read the entire story of his last mission, which I list as 029. Your uncle flew on the

following listed missions. Diversionary missions number 2 and 3. Combat missions number: 001, 004, 006, 008, 012, 013, 015, 017, 019, 023. Then a recalled mission on

September 26, 1943, and combat mission number 029 when he was shot down.

If you click on “formation diagrams” you will be able to see the flight position that he flew on all of the aforementioned missions. I try to add more stories about the

386th every few weeks, so stay in touch. At the moment I have 16 pages of photos on my web page. Many of the stories also include other photos that pertain to each

particular story.

I have 181 items on my web page to click on, which includes 81 mission formation diagrams.

There was a request for information about Staff Sergeant Arthur Vermette on the web site ( see below ) – he was a member of your uncle’s crew and was flying with him

when they were shot down. The entire crew was killed in action that day! That request was referred to my web page listing mission number 029.

A man in France by the name of John Chatel and I have been in contact with for several years concerning the missions the 386th flew in his area. He lives a short

distance back from Normandy Beach, he also set up a wonderful display in a museum there depicting the activities of the 386th Bomb Group on D-DAY, 60 years ago last

June 6, 2004. He informed me some time ago that he installed a plaque at the crash site honoring your uncle’s crew by listing their names thereon. The location is two

miles south of St. Valery airdrome in an area called Cany-Barville, France. Well Jay, that is all for this sortie. Tallyho.

Chester P. Klier – Historian, 386th B.G.

Date:
11/16/2004
Time:
10:32 PM

My uncle, Arthur Vermette, flew in a B26. He flew in the “Dottie” and the “Danny-Boy-2”. He was killed in 1943 over France. Could you give me any info you may have on

him or his crew. I believe he was a “belly” gunner. Thank you, Jim McKee

Name: Arthur J Vermette; Rank: S/Sgt; Serial Number: 16067XXX; Unit: 552nd Bomb Squadron, 386th Bomb Group; Service State: IL; Date of Death: 27 Sept 1943; Grave

Location: I – 26 – 10; Awards: Air Medal, Oak Leaf Cluster, Purple Heart.

Mr. Vermette is buried in the Normandy American Cemetery – http://www.abmc.gov/no.htm

Mission details provided by Chester Klier, 386th Bomb Group historian. Mission number 29

Date:
11/15/2004
Time:
8:44 PM

James H. Skinner
Radio/Navigator
“Mild and Bitter”
452 BS
322 BG
9th Air Force

My name is John H. Beach. My uncle, James H. Skinner, flew as a radio/navigator with the B26 in the ETO. See http://www.b26.com/marauderman/james_skinner.htm.

I have noticed several folks asking for “Stars and Stripes” papers describing various missions into Holland. I have an interesting copy of Vol. 3, No. 240 Wed. Aug. 11,

1943. There is a front page article on the B26 Marauder when it’s secret use was unmasked for the first time. It explained that on May 14, 1943 it was first used to

bomb Velson, Holland at treetop level with complete success, but on May 17 10 B26’s were lost in one operation. {It seemed that the German’s crude radar and spotters

was able to detect them and point effective AAA on them.} Operations were suspended until new tactics could be worked out.

On July 17, 1943 they again flew, but at a medium altitude while covered by Spitfires around them and P47s above. This raid was successful and all returned to their

base. Since then they only have lost two plane using these tactics. The article further explained that they still did low lever bombing when it fit the operations and

had air and ground support. There was a photo of a B26 flying over water with a tail ID of H7694.

Further information on my uncle:
My uncle was stationed in England until Sep. 1944 then in France until April 1945 and then in Belgium until he started for home in June of 1945. Anyone that has any

photos of this wing or knowledge of Cpl. James H. Skinner I would like to exchange information.

Another wonderful research project:
I also have done a lot of research on a past close friend and highly decorated hero, Dr. Arie Dirk Bestebreurtje, Major, retired. See

http://www.b26.com/page/arie.d.bestebreurtje.htm. I am interested in learning more about the bombing raids before Operation Market Garden, especially over Nijmegen and

also during that operation. This is where Capt. Bestebreurtje jumped as a Jedburgh OSS agent. He was in the lead plane and jumped with General James Gavin.

Kind regards,
John H. Beach

Date:
11/13/2004
Time:
12:20 PM

My name is Leo K. Simpson. I was attached to the 444th Bomb Squadron as an instrument specialist in August of l942. Served with the 444th for approx 3 years. My last

airplane as crew chief was Fubar. It ended the war with 154 missions . Our squadron was part of the 320th Bomb group and served in North Africa, Sardinia, Corsica, and

France. Our planes were taken away from us in France and we served in Germany as part of the group searching for German war material. We finally returned to the zone of

the interior in September 1945. I was discharged from the Air Force on September 25, 1945. – “KEEP ‘EM FLYING”

Date:
11/11/2004
Time:
11:00 PM

Bonjour. Je suis français. J’habite près de Paris, Votre site sur les B26 Marauder est très intéressant et je vous félicite pour la somme d’informations qu’il contient.

Votre °APPEL° m’incite à faire la mise au point suivante: En page 3 “Photos B 26 ” ( not B26.COM ) de votre site, on voit la photo d’un B26 coupé en 2 par la flak et

vous précisez que cet avion est britannique, ce qui est faux. Il est français et appartient à la 34 ème escadre de bombardement moyen des FAFL, qui est composé de 3

groupes baptisés : “Franche Comté” , “Sénégal”, “Bourgogne”. Cet avion est de groupe “Bourgogne” ( grands vins français ) et il est surnommé “Vosne Romanée” (célèbre

chateau des vins de Bourgogne). Vous pouvez remarquer que la cocarde française bleu-blanc-rouge est peinte à la place de l’étoile à 5 branches américaine. Cet avion

vole dans une formation de 18 B26 des FAFL qui vont bombarder l’usine de munitions de JOCKGRIN en Allemagne. C’est un type G. Son serial number est 4334281 . Le numéro

d’identification français peint en grosses lettres vertes sur la dérive est 62. La date du bombardement est le 14 février 1945. Léquipage est de 7 membres. 3 ont

disparu dans la chute. Ce sont:
Commandant ROLLAND chef de bord
Lieutenant VAL bombardier
” ” BERTRAND mécanicien
4 ont la vie savuve. Ce sont:
Lieutenant MERCIER pilote
” ” BEAULIEU radio
” ” CHAMPROMIS navigateur
Sergent FAUDRY mitraille
L’histoire survenue à cet avion a été racontée dans un grand journal français (Paris Match) en 1965. J’ajouterai que le B26G serial number 4334253 (46) appartenant

aussi à la 34 ème escadre a été abattu par la flak le 17 novembre 1944 en bombardant le pont ferroviaire de NEUENBURG sur le Rhin en Allemagne. Mon frére radio à bord

de cet avion a disparu avec 4 autres membres d’équipage. En pièces jointes :

– 2 photos prises sur l’aérodrome de Pontoise près de paris en 1997 lors d’une manifestation en l’honneur du 344 ème Bomb Group équipé de B26 qui avait stationné sur ce

terrain en 1944/1945. Sur l’une des photos, remarquez la maquette volante du B26 construit à la mémoire de mon frère disparu en 1944
-1 photo du B26 exposé au Musée de l’Air au Bourget près de Paris.

Amitiés d’un ancien de l’Armée de l’Air Française.

A poor translation using translator software ( accurate translation welcomed )

Hello. I am French. I live close to Paris. Your site on B26 Marauder is very interesting and I congratulate you for the sum on information which it contains. Your

°APPEL° encourages to me to make the following development: On page 3 “Photographs B 26” of your site, one sees the photograph of B26 cut into 2 by the flak and you

specify that this plane is British, which is false. It is French and belongs to the 34 2nd squadron of average bombardment of the FAFL, which is composed of 3 baptized

groups: “Honest County”, “Senegal”, “Burgundy”. This plane is of group “Burgundy” (high-class wines French) and it is called “Vosne Romanée” (castle of the wines of

Burgundy celebrates). You can notice that the French rosette blue-white-red is painted in the place of American star with 5 branches. This plane flies in a formation of

18 B26 of the FAFL which will bombard the factory of ammunition of JOCKGRIN in Germany. It is a type G. Its serial number is 4334281. The French identification number

painted in large green letters on the drift is 62. The date of the bombardment is on February 14, 1945. Léquipage is of 7 members. 3 disappeared in the fall. It is:
Commander ROLLAND chief of edge
Lieutenant VALLEY bomber
“” BERTRAND mechanic 4 have the life savuve. It is:
Pilot lieutenant DRAPER
“” BEAULIEU radio
“” CHAMPROMIS navigator
Sergeant FAUDRY grapeshot the history to this plane was told in a large French newspaper (Paris Match) in 1965. I will add that the B26G serial number 4334253 (46) also

pertaining to the 34 2nd squadron was cut down by the flak on November 17, 1944 by bombarding the railway bridge of NEUENBURG on the Rhine in Allemagne. Mon radio frére

on board this plane disappeared with 4 other members from crew. In enclosures:
– 2 photographs taken on the aerodrome of Pontoise close of bets in 1997 at the time of a demonstration in the honor of the 344 2nd Bomb Group equipped with B26 which

had stationed on this ground into 1944/1945. On one of the photographs, notice the flying model of B26 built with the memory of my brother missing in 1944
-1 photograph from B26 exposed to the Museum from the Air in Le Bourget close to Paris.

Friendships of old of the French Air Force.

Date:
11/11/2004
Time:
10:16 PM

Richard Robinson, B-26 Pilot
323 BG
455 BS
“Liberty Lady” YU V 4131781 (and others?)
“Robbie” is my wife’s uncle

Bailed out on return from Schipol bombing run in 1943, not sure if this was mission #54 or #55. The mission was told by Bud Hutton (Stars & Stripes). I am not sure if

Bud flew on this mission, but he flew with Robbie on some. There is a pic somewhere of Robbie, and others, by the b26. This pic was used in a Kodak Ad, I believe Life

Mag.

Richard was awarded the British Dist. Flying Cross, LT. Col. Geo. P. Gould of St. Paul, Minn. and 2nd LT. Richard E. Robinson of IL. and LT. Olaf A. Begre of Lichville,

N. D., bombardier also received the award. Rich has Medals and Ribbons.

The Col. made a crash landing without injury to his crew. Lt. Robinson & his crew bailed out after losing both engines, the pilot jumping at 400 ft. after remaining

with the plane to prevent it from crashing into a village. Both men hold the Amer. Distinguished Flying Cross & LT. Robinson also has a cluster to the award.

We are new to this B26 history and will have to tell Robbie that we are looking into his past. Any info or connection would be appreciated, nose art, missions, etc.

Question: What happens to the planes name after a crash? can it be re-used, was another plane of Robbie’s called “Lady Liberty? I will have to ask him how many B-26’s

he had.

Thanks J & P

John — the names painted on B26’s were very personnel to both the crew assigned to that B26 and the crew chief responsible for maintaining it. Often the crew chose

the name, but on occasion it was the crew chief who named it. In most Groups when a B26 was lost or salvaged the artwork and name was lost with the plane. Then when a

new B26 was assigned either the original name with either 2nd or II was added, or the new plane was given an entirely new name.

One Group stood apart from the others because of the excellent artwork that adorned its Marauders. This was the 394th Bomb Group and when they lost an airplane through

damage, or they moved onto another B26 they would take the nose art with them since this was normally painted onto detachable panels on the B26.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
11/9/2004
Time:
10:12 PM

Hi, I’m interested in any information, Group, squadron, plane, missions for a Lt. Arthur J. DeSaulniers, KIA on Dec. 23,1944. Thanks, Shawn M. Kelly

Dec. 23,1944 was a particularly bad day for the 397th, during the Battle of the Bulge, on that day several Martin B-26 crews were lost. Mr. DeSaulniers was a co-pilot

in the 596th Bomb Squadron, 397th Bomb Group and also flew in 1 Pathfinders.

Date:
11/9/2004
Time:
1:41 PM

Marauderman’s Name: Lawrence Lee Kreissler
Bomb Group: 320th
Bomb Squadron: 444th
Years in service: December 1941 to December 11, 1945
Graduation Class: September 1942
Class Location: Spence Field, near Moultrie, Georgia
Plane: B26 – Missouri Mule
Comments: Looking for advice on anything that will help me dive deeper into the groups/areas my grandfather served. Thanks! Ken Nichols (grandson of Lawrence

Kreissler).

October 1942 sent to North Africa . Flew 23 missions. Name of plane: Missouri Mule
Plane was shot down near El Alamein line on Monday, November 16, 1942
Was told later that he was captured by the Germans for a short time who gave him medical attention. Germans were overrun by Australian troops…Germans left him behind

when they retreated, where the Australians then got him back to a US unit
Spent 7 to 8 months recovering in New Orleans (Metairie area) recovering from injuries
May 1943 was sent to San Francisco to train on the C87…and then served in the OSS
September 1943 was sent to Mitchell Field, Wisconsin for reassignment
September 1943 sent to Rosecrans Air Force Base in St. Joseph’s, Missouri where he served as instructor in ground school, etc.
Was due to be discharged on September 11, 1945, but was selected as one of ten men to deactivate the base. Discharged from Scotts Field in Illinois on December 11, 1945
Served in the Korean conflict in the 444th Bomber Squadron

Date:
11/8/2004
Time:
8:20 PM

I am looking for information on my uncle, Capt. James M. Peters. He flew 83 or 85 missions over Europe in WWII. He then came home and died in a training crash. He was

flying out of Del Rio, Texas at the time. I would just like to know any information you might have.

Thanks,
Roy W. Peters

Hello Roy Peters: Ref. Guest book dated November 8, 2004.

Your uncle Lieutenant James Peters flew with the 554th Bomb Squadron in the 386th Bomb Group during World War Two. The following is only a partial listing of the combat

missions that he flew. Group mission numbers: 007, 009, 010, 012, 014, 016, 022, 025, 027, 029, 031, 032, 034, 036, 040, 187, and 195. These can be found on my web

page, click on the address shown. http://www.b26.com/historian/chester_klier.htm The position he flew in the formation can be found by clicking on Formation Diagrams.

I have written complete stories concerning the above listed missions. September 27, 1943, Group Mission Number 029 – your uncle and I both flew on this one. I was

wounded by flak along with two pilots from my 552nd Squadron. We had one of our planes shot down as well, entire crew was killed.

Your uncle also flew on the following missions: 092, 176, 216, and 222. If you click on Formation Diagrams your uncle’s name will come up showing where he flew in the

formation and other data such as target, bomb loads, weather, bombing results, etc. At present the stories for these missions are not written.

As I understand, your uncle Captain James Peters was killed while flying in the U.S. after the war, I have no information on that. I do know that one of our 386th

pilots’ was killed while serving as an instructor pilot at a B-47 Jet Bomber training facility.

I hope this information will answer some of the questions you had concerning your uncle’s military service in World War Two.

Chester P. Klier – Historian, 386th Bomb Group

Date:
11/8/2004
Time:
8:57 AM

Good morning! I am looking for information on my Uncle, Fred R. Ellsworth. He was a member of the 320th Bomber Group Medium and was listed as “Missing” on May 9, 1943.

I am trying to put together a paragraph for the World War II memorial website. I didn’t find my uncle’s name on the list of people

http://www.b26.com/page/320th.bomb.group.roster.htm. Also I thought he trained on a B-25 but that could be a typo. Can you help me find any information on him.

This is what I have gathered so far:
“Fred R. Ellsworth (Killed in Action) enlisted in the Army Air Corps on April 29, 1941 in San Francisco, California. As a pilot of the ??????? Fred achieved the rank of

Captain while serving with the 442nd Bomb Squadron, 320th Bombardment Group in the European-African Middle Eastern Theater. During his service Fred was awarded the

World War II Victory Medal, Service Lapel Button, and European-African Middle Eastern Theater Medal with one bronze battle star, Purple Heart and an Air Medal. Fred’s

crew flew their final mission on May 9, 1943 when their plane went down in the Tyrrhenian Sea, about 20 miles north of Cape San Vito, Sicily ; none of his heroic crew

survived.”

My Grandparents never talked about Fred and my Dad passed away in April of 2003 so I don’t have any relatives to talk to about this.

Thanks for your help,
Jill R. Scott

Date:
11/5/2004
Time:
6:30 AM

Tuskegee Airmen Mark 60th Anniversary

In an era of Jim Crow when the Army brass didn’t think they were capable of flying, a group of pilots changed the way the military looked at blacks. The Tuskegee

Airmen, their ranks thinning as the World War II fighter pilots age, hold a reunion in South Carolina that begins Friday. … None of the bombers escorted by Tuskegee

Airmen fighters were lost during World War II.

Date:
11/4/2004
Time:
6:34 PM

I am looking for information about a bomber pilot killed on the Monte Cassino Italy mission. His name was Woodrow Wilson Owens. He was part of the African Campaign. I

would like to know the name of the American cemetery in Italy, located about 50 miles north of Rome where I believe he is buried. He was my uncle. Thank you. Susan

O’Mara

2Lt. Woodrow W Owens; 320 Bomb Group, 441st Bomb Squadron; home state Maryland; date of death 21 Jan 1944; grave site location F-11-10; Awards, Air Medal/Oak Leaf

Cluster. Florence American Cemetery http://www.abmc.gov/fl.htm

Date:
11/4/2004
Time:
6:49 AM

Many thanks to the makers of this web board. I have long enjoyed reading the notes here. I am now 79 years old, but still young in spirit – many thanks to those who

have contributed here.

Francis A. Short, 322BG

Date:
10/31/2004
Time:
9:49 AM

Comments: I am compiling an historical account of one of the formations on the March 18, 1945 morning mission to Worms, Germany. One of the formations of that mission

were 36 Douglas A-26 Invaders of the 416th BG led by a Pathfinder B-26B Marauder. That aircraft was shot down by flak while circling the IP. The tail number of the

aircraft was 41-31686 (FW =*= B) and the name of the aircraft was “Tabasco”. No parachutes were sighted so it is assumed all aboard perished. The MACR is 13517, which I

don’t have.

My focus is on writing an historical documentation of the 416th BG part in the mission and the B-26B PFF plane leading the first box was an integral part of that

mission. Does anyone have the names of the B-26B crewman on Tabasco that day?

Thanks so much for any help in this matter.

Regards,
Carl Sgamboti

Tabasco – Martin B-26 Marauder, 556th Bomb Squadron, 387th Bomb Group.

Date:
10/30/2004
Time:
9:19 PM

Denis Cuff BombGp: ? Squadron: ? Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Hi My uncle, Denis Cuff, flew and was shot down in a B26 in April 1945 over Italy. I was

wondering if anyone knew him or had any information on him. He was part of the SAAF, but I am not sure of his squadron number. Thank you, Craig Cuff

My name is Jack Millin, the reunion organizer of the B26 Marauder Air Crew Association. Our members operated on B26 a/c on 12/21/24/25 & 30 Sqdn’s SAAF in Italy. 25

Sqdn was part of Balkan Air Force operating from Biferno. The other 4 Sqnd’s were based at Jesi.

Lt Denis Claude Cuff was a member of 24 Sqdn SAAF and was shot down on 21 April 1945 It was the last a/c lost by any Sqdn in 3 Wing. I will attach by separate e-mail a

scan from 24 Sqdn’s history giving details of your uncles last flight. The crew of 6 were 3 SAAF & 3 RAF

The history of 24 SAAF is – ‘Per Noctem Per Diem’ the story of 24 Squadron SAAB by E N Tucker & P M J McGregor; Publisher 24 Squadron Album Committee. Printed in South

Africa by Cape Times Ltd, Cape Town.

Kind regards
Jack Millin

Date:
10/29/2004
Time:
8:46 PM

I am interested in any info people have concerning Col. Ralph Rhudy, who was commander of the 410th Bomb Group in September 1943. My Aunt is researching RHUDY history

and family tree, we believe he is a relative. Anything you can provide or guide me to would be appreciated. Sincerely, Kent Rhudy

Date:
10/29/2004
Time:
8:46 PM

Léon Lebreau, FFAF Marauder Man, radioman & gunner in GB 11/20, Bretagne.

Date:
10/26/2004
Time:
7:24 AM

Name: Scott Nelson
Location: North Dakota

INQUIRY: Is there anyone with information about the 17th Bombardment Group 95th Squadron when they were at Pendleton, Oregon in December of 1941? I was doing research

for a veteran’s history project when a veteran I was interviewing, George Orr, said he was co-pilot of the plane that sunk a Japanese submarine on Christmas Eve of

’41. This information was confirmed by a gunner engineer that was in the same group and squadron. It was also confirmed by an old newspaper article. The problem is the

names don’t match up with information I’ve found in books regarding the co-pilot of that ship. I would appreciate any information that any individual could provide.

Response
17th BOMBARDMENT GROUP
Authorized as 17th Observation Group on 18 Oct 1927. Redesignated 17th Pursuit Group in 1929. Activated on 15 Jul 1931. Redesignated 17th Attack group in 1935, and 17th

Bombardment Group (Medium) in 1939. Trained and participated in maneuvers, using P-12 and P-26 (1931-1932), A-17 (1933-1939), and B-18 (1940-1941) aircraft. Used B-25’s

for patrol duty on the west coast after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and later patrolled the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic coast. Converted to Martin B-26

Marauder’s in the summer of 1942.

Moved to North Africa late in 1942 and began operations on 30 Dec. Served in combat in the Mediterranean theater until the end of the war, being assigned first to

Twelfth AF, then to Fifteenth (Nov 1943), and again to Twelfth (Jan 1944). Flew interdictory and close-support missions, bombing bridges, rail lines, marshalling yards,

harbors, shipping, gun emplacements, troop concentrations, and other targets. Helped to bring about the defeat of Axis forces in North Africa in May 1943; assisted in

the reduction of Pantelleria and Lampedusa in Jun 1943; participated in the invasions of Sicily in Jul and of Italy in Sep 1943; and took part in the drive toward Rome,

receiving a DUC for a bombing attack on airdromes at Rome on 13 Jan 1944. Also received the French Croix de Guerre with Palm for operations in Italy, Apr-Jun 1944. Took

part in the invasion of Southern France in Aug 1944, and continued bombardment operations in northern Italy, France, and later in Germany. Received second DUC for

bombing attacks on enemy defenses near Schweinfurt on 10 Apr 1945. Assisted in the disarmament of Germany after V-E Day. Returned to the US in Nov. Inactivated on 26

Nov 1945. Redesignated 17th Bombardment Group (Light). Activated on 19 May 1947. Apparently did not become operative. Inactivated on 1o Sep 1948.

Activated in Korea on 10 May 1952. Assigned to Far East Air Forces and equipped with Douglas B-26’s for service in the Korean War. Engaged in interdiction and provided

close support for UN ground forces until the armistice in Jul 1953. Moved to Japan in Oct 1954; returned to the US, Mar-Apr 1955. Assigned to Tactical Air Command and

equipped with B-57 aircraft. Redesignated 17th Bombardment Group (Tactical) in Oct 1955

SQUADRONS. 34th: 1931-1945; 1947-1948 1952- 37th: 1931-1945 1947-1948 1952-. 73d: 1947-1948; 1952-. 95th: 1931-1945 1947-1948; 1952- 432d: 1942-1945-

STATIONS. March Field, Calif, 15 Jul 1931; McChord Field, Wash, 24 Jun 1940; Pendleton, Oregon, 29 Jun 1941; Lexington County Aprt, SC, 9 Feb 1942; Barksdale Field, La

23 Jun-Nov 1942 Telergma, Algeria, Dec 1942; Sedrata, Algeria, c. 10 May 1943; Djedeida, Tunisia, 23 Jun 1943 Sardinia, Nov 1943; Corsica, c. 14 Sep 1944; Dijon,

France, c. 20 Nov 1944; Horsching, Austria, Jun 1945; Clastres, France c. Oct-Nov 1945; Camp Myles Standish, Mass, Nov-26 Nov 1945. Langley Field, Va, 19 May 1947-10

Sep 1948. Pusan, Korea, 10 May 1952; Miho, Japan, 10 Oct 1954-16 Mar 1955; Eglin AF Aux Field No 9, Apr 1955-

COMMANDERS. Capt Frank O’D Hunter, 1931-unkn; Lt Col Walter R Peck, Mar 1941; Lt Col William C Mills, Feb 1942; Lt Col Flint Garrison, 16 Jun 1942; Lt Col Curtis D

Slumam, 26 Jun 1942; Lt Col Karl E Baumeister, 11 Mar 1943; Lt Col Charles R Greening, 25 May 1943; Lt Col Robert A Zaiser, 18 Jul 1943; Col Donald L Gibbert, 14 Oct

1943; Col R O Harrell, 21 Jul 1944; Col Wallace C Barrett, 20 Mar 1945; Lt Col Stanford W Gregory, I Jun 1945-unkn. Unkn, 1947-1948. Col James D Kemp, 10 May 1952; Col

William C Lindley Jr, II Jul 1952; Col Robert E Keating, 14 Feb 1953; Col Gordon D Timmons, 8 Apr 1953; Col George D Hughes, 1954; Col Norton W Sanders, 1954-

CAMPAIGNS. World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Combat, EAME Theater; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Anzio; Rome-Arno; Southern France; North Apennines;

Rhineland; Central Europe. Korean War: Korea Summer-Fall, 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea Summer-Fall, 1953

DECORATIONS. Distinguished Unit Citations: Italy, 13 Jan 1944; Schweinfurt, Germany, 10 Apr 1945; Korea, 1 Dec 1952-30 Apr 1953. French Croix de Guerre with Palm: Apr,

May, and Jun 1944. Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation: 24 May 1952-31 Mar 1953.

INSIGNE. Shield: Or, seven crosses pattee in pale sable. Crest: On a wreath of the colors (or and sable) a griffin rampant of the first, beaked, fore-legged and winged

of the second, and langued gules. Motto: TOUJOURS AU DANGER-Ever Into Danger. (Approved r9 Jan 1934)

Source: Air Force Combat Units of World War II. ISBN 0-912799-02-1

Date:
10/25/2004
Time:
6:52 PM

I send our condolences to the Curtin Family on the death of this fine gentleman, one of the stalwarts who made the 456th Squadron Association the tremendous

organization it was all these years.

Tom, Worn and others worked so hard down through the years to keep the group active with its annual reunions, the always anticipated gathering again of old comrades-

in-arms who shared those eventful WWII years.

I salute you all.
Phil Scheier

Date:
10/25/2004
Time:
7:20 PM

I live in Sheridan, Wyoming. Today, while performing TSA airport security, I had the privilege of meeting retired Brigadier General Henry Newcomer. In talking with him,

he commanded a squadron or group of B-26’s (451st?) in Europe and completed 84 missions. He was in Sheridan along with his adjutant and their squadron maintenance

officer, last names unknown. Sincerely, Dale H.

Dale, you met some great Marauder Men! They had their reunion in the fine State of Wyoming.

Date:
10/24/2004
Time:
5:02 PM

My father, Jerome Banicki, was a navigator in B26 during WW2 and served with the 444th bomb squadron, 320th bomb group. He was a POW and bailed out 5 times during war

and lived through various stories. He is also the reason the POW camp was liberated by US and not the Russians. Contact him for wonderful insight. Thanks. Ms. Banicki

Date:
10/23/2004
Time:
10:02 PM

First, I am sad to report that Peter Quinn has passed away. He was well known to most of us in his role in Group Headquarters during the war and also his attendance at

reunions.

Secondly I want to report that last night I was the speaker at the annual formal banquet of the combined Akron University and Kent State University Air Force ROTC. It

was a real honor to be there. About 200 fine looking young men and women obviously dedicated to service to their country listened to my 25 minute address and then kept

me for an additional 45 minutes with questions about what it was like “back then.” They now know a lot about the 386th Bomb Group and they were intensely interested and

visibly impressed. We should all continue to spread the word as long as we can. I believe we were part of something of which we can be very proud.

Harry Guinther

Date:
10/22/2004
Time:
10:23 PM

Would appreciate locating/and or hearing from anyone who flew out of Pusan, Korea and would have known my husband, Captain Arthur B. Colwell. The squadron and bomb wing

eludes me after all these years; think Art returned about 1952 after finishing his 55 missions. He was then assigned to Vance AFB, Enid, Oklahoma. where he was an

instructor pilot . He was giving a final check ride when mechanical failure occurred and his plane crashed in Aline, Oklahoma March 18, 1955. We had been stationed at

Vance approximately three years – one B-26 crash occurred from Vance prior to Arts — the 26’s were temporarily grounded for inspection — the AF magazine reported in

an article titled “For the Want of a Bolt” that both crashes were mechanical failure. Joan (Colwell) Geary

Mrs. Geary, B26.COM is dedicated to Martin B-26 Marauder Men who flew in WW2. I have learned that many of these guys stayed in the service and went on to fly in

Douglas A/B 26s. Thanks for posting, of course the Douglas guys are welcome aboard.

Date:
10/20/2004
Time:
6:34 AM

Hello: I would like to have my Dad’s pictures and info displayed on this site with his marauder pals. What do I have to do. I have pictures and his log book of all of

his 63 missions. Help me. I am also looking for a copy of Marauder Men by John Moench. Can you help me get a copy. My dad, Lt Arthur Pakula, served with the 323 BG &

456 Squadron. His first mission was April 16, 1944 in England. He completed 63 missions. He was a pilot of a b-26 Marauder. Help me. Jackie Fitzgerald

Date:
10/20/2004
Time:
4:07 AM

Marauderman’s Name: Rene L. Broussard (R.L. Broussard)
Bomb Group: ?
Bomb Squadron: ?
Years in service: ?
Graduation Class:
Class Location:
Comments: Looking for info on my great uncle R. L. (René) Broussard, all I know of him is he flew tail gunner in B-26’s over N. Africa or FROM N. Africa. My grandma

lost all letters from him and such in hurricane Carla in the 60’s and my great uncle’s wife threw all his military memorabilia out when he died in 1962. All I have is

verbal history and that is slim. If you think you may remember him, or have a reference of him please contact me. I am trying to reconstruct a military history of my

family as far back as I can go. Thanks! Tom Adams

Date:
10/17/2004
Time:
4:34 PM

I am seeking unit, group, pictures of Airman Bob (Robert) Buzzard who served with the 9th Air Force in Europe as a b-26 Tail Gunner during WW2. He served on 17 missions

and missed his 18th due to Flack wounds from 17th mission. His Plane took a direct hit tearing off a wing on that 18th mission and all his beloved crew, but the

bombardier were killed. Later he remembered that the poor bombardier went insane from the experience of this 18th mission in a Veteran’s Hospital. I would love to find

pics of him and his Aircraft and crew for his Grandson. Retired Air Force Sergeant Major Robert Buzzard passed away back in 1989 but his spirit lives on in the Buzzard

Family and models of b-26’s are in everyone’s home. We would love to find out the name (if Any) of his B-26, nose art would be great. A crew picture too. God Bless.

Jack Cassell. WE REMEMBER YOU HEROES. THANKS with all our LOVE, admiration and AWE. The Buzzards

Date:
10/16/2004
Time:
1:18 PM

Hello, my uncle Harold Roberts was a machine gunner in the 344th bomb group, 497th bomb squadron. Any additional info would be greatly appreciated thank you. Gary

Roberts

Gary, the 344th just had their annual reunion in Orlando, Florida and the guys their gals are strong.

Date:
10/15/2004
Time:
6:31 PM

B-26 lost Italy August 1944 I.D? 21 August 1944 a B-26 (from Sardinia?) shot down/exploded near Futa Pass between Florence and Bologna. Two or three crewmen escaped.

The rest were killed when plane exploded. Sincerely, Phillip

Phillip, The B26 was 42-95752 BN.29 442nd BS 320th.Bomb Group. Shot down by flak over the target.

Regards
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Wine, Women & Song; Battle Number “29”; 320th BG, 442nd BS (Duck carrying a bomb) # 42-95752. Was hit by flak on mission dated 8-21-1944. Matlock was crew crew, and the

ship had 101 missions plus…
Regards,
Alf from Norway

Date:
10/12/2004
Time:
8:25 PM

Marauder Man, Harry Charles Sperry, Lieutenant, Co-Pilot, 599th Bomb Squadron, 397th Bomb Group. It may have been Dec 23 or the day before Christmas that, as I recall,

five or six planes didn’t come back and two or three others got back but were so shot up they couldn’t get their landing gear down and had to belly land on the field.

Fortunately, I was not on that mission. It was the next day, Christmas day, that I flew my first mission. On that day the plane ahead of us crash on take off because of

frost on its wings. The plane in number five position in our flight got knocked out over the target. Other planes were shot up but I don’t know if there were any others

that didn’t make it back. We were in number six position and were getting hit pretty badly. We could see, smell, taste and hear flack as well as feel the concussion.

The Germans knocked out our right engine over the target. It took a lot of time to get the bombs out that hung up in the bomb-bay because it was hit with flack. With

that, one dead engine, and the wings icing up, we were losing altitude like a rock. When we got down to about three thousand feet (lower than some of the mountain tops

around there) we finally got rid of the bombs, broke below the clouds. and the ice started to break off. Straining the good engine for all it had in it we finally got

back to our base. Needless to say, this was a very horrifying initiation that I will never forget. This was one of my worst mission. Although some of the missions were

what we called “Milk Runs” (not much enemy fire) we had a number of bad ones in the Battle of The Bulge where, again, we lost an engine a couple of times. When you

think of all the poor devils that never came back – I guess I was blessed.

Date:
10/11/2004
Time:
11:03 AM

Marauderman’s Name: George F. Myers T/Sgt Engineer/Gunner
Bomb Group: 17th
Bomb Squadron: 432nd
Years in service: 6 Mar 1943 – 9 Sept 1945
Graduation Class: Nov. 43
Class Location: Ft. Meyers, FL
Comments: My family is looking to have a thorough analysis done on our father’s time in Europe. The following information is all that we have currently. Ft. Meyers 9/24

1943 – 11/43. Then to MacDill airfield, Barksdale, Lake Charles then Hunter Field. Sardinia 7/15 – 9/21 1944 (Croix de Guerre 9/19/44) ; Corsica 9/21/ – 11/26 1944 (Air

Medal 21Oct 44 for mission over Tarascon France 6Aug44); Dijon, Fr 11/26 – received Purple Heart.

We are looking for all available information – missions, planes, crew, etc.

Many thanks. Great site.
Best regards,

Tim Myers
Stephen Myers

Date:
10/8/2004
Time:
11:13 PM

Since the incident took place over 50 years ago, I guess there’s no rush now. Here’s what I know:

My father-in-law, Maj. Joe S. Long, was flying a B-26 with a crew of five. He departed Kumean, South Korea, at 2300 and was headed to Yongyu, South Korea. The last

message was a posit at 2353. The crew was never heard from again. A search of the area and photos did not show any wreckage.

My questions deal with the practical aspects of flying a B-26. If the aircraft experienced a mechanical (engine failure) would it be easy to leave the plane and

parachute to the ground? I am not a pilot, but my understanding is that it is easier in some planes than others.

With a payload of 3,000 to 4,000 would it be possible to fly with one engine?

We have GPS and ring laser gyros these days. Fifty years ago, they had DR and Radio Direction Finding. How good were the navigators?

Given that the plane was heavily loaded, if there were an engine failure, wouldn’t you drop the load of bombs anywhere and try for a landing?

Thanks for the help,
Bruce Adams

Hello Bruce, the B-26s that flew in Korea were the original A-26s and they picked up the “B” when there were no longer any Marauders in the inventory. The plane they

are talking about was the Invader, North American product that I have about1500 hours in. To answer some of the questions about it. It cruised at 240 mph. It had a crew

of three, except when it led the formation in a glass nosed one and then the crew was four. The navigators were very good but they were also bombardiers at the same

time. Some time the navigator flew in the cockpit in the jump seat next to the pilot for it was a one pilot plane. One control. The B-26s in Korea sometime flew

individual sorties at low level which 2300 feet was considered that. It was very vulnerable to ground fire at that altitude, especially 20mm. It could fly very well on

one engine and I taught single engine approaches and landings in it. If it had an engine knocked out, the bombs were immediately jettisoned and the flight could

continue very well on one engine at about 190mph. Approach and landing air speed was about 130, with a touch down about 105. Bail out was easy but one had to be careful

that he wouldn’t hit the tail, so I taught roll over tactics for bail out. The crew member in the nose bailed out down through an exit there. The tail gunner went out

the side but he was below the tail and that was no problem. It sounds as if the plane in question was hit hard by ground fire which might have exploded the bombs or got

some direct hits on the plane itself.

Regards,
Hugh Walker, Pilot, Marauder Man
322nd BG/ 449th BS
391st BG/ 572 BS

Date:
10/8/2004
Time:
3:39 PM

Saturday October 16, there will be a dedication of a monument to the 323rd Bomb Group in Samoussy, France, adjacent to the old Laon Athies airbase, Station A-69. This

is where the 323rd was stationed from October 1944-February 1945.

Lou and I will attend along with around 60 people, both French and American.. We thank those whose contributions made this possible.

Lou and Carleton Rehr

Date:
10/7/2004
Time:
6:40 AM

Marauderman’s Name: Cpl D Lucero, engineer/gunner
Bomb Group: 391st
Bomb Squadron: 574th
Years in service:
Graduation Class:
Class Location:
Comments: “….On the morning mission to Ahrweiler, Germany 23 December 1944, Subjected to fire from enemy fighters, and badly damaged the B26 and its crew managed to

return safely to Roy/Amy – It was flying in position Box I, Flight 3 position 6……” – I would like to know if anyone has the aircraft number or painted name, in a

state side photo on the left front panel in large letters is “LE 4” any info would be appreciated.

Thank you,
Gerald Lucero

Gerald, the B26 you mention coded “LE.4” was only a training B26 at Lake Charles, Louisiana. The B26 on the 23rd December 1944 mission was 42-107720 4L-R piloted by

2.Lt Paul R Woods.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
10/6/2004
Time:
2:07 PM

Dr. Arie Bestebreurtje was a man that would become well known and respected in his lifetime. He was born in Rotterdam, Holland and became a champion speed skater in his

younger years, and later studied law in Zurich. When the war started he joined his country’s army and furthered his military training in England and later was assigned

to the Office of Strategic Services. Dr. Bestebreurtje would soon make history, working behind enemy lines as a team Jedburgh on missions to Market Garden, Camp

Westerbork, etc. working along side of the Dutch resistance. More information…
Date:
10/6/2004
Time:
5:59 AM

I note that my father-in-law, Curtis S. Church, is missing from the 320th roster. Curtis was a pilot in the 441st. He was shot down over Naples on 21 Aug 43 while

flying his 46th mission (I believe his aircraft was “Snuffy Smith”) and spent the remainder of the war as a POW.

He wrote a rather interesting memoir of his POW experience. A copy is in the Air Force library at Maxwell AFB and I can provide an electronic copy for the B-26 website,

if desired.

Curtis was a great guy. Sadly, he died about 2 1/2 years ago.

His fishing buddies used to kid him about being a German ace. He lost 5 B-26s. One in Tampa Bay during training when an engine quit on take-off (co-pilot). Four as

pilot: two belly landed with battle damage, one ditched in the Med when they ran out of fuel after going down to the surface to drop their raft to a crew whose plane

just exploded while returning from a mission, and the one shot down by fighters over Naples. Amazingly, no one was killed or even seriously injured in any of these

incidents. William Jones, Lt Col USAF (ret)

Date:
10/5/2004
Time:
7:53 PM

Mr. McCarty, This is a great site! Ashley Tribble

Date:
10/5/2004
Time:
1:06 PM

I am researching the 12th Infantry in WWII during the Utah beach landings. My great uncle was KIA on June 8th 1944. I have all the wounded and KIA for the 12th infantry

from the archives, but I still have not been able to find one that is still alive from June 1944 from Company C. In the process of doing this, I have a contact in

France that is helping me. I have been returning the favor by trying to find out info on the B26. His sisters, father in-law was a radio man on the B-26 out of North

Africa. He was with the Free French, (GB 11/20 “Bretagne”) that flew for the US. He is still alive. How do I get info on this squadron and would you be interested in

talking to him. If so I can get the info to you. Steve

Date:
10/5/2004
Time:
8:34 AM

Hi, I am interested in having research done on Clifton Freeman, B-26 pilot, 322 BG, deceased Europe 2/29/1944. I am interested in any and all information. The name of

his plane was “Sarah E,” but at the time of his death he was co-pilot of another plane. I know the Sarah E continued on and crashed on its 130th mission. Though outside

the realm of this request, I am also in any photos of Clifton and/or Sarah E. Any suggestions will be appreciated. Thank you. John Smithwick

John,

Clifton Freeman was with the 451st Bomb Squadron,322nd Bomb Group, and was shot down by flak on 29th February 1944. I can give a list of Clifton’s missions giving,

date, target, plane flown in and crew on each mission.

Regards,
Trevor Allen

Date:
10/3/2004
Time:
11:47 AM

Leslie E. Goss – I joined the 322nd Bomb Group, 452nd Squadron, in August 1944. I flew my first mission on September 16th, 1944, the day before the launch of the Market

Garden Operation. Flying out of Great Saling, England, Andrews Field, near Braintree. Target just across the Channel was the Railroad Bridge connecting Walcheron Island

to mainland Holland. Two hours and 10 minutes. I flew 40 missions and then went into Germany with the 322nd on Disarmament Program. I can furnish the dates of most of

my missions if this will help.

Date:
10/2/2004
Time:
8:29 PM

Hello, I visited fantasy of flight this summer great show the b26 he has there some memories for me 65 missions in one can you tell me about Thumper 432 sqd 17 bomb gp

– I made many missions in that old bird. Leo

Date:
10/1/2004
Time:
7:49 AM

I would like information on a B26 named “Mission Belle”. The pilot was Merle E. Parkinson and my brother, Max Anderson, was the radio-gunner. Max was in the 323rd Bomb

Group, 455th Bomb Squadron. The plane flew out of England and flew over 75 missions. I never got the chance to talk to Max about his experiences. I do have his flight

jacket with “Mission Belle” on the back along with 75 little bombs for the missions made. I was in England the same time he was but I was getting ready for the invasion

so never got to see him. My brother was 9 years older. Him and my sister was a dance team and very good. He was a very good tap dancer that also entertained at fairs

and ballrooms around Illinois. I hope to find out about the “Mission Belle”, and I would sure appreciate knowing more about Max’s many missions over Germany. I was in a

anti-aircraft unit and was in Germany too. I went into the 84th Infantry during the Bulge. I would welcome any information from people who served with my brother. Thank

you, Charles Anderson

Date:
9/28/2004
Time:
6:43 AM

I’m searching for details about the following 323rd BG Marauder Men:

– 1 Lt Arnold J Mandiberg, 323/453 (POW) – February 4, 1944. See Below
– 1 Lt Winton A Scott, 323/453 (POW)
– S/Sgt L.D. Morgan, 323/454 (POW)
– S/Sgt Robert C White, 323/453-455 (POW)
– S/Sgt George H. Coursen, 323/454 (KIA) – Died 23 Nov 1945; Buried Normandy American Cemetery; Plot Location B-21-17; Awards Air Medal, 2 Oak Leaf Clusters. Source:

B-26 Memorial Guide.
– T/Sgt Normand L Gobeil, 323/454 (MIA) – Dieppe Mission, 20 May 1944. Flying with Major Marion Morgan. “Morgan’s right engine caught fire. His engineer, Normand L

Gobeil, bailed out and damned near hit my turret as he fell. His tail gunner, L.D. Morgan, also bailed out. Postwar comments of Wilbur R. Charleston.
– Sgt Harry E McLandish, 323/453 (MIA)

What missions did they fly? Where did their plane crash (serial #, location, city, town, date)? I can’t find anything about Gobeil and McLandish in the NARA.

Thank you,
Rainer Kliemann
Bavaria/Germany

Initial findings in italics: February 4, 1944, the aircrews were briefed to attack the NoBalls at Linghem and Le Grismont but poor weather led to the missions being

scrubbed before take-off. Late on the 5th this attack finally got off the ground but weather over the targets forced all three boxes to drop on the secondary target-a

NoBall site at Dannes. The bombing results were fair to good but the cost was three aircraft with 19 aircrewmen lost, 30 other aircraft damaged and two returning

aircrew-man wounded. The Marauders going down had been flown by Capt. James N. Bryan, 1st Lt. Robert P Mims’ and 1st Lt. Arthur J. Mandiberg. Some parachutes were seen.

MIA were Capt. James N. Bryan, 1st Lt. John K. Brush, 1st Lt. Salvatore E. Echo, S/Sgt William J. Hendrickson, S/Sgt John A. Holton, 1st Lt. William J. Hook, 1st Lt.

Leon R. Jackson, 1st Lt. Arnold J. Mandiberg, 1st Lt. John R. Martin, Sgt Harry E. McLandish, T/Sgt William F. McLaren, 1st Lt. Robert P. Mims, S/Sgt Michael R. Miyo,

Sgt Paul C. Pearce, 1st Lt. Winton A. Scott, S/Sgt Silvio J. Tulipane, S/Sgt William F. Vermillion, S/Sgt Robert C. White and Capt. Charles L. Whyte.

The “Chriesman Crew” was scheduled as a spare but at the last minute it was ordered to take-off and join up in a number seven position. “As it so happened, this was in

Lt. Mandiberg’s flight. When the flak came up, it was fierce. One shell made a direct hit on Mandiberg’s right engine. Continuing to spin, the propeller came off and

flew through the formation. Behind Mandiberg, we flew through a curtain of oil, nuts and bolts.” Postwar comments of John W. Price.

[About ten days went by] “…during which time the Russians insisted that we give them a complete list of all POWs by name, home address, etc. I happened to be

Assistant Housing Officer on Zemke’s staff and had this task as a part of my job. We completed the list, in English, and they said, “Nyet,” demanding that the list be

in Russian. Fortunately, we had ten or twelve men in camp who were fluent in Russian. Working around the clock, we finished this job in around two days.

Zemke’s plan finally came to fruition and we were evacuated by air. We marched the fellows to the airfield, the troop carriers landed, cut one engine, loaded and took

off, taking the men to Camp Lucky Strike in France.

Zemke and his staff, including me, took the last flight out and went straight to Paris where we were billeted in an Air Force hotel. Zemke tried to get air passage for

all of us, but was not successful, as only he had that priority. We hung around Paris for a day or two and then took a train to Lucky Strike.” Postwar comments of

Arnold J. Mandiberg.

Excerpt from Marauder Men, by John O. Moench

Date:
9/27/2004
Time:
10:28 PM

My father, Charles K. Simmons, served as an armourer in the ground crew of “Dottie” (387th/557th), piloted by Russell C. Clarke. Dad rode over on “Queen Mary” in 43

with the majority of the men and was discharged Oct. 45. Could you give me some background on “Dottie,” number of missions, etc. Thanks very much. Tom Simmons

Tom,

41-31871 KS-X “Dottie” served with the squadron right through to the end of the war in Europe completing 164 combat missions.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
9/27/2004
Time:
8:43 PM

I found B26.COM from a Google search on Lewis M. Kranz. I’ve attached a short QuickTime (4535k) | Real Video (554k) clip of a portion of the little dedication ceremony

attended by the surviving members of the Kranz family and about 75 members of the St. Paul’s Residences across the street. It contains Alderman Mell’s remarks about the

generation that produced such men as is shown with Commander Kranz in the 1944 picture at Lubbock. Regarding the picture on your web site titled “US Army Flight School,

1944, Class of 44D, Lubbock Army Airfield, Lubbock, TX”, I would like to supply the following corrections and additional information. According to the widow of Lt.

Lewis M. Kranz, you have him misidentified as being the 5th from the left on the back row (note: correction made). He is actually 4th from the left. You might be

interested to know that today the City of Chicago City Council has dedicated a portion of a street in his honor. Below is the resolution signed by Mayor Richard M.

Daley and Alderman Richard F. Mell. Attached is a copy of the picture taken at the dedication ceremony. His widow, Nina Kranz, is holding a one of the signs. She is

standing next to Ald. Mell. Her grandchildren stand behind her along with her son on the left and his wife.

Sincerely yours,
Stan Hollenbeck

Date:
9/25/2004
Time:
10:28 AM

I am interested in a list of missions for the Ollie L (387th, 557 Squadron) piloted by F/O Charles Hinton. I am also interested in any information regarding his crew

and their children. Thanks, Chuck Hinton, Jr.

Chuck, 41-31717 KS-B “Ollie L” flew 142 combat missions.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
9/25/2004
Time:
8:47 AM

Hello to you all, my name is Colin Wingrave and I am after information about two B26s of the 344th BG, 494th BS, which crashed on March 8th 1944. We excavated the

remains of one of the aircraft in 1975 and now they are on display in our museum in England. I am looking for any information on any of the crew members, ground crews

and family, for full details of which we have at the moment you can view here and read about the excavation in 1975. http://www.aviationmuseum.co.uk/b_26.htm

The names of the crew were as follows:

B26 42-95981
1st Lt. John K. Eckert; Pilot.
2nd Lt. Thomas W. Worrell; Co-Pilot.
1st Lt. George E. Bair; Bombardier.
S/Sgt. Alfred R Border; Engineer/Gunner.
S/Sgt. Lewis O. Thompson; Radio/Gunner.
S/Sgt. Edward J. Powell; Armourer/Gunner

The second aircraft was crewed by:

Captain. Jack W. Miller; Pilot.
2nd Lt. Linwood G. Brooks; Co-Pilot.
1st Lt. James A. Hudson; Bombardier.
S/Sgt. Abraham B. Butler Jr.; Engineer/Gunner.
S/Sgt. George D. McMannamy Radio/Gunner.
S/Sgt. W.J. Summers; Armourer/Gunner.

Any help would be gratefully received.

Colin Wingrave
Thameside Aviation Museum
Coalhouse Fort
East Tilbury
Essex
England

Date:
9/23/2004
Time:
11:22 PM

I am related to S/Sgt Frank H Smigla, who crewed a marauder named mistletoe, I am attempting to locate info on the same marauder such as serial number, aircraft number

as well as completed bombing missions, I believe the a/c had over 100 missions from a photo that I had seen in a 319 bg book, can anyone confirm this info. Regards,

Larrry Smigla
“Mistletoe”, a B-26-B-10-MA of 319th BG 439th BS had serial 41-18303, battle number 60, and completed 118 missions according to added photo. (Large Image)

Regards,
Alf Egil Johannessen
Sandefjord, Norway

Date:
9/19/2004
Time:
11:21 AM

Jack D. Loftin, 397th bomb group, 597th bomb squadron. Based at A72, Peronne, France. Shot down 2/22/45 over Germany. Lost engine due to mechanical failure. Could

not keep up with formation, was hit by 6 German ME 109s. Liberated Sunday, April 29, 1945 by Patton’s third army. All crew members survived.

Jack, you were in B26 43-34410 X2-D target was the Road and Railroad bridge at Rheda, Germany:

Pilot 2.Lt Jack H Festi
Copilot 2.Lt James N Fosby
Bombardier 2.Lt William M Turner
Engineer/gunner Sgt Alfred R Hawpe
Radio/gunner Sgt Clarence A Luck
Armourer/gunner Sgt Jack D Loftin
W Cpl Raymond Hansen

Regards
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
9/18/2004
Time:
10:40 PM

Does anyone remember a B-26 pilot named Clark Tavener? He is my uncle and was listed as missing during the Battle of the Bulge. No further information was ever

received. Jim Harrison

I have Mr. Clark A Tavener, 1st Lt, Serial Number X-XXX331, 575 Bomb Squadron, 391 Bomb Group; Date of Death: 23 Dec 1944; Location: Missing; Awards: AM,15 OLC, PM.

Enlisted State was California. Mr. Tavener is listed as being buried at the Luxembourg American Cemetery http://www.abmc.gov/lx.htm

Mr. Clark A Tavener is unaccounted for. He is probably memorialized on the Tablets of the Missing at Luxembourg American Cemetery.

Circumstances of Loss: On 23 December 1944, a B-26 piloted by 1st Lt Tavener and crewed by the below mentioned airmen, departed A-73 France on a bombing mission over

Ahrweiler, Germany. According to Major Herschel S. Harkins, XXXX065, 1st Lt Tavener’s aircraft was last sighted approximately 3 miles east of Ahrweiler, Germany. Major

Harkins posits that ubiquitous enemy fighters downed 1st Lt Tavener’s plane near that location.

Status and disposition of crew:

1) Tavener, Clark A., 1st Lt, XXXX331: 1st Lt Tavener is unaccounted for.

2) Castle, Mark W., 2nd Lt, XXXX500: 2nd Lt Castle is listed as killed in action in Germany. He is buried at the Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City,

Luxembourg.

3) Wilkinson, Patrick H., 1st Lt, XXXX110: 1st Lt Wilkenson is listed as killed in action in Germany. He is buried at the Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City,

Luxembourg.

4) Wyne, Joseph W., TSgt, XXXX360: TSgt Wyne parachuted safely. He was captured and held POW. He was eventually returned to U.S. control.

5) McGettigan, John F., Cpl, XXXX127: Cpl McGettigan reportedly died in the aircraft as a result of enemy fire. He was reportedly buried by German soldiers in an

isolated grave 5 kilometers west of Lunebach. He was buried at St. Avold Military Cemetery, France, but has since been disinterred and is now interred at Arlington

National Cemetery.

6) Dick, Frank D., Cpl, XXXX100: Cpl Dick parachuted safely. He was captured and held POW. He was eventually returned to U.S. control.

Additional information: In 1948 a U.S. civilian investigator concluded that 1st Lt Wilkinson and 2nd Lt Castle likely survived the crash. Their burial records do not

indicate that their bodies were recovered from the crash, and shrapnel and gunshot wounds to the chest are listed as their causes of death. Their place of death is

listed as Binsfield, Germany, but there is no evidence that 1st Lt Tavener’s aircraft crashed there. Instead, the U.S. investigator proffered that 1st Lt Wilkinson and

2nd Lt Castle tried to make it back to Allied Lines and were caught and killed by Germans. Or, that they made it to Allied lines and died while fighting with the

infantry. If either scenario is true, it is possible that they might have died near Binsfield, which explains why that town is listed as their place of death. In

summation, 1st Lt Wilkinson and 2nd Lt Castle may have died near Binsfield. But, as explained infra, it is not likely where 1st Lt Tavener’s aircraft crashed.

In 1948 a U.S. civilian investigator searched Binsfield, Germany searching for 1st Lt Tavener’s remains. As explained supra, Binsfield was likely searched because 1st

Lt Wilkinson’s and 2nd Lt Castle’s Reports of Death listed that town as their place of death. The investigator interviewed several persons concerning 1st Lt Tavener’s

aircraft crash; they were certain that no Allied aircrafts crashed near Binsfield or in the surrounding area on 23 December 1944. Furthermore, they were unaware of

anyone having parachuted near Binsfield during that time. Based on their information, a U.S. civilian investigator concluded that 1st Lt Tavener did not crash near

Binsfield. The investigator also searched the area between Trois-Vierges – Weiswampach and Heimerscheid but found no trace of 1st Lt Tavener’s plane.

Date:
9/17/2004
Time:
9:13 PM

Marauderman’s Name: William Marshall O’Hara
Bomb Group: 397 BG
Bomb Squadron: 599th BS
Years in service: 42 – 45
Graduation Class: June 26 1942, AFTC
Class Location: Houston, TX
Comments: Served in both the Marines and Air Corps, discharged from the Marines by Senator Alben Barkley, because O’Hara was sole surviving caregiver of his family when

he enlisted. Trained as a pilot, he later served in the 443rd Bombardment Squadron, later reorganized as 320th Bombardment Group (Light). Army Air Force. Enlisted Apr

14, 1942, received Air Medal, 2 Oak Leaf Clusters, Croix de Guerre (unit citation). Served in Rome, Arno, Southern France and Africa. Discharged Sept 1 1945. Gives

birthplace as Mercer Kentucky, Description: Eyes Brown Hair Black, 5′ 9 1/2″ weight 160, 4 dependents. CONFLICT: Birth Certificate says b Muhlenburg co. We have scant

information about him, do not know his plane(s), or others who flew with him. I would like to know any information if there is a Squadron Historian or any other veteran

who remembers any of this. His daughter, Julia O’Hara Mitchel

Julia, you are correct with your father’s service 320th.Bomb Group,443rd.Bomb Squadron. On September 12th 1944 the crew was as follows:

Pilot Capt McKinnon
Copilot 2.Lt O’Hara
Bombardier 1.Lt Wagar
Navigator 1.Lt Underwood
Engineer/gunner S/Sgt Blackwell
Radio/gunner S/Sgt Hammonds
Armourer/gunner Sgt LaFremmie

Regards
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
9/17/2004
Time:
6:46 PM

I am helping a French history teacher who lives and works in Tours, France with his research into the bombing of two railway bridges on either side of Tours. He

happened to get in touch with me some while back as he had found that it was 394th BG who had bombed the eastern bridge at La Frillière and by chance I had written up

in www.littlewaltham.org.uk the trip back to England of some of the 394th BG. As a result, I have been able to help him to advance his research. It may be of passing

interest to you to know that in the larger village of Montlouis near to La Frillière is a stained glass window commemorating the bombing. Now we have found that it was

the 386th BG who bombed the other bridge at La Riche and in turn I find that Major Albert Hill was involved in this action, having looked at pages on your website.

Hence my desire to get in touch with him and possibly extract a bit more information, provided the passing years have not faded the memory too much. Would you pass on

this message and my coordinates to him please. Best regards, Edwin Leach

Date:
9/17/2004
Time:
2:43 PM

My dad, James C. Wells, Sr. (Jimmy Wells), was a Marauder Man with the 320th Bomb Group, 444th Squadron, dates of service, 1944-45, unknown class number, trained at La

Junta, CO, served in Corsica, Sardinia, and France. Unknown number of missions. I do know that when he got is own aircraft, he named it “Frannie’s Fanny”. He’s still

alive and still kickin’ at 81, and if any of you other Marauder Men remember him, I know he’d like to hear about it.

One more thing…….I’d heard that there’s no more Marauders flying……anywhere. Is this correct, and if so, is anyone making any attempts to get another one in the

air? I’m an A&P (danged airplanes get in your blood, don’t they?), and if there’s a project underway somewhere close, I’d LOVE to help out. Jim Wells

James Wells 320th Bomb Group 442nd Bomb Squadron:

Crew Pilot 1.Lt Baker
Copilot 2.Lt Wells
Bombardier 2.Lt Germand
Navigator 1.Lt Moquot
Engineer/gunner S/Sgt Fenton
Armourer/gunner Cpl Denski

Regards
Trevor

Fantasy of Flight , located in Florida, has a fully operational Martin B-26 Marauder – it’s the only B-26 that flies. Near Akron Ohio, at the MAPS Air Museum , there

is a Martin B-26 Marauder being rebuilt. The USAF Air Museum, Dayton, Ohio has the sister ship of the French Marauder located at the Musée de l’Air et de l’Espace,

north of Paris. (Temporarily moved to Omaha Beach)

Date:
9/15/2004
Time:
12:50 PM

My Father, Sgt. Albert Luddeke, was a radio gunner. 391st, 572nd, from 1944-1945. My father is alive and well. I read a posting from Kurt Reed dated April 29, 2004 at

3:11 PM talking about his father John Brice Reed. I believe my father was the radio gunner for Lt. John Reed. Please have Kurt Reed contact me ASAP. I would like to

talk to him about his father. Please pass on this information to Kurt and see if this was his father. If not, I would still like to talk to him.

Pilot REED, JOHN B., 2LT, XXXX976
Copilot STEVENS, HOWARD L., 2LT, XXXX131
Bombardier HILL, RICHARD E., 2LT, XXXX919
Navigator None
Flight Engineer FRANCISCO, BERNARD N., CPL, XXXX6129
Rear Gunner LUDDEKE, ALBERT L., CPL, XXXX9685
Aft Gunner BAILEY, BERNARD W., TSGT, XXXX325

SOURCE: SO-318 HQS, LAKE CHARLES AAF 11/13/1944. These names come from the 572nd Combat Crew Roster of 03/13/45.

The 391st reunion is the last weekend of September 2004 in Kansas City, MO.

Thank you for your help in this matter.

Brett Luddeke (Son of Albert Luddeke)

Date:
9/15/2004
Time:
10:06 AM

My name is Albert Troy Lively, Jr. and my father, Albert T. Lively, was a B-26 pilot in Europe. He flew with the 394th BG, 587th BS. His career began in the U.S. Army

Infantry and when the opportunity arose to transfer to the Air Corps, he jumped at the chance. His training areas included Cuero, TX, Enid, OK, Barksdale AFB in

Shreveport, LA. He flew the required number of missions several times, only to see that number raised just as he approached it. Names that have been heard around the

table and over coffee for many years at our home; Cambrai, France, Venlo, Holland, Chalmsford, England to name a few. Even though at war, these days seemed to be the

best years of his life. Best experiences, best friends, best memories. And above all, he truly loved the B-26. The B dash Crash, as he fondly called it. I can only

remember a few names of his crewmen. Bill Deam, Herb Williams, Buz Buhler, Fred Olson, Chuck Frazier, “Doc” Murray. I would appreciate emails from anyone that flew

with my dad or knew him back then. Thanks. A. T. Lively, Jr.

Bill Deam, Pilot, 394th BG, 587th BS.
Herb Williams, Bombardier, deceased, 394th BG, 587th BS.
Buz Buhler, Pilot, 394th BG, 587th BS.
Fred Olson, unknown
Chuck Frazier, 394th BG, 587th BS., deceased.
“Doc” Murray, unknown

Date:
9/15/2004
Time:
7:39 AM

Congratulations on your fine website honoring the Marauder Men and the aircraft they flew.

My uncle, Edward F. Jefferis, Jr, was the bombardier/navigator of Col. Purinton’s aircraft during the ill-fated 17th May 1943 Mission to Ijmuiden. Thanks for posting

the detailed account of this mission. I was eight years old at that time and this aviator uncle was my hero.

The text on the website says the results of this mission caused the Air Corps to change tactics, from low altitude missions to medium altitude … but nowhere are these

terms explained. So …

SUGGESTION; It would be nice to have sketches with typical mission profiles flown by the B-26 for low altitude missions, medium altitude missions, etc. For example, the

17 May 1943 mission to Ijmuiden evidently was flown inbound at very low altitude, with the aircraft climbing to higher altitude for bomb release. Then I suppose the

plan was to return to low altitude for the outbound flight … but evidently some pilots on the Ijmuiden mission did not do this. An altitude-range sketch of the

different mission profiles would clarify these terms.

Two questions come to mind. First, did Lt. Jefferis fly on the previous mission to Ijmuiden … the one on 14 May 1943 ?

Second, what model B-26 was the aircraft commanded by Col Purinton ? ( This is identified as 41-17979 DR-O on the website. )

Dick Folkerth,

Richard, the answers to your two questions are as follows. Lt Jefferis did not fly the 14th May 1943 mission to Ijmuiden. The B26 flown by the Prurinton crew on the

17th May mission was a B26B-4-MA model. The 14th May and 17th May formations would probably been flown by all B26’s at the same level with slight variations in

individual heights just to clear prop blast from B26’s ahead. Due to the excessive casualties on the 17th May mission 8th.AAF decided that B26’s could no longer

operate at low altitude over Europe due to the strength of the German air defenses. It was not until July 1943 that operations were recommenced and then at altitudes of

between 9,000 to 11,000 feet. Formations were normally flown in strengths of 18 or 36 airplanes with occasional larger formations. Flights consisted of six B26’s in two

three ship formations. A box contained three six ship flights for a 18 ship mission and two boxes of 18 ships for a 36 plane mission. All flights were staggered in

altitude by several hundred feet to give separation for flak avoidance, but still to give defense integrity.

Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
9/10/2004
Time:
11:10 PM

Man from Vijlen walks with Margraten soil to Bastogne

Vijlen (The Netherlands)

The 74 years old Mr. Michel Gulpen from the walking club Jo-Ne will arrive in Bastogne (Belgium) today. Here he will participate in the memorial of the liberation, now

60 years ago.

Mr. Gulpen left last Monday, together with 5 other walkers of the walking club M3F from Plombieres (Belgium) to walk from Henri-Chapelle (Belgium). The walkers will

plant, at the Mardasson monument in Bastogne, an American Oak tree. For this they will use ground from the American cemeteries at Margraten (The Netherlands) and

Henri-Chapelle (Belgium). Eighteen other members of the walking club Jo-Ne will leave today from Vijlen (The Netherlands) by bus to the Ardennes. The will join there

club member for the last 10 kilometers of his walking tour.

Source: Newspaper “De Limburger” September 10, 2004

Translated and submitted by Marcel Bartels

Date:
9/8/2004
Time:
8:18 PM PM

Hi, I am an aviation enthusiast and I am researching a B26 Marauder that crashed in N/Ireland on the 10th of April 1944, the aircraft No is 41-18150 from the 3rd

Replacement and Training Squadron, 3 CCRC USAAF. It flew from Station 236 Toome N/Ireland. Unfortunately the crew of this Marauder perished with the aircraft. The Crew

are as follows:

2nd Lt Howell C Osborne, Jr (Arkansas)
2nd Lt Chester M Turner (Kansas)
Staff Sgt Roy R Cappe Jr (Pennsylvania)
Staff Sgt William J Devenney (Pennsylvania)
Sgt Jimmie Gyovai (Illinois)

If anybody could help with my research or have any Photos of this particular B26 I would be very grateful? With Thanks, Robin R.

Date:
9/8/2004
Time:
1:33 PM

Joseph T Jordan was my Dad. He was a T/Sgt for the Martin Marauder called “Barbara Ann” Web sites list this as a 585th BS ship. I have a Christmas card from France

showing a B-26 flying past the Tower. The return address is clearly 586th Bomb Sqdn, 394th BG. Would like to find out more about my Dad and the Barbara Ann

Diann, 42-96195 4T-P “Barbara Ann” was definitely a 586th.BS plane completing 147 missions.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
9/7/2004
Time:
10:37 PM

The hearts of America go out to the brave men who piloted the B-26 bombers. It is soldiers like you that paved the way for the free American way of life we experience

today. Many sacrificed their lives for what they believe in. Their shed blood will never be forgotten just as the shed blood of our Saviour Jesus Christ.

Freedom comes at a price. Every pilot knew each flight mission could be their last. Their dedication displayed the attitude that that’s O. K. we will be winners whether

we come back or are shot down.

To the B-26 pilots who are still with us or who have gone on to be with the PILOT in the sky.

Again Thanks
Benny Atcheson

Date:
9/6/2004
Time:
10:51 AM

Joseph Gisavage BombGp: 496th Squadron: 344th Years: ’43-’44 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Once again I’m making an appeal to anyone who has any knowledge of Staff

Sergeant Joseph Gisavage who flew with the 496th Bomber Squadron 344th Bomber Group (M) He was killed in action on the 10th June 1944 whilst on a bombing mission over

Valonges Frances. Other crew members were H.L. Burdette, D.W.Edwards, A.L. Collins, S. Billings, M.H. Porter Although I’m not a relative I have ‘adopted’ the gravesite

of Staff Sergeant Gisavage and other crew members who are buried at the American Military Cemetery Colleville sur Mer as a tribute to their sacrifice, and try to visit

the cemetery at least once a year. Since my first visit I have tried to contact relatives of Staff Sergeant Gisavage but so far to no avail. I know he was from

Brooklyn, New York but all the addresses I have are of course 50+ years old. Last year a memorial was dedicated to this crew by the people of Magneville France, and

this year on the 4th June a special ceremony will take place to mark the 60th Anniversary. If there’s anyone out there who has any knowledge of Staff Sergeant Gisavage

or any of the crew members can they please get in touch. I would very much like his relatives to have photographs of this memorial to show them that these brave men

have not been forgotten. Anne Evans

Date:
8/31/2004
Time:
7:05 AM

I’m an aeronautical engineer and aviation history fan; local Municipality charged me to gather info as possible about Air Raids over my town, Erba, northern Italy

(close to Como lake), during WWII on 30 Sept. and 1 Oct. 1944 and, probably, again in the period 30 Jan.-7 Feb.. 1945. For sure I know that 42nd BW, 17th BG, 95th BS

B-26 were involved. I obtained from AFHRA and NARA archives some info and aerial bomb fall plot photos (grid coordinates E-300012, target Erba fuel dump), but any

additional detail like aircraft serials and crew involved (e.g. to realize a realistic B-26 profile) or adding some air photos taken during these very missions will be

great, in order to realize a memorial publication for the 60th anniversary. Also veteran memories remembering those missions will be welcome! Thanks in advance for the

help. Best regards. Raffaele Serio

Date:
8/26/2004
Time:
10:14 PM

Name: Gary Teune
BombGp: 17th Bomb group
Squadron: 95th
Years: 43-46
Location: Chicago, Illinois Comments: I am the son of a B-26 tail gunner, Gary Teune and am trying to get a hold of anyone who knew him. I have pictures of him and his

crew at http://www.teune.com/community/index.php?board=15 , please email me or post a reply there. I would love to talk, and learn more about my father’s service to his

country in WWII, thank you so much. Ed Teune

Date:
8/25/2004
Time:
7:07 AM

Robert Harwell, Pilot, 344th Bomb Group, 497th Bomb Squadron

Date:
8/24/2004
Time:
6:59 PM

Here is a reply to Russ Nehmer who wrote 08-19-2004 for information on Richard Nehmer. Robert R. Nehmer, SNXXXX7333 was a B-26 Radio Op.-Gunner on “Booger Red II”, tail

number 41-31668. The pilot was Charles B. Skipper. Richard was on the original crew who trained in Tampa, Fl. and flew over the North Atlantic in June 1943 with 387th

group, 559th sq.

Date:
8/21/2004
Time:
10:48 PM

Around 22nd August each year I meander down my ole Hall of Memories RE the courageous activities of the French Resistance in WWII–especially their kind help to three

members of a crew in my squadron/flight shot down at Beaumont le Roger, France on 22 August 1943 (386th Gp Mission #8).The three crewmen were brought to nearby Evreux

for medical treatment and/or hiding from the Germans. It was at Evreux where I had the pleasure of knowing a ‘kingpin’ of the Resistance, Monsieur Meneau, while I was

stationed at Evreux-Fauville Air Base during 1954-58. He clearly remembered the three airmen, and brought me a photo of my bunkmate, flight engineer-gunner S/Sgt. Wm.

Callahan, along with the serial number of the downed aircraft.

I have a photo of Meneau and the ‘kingpin’ of the FFI of the Paris region, Rol-Tanguy, who operated in secrecy from the bowels of Paris’ 300 miles of underground sewers

and catacombs, where Rol-Tanguy had communications by phone to 250 posts of the Water and Sewer Administration. Resistance in any form was highly dangerous business.

There were over 100,000 collaborators in the Paris region, and over 1,000,000 collaborators were arrested throughout France between 21 August and 1 October 1944.

The Resistance was organized into about a dozen different entities. One highly effective group during 1943-44 was the SNCF, the Societe Nationale des Chemins de Fer,

the nationalized railways. These cheminots were mainly members of Communist or Socialist unions and parties…specializing in sabotaging the rail system

schedules/rails…and blowing up the right train at the right time. By knowing the route and speed of a train carrying both German cars and French cars, they were able

to compute/set timers to detonate dynamite under the German cars in the train. By the time the Allies landed in Normandy, some 65% of the railway system in the region

had been rendered useless to the Germans.

A bit of irony concerning my bunkmate, S/Sgt. Wm. Callahan… He was captured at the Spanish Border by the Germans when they shook the train down. Almost 7 years to the

day after Callahan was shot down, I checked into Barksdale AFB as a new 2/Lt. aircraft maintenance officer (SAC) and was issued my weapon (carbine) by one each M/Sgt.

Wm. Callahan.

Billie B. Boyd, Jr.
386th Bomb Group
554th squadron (1942-44)
Billie Boyd shot down a FW-190 during the 386th Group mission number 008. On 386th Group mission number 025 he shot down another FW-190. In later years he received a

battle field commission–he retired with the rank of Major.
Chester P. Klier–Historian, 386th B.G.

Date:
8/20/2004
Time:
10:54 PM

Marauderman’s Name: Lewis H. Shuler
Bomb Group: BG 319
Bomb Squadron: Sqn 440
Years in service: 3 1/2 yrs
Graduation Class: unknown
Class Location: Roswell N.M.
Comments: I went thru B26 transition at Barksdale Field La. Crewed up and left for combat thru Hunter Field Ga. I took half the cruise via Ship. Landed in

Casablanca Christmas day 1944. Spent some time waiting on the flying part of our crew to arrive. Upon their arrival we flew our 26 to Sardinia to join the the 319th.

I was a bombardier/navigator did nor Fly with my original crew. I was in the MTO and a member of Col. Randy’s “Flying Circus”. I flew 65 combat missions and survived

two crash landings. We had an excellent record of hitting the targets so we were called on to bomb some very sensitive targets such as Rome RR, Florence RR Yards the

Abby Monte Casino, Invasion of Southern France, Po River bridges etc. We switched over to B25s and flew my last two missions in them. Left the group in December 1945.

I had a lot of points and was in one the first groups to get out. I rejoined my old company. Retired after 45 years with them and am living in a retirement village.

Lewis, nice to hear from a 319th bomb group veteran, but how about telling us at b26.com some more about your experiences during the course of your 65 combat missions.

When did you join the Group and when did you return to the ZI.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
8/19/2004
Time:
10:23 PM

I am looking for information about my grandfather, Charles M. Nunally, of Baxter TN. The few things that I know are that he was a B-26 pilot with the 9th Air Force,

322nd BG, 450th BS based out of Maidenhead, England. He ultimately received the Distinguished Flying Cross for his actions. Any information would help fill in the gaps.

Thanks for your help. Regards, Charles M. Nunally III, Captain, U.S. Marine Corps

Date:
8/19/2004
Time:
7:16 AM

Marauderman’s Name: Richard Nehmer
Bomb Group: 387th
Bomb Squadron: 559th
Years in service: WWII
Graduation Class: unknown
Class Location: Europe
Comments: I am looking for any information from anyone that may have been with Richard Nehmer in WWII. He was with the 9th Air Force, 387th Bomb Group, 559th Bomb

Squadron making runs over Germany. I am doing a military family tree on family members and there service for our great country. I know he was a Marauder man, but belly

gunner or radio?? Any other helpful info or photo of plane/crew would be great. Thank you. Russ Nehmer

Date:
8/17/2004
Time:
10:22 PM

I am sending you the history of the 69th Bomb Sqdn, 38th Bomb Gp. The copy is poor but I hope it is of some use to you. My copy is so old its about ready to fall apart.

This was written in late Spring 1943 by a new 2nd Lt and he did not include the names of the Enlisted Men who were Radio Operators from Patterson Field, Ohio to Hawaii

in May 1942. I was one of those Radio Operators and can state that without a doubt had those planes not had radio operators some would not have made it. We had two

navigators aboard between California, and Hickam Field and we still got lost. Same going to Christmas Island, Fiji and New Caledonia. I don’t blame the Navigators for

they were probably as poorly trained the radio operators. Although I enlisted in Nov 1940 and had gone to radio school I had very little flight time when the war

started. I probably had only flown 4 or 5 times in a B-26 before we left Ohio. We had on the job [self] training. Although I went to gunnery school it did not amount to

much. Aerial gunnery was firing a 30cal machine gun at a tow target from the rear seat of an AT6 trainer. My gun position in B-26s and B-25s was the upper turret and

had 50 cal guns. I never fired those guns until we were overseas. I don’t think people realize just how poorly prepared for war the Army Air Corps was in 1941-42. I

think the Japanese knew. The photo is of our plane “Oh 81” as we called her. The Pilot named her “Yap Trap”. The co-pilot he named her “Blackjack”. If you look close

you can see the torpedo rack they installed on our planes. Two of our planes were in the Battle of MIDWAY. One was lost at the battle site and the other crash-landed at

Midway. Although we took off and landed with torpedoes we never dropped one. Thank the Lord. We did enough of that low altitude stuff with B-25s. I have raddled on

long enough. I hope this history is of some use to you. Sincerely, Merv Neis

Date:
8/16/2004
Time:
7:32 PM

I am writing seeking any information you may be able to compile regarding my father’s WW II B-26 bomb group/squadron, his missions, crew members etc.

Name: Lt. George E. Lyons
Class 43J ?
B-26 pilot, US AAC
344 Bomb Group
394? Squadron
Based at Stansted Field, England from approx Feb 1944 to June 1944

June 4 1944, flying as copilot (with John Pikula as pilot), B-26 crashed shortly after take-off from Stansted, my father survived crash but with severe burns to hands

and face. He was sent back to US for convalescence. Discharged with rank of Captain about 1 year later.

I am also interested to learn what may have caused both B-26 engines to suddenly quit or lose power shortly after the landing gear were raised. Are there any records

that would show the official cause of the crash?

Thank you.
Mark C. Lyons

Date:
8/16/2004
Time:
6:30 PM

My father-in-law, Lt. James F. Gray, flew with the 323 BG/456th BS in World War 2. Last week, his daughter lovingly removed two of his prized photos of the war from

their frames. We did this to have them digitized for posterity and so I could post them here and to other B-26 sites. From the narrative he wrote on the back we know

that this first shot is of his plane releasing bombs on a mission in late 1943 or early 1944. The mission was against Nazi V-1 or “Buzz Bomb” launching sites. The next

shot is of his crew and himself, presumably planning for the mission. They are, from left to right, again from the narrative he wrote, Delisso-Waist Gunner, J.

Johnson-Tail Gunner, H.L. Hanson-Top Turrett, C.B. Buttler-Bombideer and J.F. Gray-Pilot. In this case I copied his spellings exactly. After arriving in England and

flying one mission his co-pilot refused to fly again so for the rest of the war the “Kactus Kid” had no co-pilot. From a Marauder Men by John O. Moench, 1999 published

by Malia Enterprises, Inc., I discovered that 1st Lieutenant James F. Gray, flew with the 323rd Bomb Group the 456 Squadron on D-Day. I believe he spent his entire time

in the ETO with this group. We are not sure if he completed a normal tour of duty before being sent back to the states, or after being wounded by flack he was sent back

to the states. His grandson, my son, thinks he said he completed 99 missions and I seem to remember him saying 80+. I am pretty sure he was back in the US when the

group moved to France. J.F., as he liked to be called, died in December 1996. Any information about him, his crew or his plane will be appreciated by the family.

Date:
8/15/2004
Time:
4:16 PM

Marauderman’s Name: Eckard Munsch
Bomb Group: 387
Bomb Squadron: 559
Years in service: 1943-1944
Comments: To Michele Pusateri Nichols: I would love to have a copy of the Missing Airman Crew Report (MACR 11482) for the December 23, 1944 crash of The Front Burner

II. I have pictures of the funeral at Jefferson Barracks on September 22, 1949. I also have a letter in German from a resident of Junkerath who describes the plane as

it landed in his back yard. If you would like copies I would be happy to send them to you. Please contact Mike for my email address. Sharon Leezer

Date:
8/15/2004
Time:
11:50 AM

344th Bomb Group, Flight Crew of Lead Aircraft, D-Day, 6 June 1944. Cherbourg Peninsula on the beaches at Beau Guillot, La Madeleine, and at Martin de Varreville.

Capt. James P. Parish, Lead Bombardier; Major Jens A. Norgaard, Pilot and Formation Leader; 2nd Lt. Loris D. Gniffke, Navigator. Lt. Col. Robert W. Witty, Co-Pilot and

Deputy Group Commander; 1st Lt. Louis Offenberg, Lead Navigator; S/Sgt. Kenneth Hobbs, Engineer/Gunner; S/Sgt. Jules S. Theobald, Tail Gunner; T/Sgt. John R. Leach,

Radio Operator/Gunner.

Date:
8/13/2004
Time:
8:51 PM

I saw the notice in B-26 Guest Book asking for data concerning a 323rd Bomb Group raid to Holland on December 13, 1943. The 322nd, 323rd, 386th, and 387th Bomb Groups

all took part in that raid. They were the only B-26 Groups operational in England at that time. Each Group put up 36 aircraft. All groups bombed in continuous fashion.

Just forty minutes later those same Group’s each put up 18 aircraft on the same target.

The target was the airdrome located at Amsterdam Schiphol, Holland (example) – not Amsterdam Beach as stated in your e-mail request. The 323rd Group had 31 out of 36

planes battle damaged, I have no record of any planes shot. On the second mission of the day the 323rd Group listed six men wounded, no planes of theirs shot down. My

386th Group had one plane shot down and 17 damaged on the second raid. I believe your date for a 323rd plane shot down on December 13th was in error. On November 3,

1943, they lost a plane to flak on the bomb run. My 386th Group was flying directly behind them on the bomb run. That joint mission was also flown to Amsterdam

Schiphol, Holland. A story concerning all of the above missions can be found on my web page as listed below.

Both missions flown by the 323rd and other Groups on December 13, 1943 can be found on my web page by clicking on my combat missions number 054 and 055. The mission

flown by the 323rd Group and others on November 3, 1943 can be found by clicking on combat mission number 037.

My information shows that Bombardier Lloyd E. Kisner flew with his pilot Richard E. Robinson in aircraft Number 781 YU-V in the 455th Bomb Squadron, 323rd Bomb Group.

You mentioned that you wish to contact Bud Hutton concerning a story he wrote in the “Stars And Stripes Newspaper about the Amsterdam Schiphol mission. I had no contact

with him, but I can tell you that he and Andy Rooney (60 Minutes TV Program) just after the war ended co-authored a book called, “Air Gunner” Both Hutton and Rooney

were staff writers for the “Stars And Stripes Newspaper during the war. Hutton flew four or five missions with the 323rd Bomb Group. Rooney flew three missions with the

386th Bomb Group, he and I shared one of those missions. I have been in contact with him in recent years.

Sincerely,
Chester P. Klier – Historian, 386th Bomb Group

Date:
8/13/2004
Time:
7:57 PM

Hello, Vincent J. Tabacco, Bombardier, who was in the 320th/444th. If anyone reading this remembers my father – and wouldn’t mind responding. Please contact me.

Date:
8/13/2004
Time:
6:59 AM

S/Sgt Lacey A. Schrader, 17th BG, 432nd BS, Navigator/Bombardier. Crashed in the Mediterranean Sea 11 March 1943. Lacey might have been known to his friends as “Ace.”

He had a great potential as an artist, which may be remembered by any of his friends. I am his brother Bill and I’d like to hear from anyone who knew him.

Date:
8/11/2004
Time:
6:38 PM

Don Wilson, Pilot, 17th Bomb Group. Flying school was completed at Yuma, AZ in July ’43 after primary at Thunderbird II and basic at Marana, AZ. Then to Del Rio where

we got familiar with the 26 and on to Barksdale for operational training. Half way through crew training I entered the hospital for surgery, recovered from that and

recuperating was assigned to duty with Base Operations. Before I could get another crew the first surgery went afoul and back to the hospital for another try. While

awaiting another crew I was assigned instructor pilot duties for a few months and then got a final crew which we sharpened up and left “Barfdale” January ’45, boarded a

water vessel (the worse voyage of my life on a Brit liner the Mauritania) Disembarked into Stoke on Trent where I went straight into the hospital with a nasty cold

acquired huddling on the spray and rain swept deck of that ship while the good captain made “a clean sweep fore and aft” twice a day. Even sick I was happy to be off

that ship. From England went to a replacement depot in Paris (and by air mind you!!). Then joined the 95th squadron of the 17th BG at Dijon. Although I had been in

uniform by this time nearly four years I was afraid the war would be over before I could participate. That didn’t happen and I flew 21 missions before VE day after

which we folded up our tents and flew people and baggage to Florens, Belgium where we spent the summer of ’45 flying about two practice missions a month. In the fall

the unit moved to Schleisheim near Munich to, as the authorities said, ” occupy Germany for 20 years”. I just couldn’t imagine my being there that long so tried in vain

to get out and into the Pacific foray but had no A’26 time (as some of our more fortunate guys were able to sneak in with other groups). So sit and count our points and

wait and the final irony was flying our planes, some with less that a hundred hours, onto an empty pasture and watching the army place detonation charges and blow them

up. To rub salt into our wounds we were loaded onto 40×8 boxcars and ever so slowly made out way to La Havre, wait a week and board a real ship for NY. It was like a

luxury cruise. A troop carrier ship operating by our good navy crews and with the best food one could wish for. And the so very sympathetic captain allowed we dog

owners to bring our pets on board, assigned them a “locker” along with a couple sailors to feed and care for the dogs while the captain demanded only that we walk them

on the deck a couple times a day. From NY we railroaded to Jackson MS where some received discharges while others, including myself, got other assignments: none of

which were in the Pacific. For many years I’ve been in contact with our engineer. James Barnes, of FL: I had martini lunch with the bombardier, Harry Menkin of CA ten

years ago: and I had a letter from radio operator Flewharty of Dallas ten years ago but can no longer find him. I did locate our tail gunner, Gary Teune, from Chicago

many years ago. The only missing one is co-pilot Charles Darling of Boston. All those good men left the service, entered and succeeded in their individual careers, and

raised good families. I miss all of them and if anybody knows how I might contact them please advise me. It was indeed a “good war”, at least for some of us and after

nearly 60 years reflection, and our luck to survive it Much of the appreciation for our luck was attributable to the reliable and tough Marauder. I’ve flown many types

since but never felt the same attachment as I feel for the champion of them all. Don Wilson

Date:
8/11/2004
Time:
2:14 PM

On Saturday, October 16, there will be a dedication of monument to honor the 323rd Bomb Group while they were stationed at Laon-Athies. The granite monument will be

placed in Samoussy, a town adjacent to the former airfield. If you are interested in attending, please contact us, Lou and Carleton Rehr. Also we would like to present

a photo album showing the life of our airmen while stationed there. If you have any photos you would like us to use, please contact us. Thanks. Lou and Carleton Rehr

Date:
8/11/2004
Time:
9:04 AM

Hello, my father John H. Steele, was a Ordnance officer for one of the squadrons of the 322. I recently inherited a negative archive that contains lots of Photos from

his service. It features a B-26 “Mild and Bitter” quite prominently, and a friend identified that as a 322 aircraft. He had loads of interesting tales and did

participate in some missions. Michael J. Steele

Date:
8/8/2004
Time:
1:21 PM

Marauderman’s Name: TSgt James Mecum
Bomb Group: 344th BG
Bomb Squadron: 497th BS
Years in service: 5
Graduation Class: ?
Class Location: MacDill AF
Comments: I honor of my wife’s Grand Dad, James E. Mecum, March 27, 1920 to Nov. 26, 2003. Radio Operator on the “Hard to Get” under the command of Lt. Col. Delwin Dale

Bentley. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II, flying 52 missions in a B-26 Martin Marauder. He received a Purple Heart, Distinguished Service

Cross, Silver Star and a French Croix De Guerre in service to our country. Aaron Fischbach, 2dLt, USAF

Date:
8/7/2004
Time:
8:33 AM

Dear B-26 Men: I am writing for my father, John “Dusty” Rhoads of Lansdale, PA, who passed away in 1996. I am sketchy on the details of his time in Europe; however,

this much I do know! He was a B-26 pilot. His plane was named Smokey Stover after the Sunday funny paper strip of the same name. He painted the nose cone art on his

plane and on his flight crew’s jackets (of which, I have his original). He, as I was told, flew 55 missions, He was stationed in England, thus, his love of darts and

scotch! I have B&W photos and other memorabilia from his tour and his training in Pensacola, FL. I will share with whomever to help complete the saga of the “Forgotten

9th”. Especially, the brave men who never got the glory of the B-17’s or the B-24’s, but, who had to maneuver a lighter, more powerful and faster bomber. B-26 men know

what I mean – – – the “Baltimore Whore”, the “Widow Maker”, and “Flak Bait”. The B-26, as my father told me, was one “Helluva Woman”! She would give you everything she

had and could perform!!!! But, you had to know how to handle what she gave you – – – and temperamental, YES!!!! Anyway, please advise if any of his crew is still alive

– or – if you have anything in archives on his plane and tour. Also, please advise where I might send photos and other information to help fill the void that exists in

this unheralded story. On my part, I will try to locate more information on squadron, plane markings, and serial number. Regards, John E. Rhoads, Jr. – – – Proudly!

Date:
8/6/2004
Time:
10:13 PM

Mike, I want to thank you for getting me in touch with our co-pilot Charles Darling of your neighborhood. Called yesterday and had a half hour of good conversation with

him and fortunately found him and his in good condition. I’m mailing him a copy of the Air Battle of Bavaria today along with lots of Sortie issues and a video prepared

some years ago by a member of he 320th (I believe), a sister group of the 17th. He has been completely out of the loop for these 59 years so has lots of catching up to

do and sounds very interested so we will give him all possible assistance.

Thanks very much,
Don Wilson

You’re welcome Don! B26.COM is very successful connecting ol’ Marauder Men buddies back together again. For those who “get it”, the web site is a great tool! MS

Date:
8/5/2004
Time:
10:21 PM

Name: Captain Robert S. Heppe (Deceased)
Bomb Group: 323 BG
Squadron: 454 BS
Years in Service 43-46
Class Unknown

My dad was a bombardier/navigator who flew 54 missions with the 454th BS of the 323rd BG. His plane was shot up and hobbled into S. England on trim tabs on 20 May 44

after a second raid (on consecutive days) on Dieppe, 2 1/2 weeks later he flew on D-Day (Utah Beach). He and his friend/pilot, then LTC (now COL) Marion Morgan, who

was nominated for Medal of Honor on Dieppe raid, were denied permission to fly under the Eiffel Tower. He flew with Lt (now MG) Moench on 14 Feb 45. He earned the

Soldiers Medal for helping to save his crew at Dieppe, the Distinguished Flying Cross, and 9 Air Medals. I was bounced out of Army flight program for being colorblind

(got INF instead) but my son, 1LT Adam Heppe, West Point ’02, now flies an Apache in Balad, Iraq.

Robert S. Heppe, Jr.
COL, JA, USAR

Robert, You seem to have a very good record of your fathers B26 career, how about telling us at b26.com more about him. We would have his missions in our archive, but

not his personal experiences. How about sharing those with us. Regards, Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Thank you for posting Mr. Heppe. Your family is an example for all of us. You are the BEST! MS

Date:
8/5/2004
Time:
7:02 AM

I’m searching for a picture of a B26B, 117648, which was at Willow Run for testing with the Ford-built P&W in 1942-43 when a good friend and mentor was assigned to it

as flight test engineer. His pilot was Charles Lindbergh. Another good friend, Bill (Subsonic) Yeager flew B26s in Africa early on and regaled me with some of his

missions, if you are at all interested. Bill, then a copilot, won his DFC by saving the crew after the pilot was incapacitated by attacking Bf 109s. He bellied it in,

which was a dicey bit of flying. I have some photos and his logbooks. Bill is the guy who first got a line on the B26 now in the AF Museum.

The Charles Lindbergh is the one who flew the “Spirit of St. Louis” to Paris in 1927. By 1942, he had fallen out of favor with the powers that be, namely Pres. FDR, who

refused to let him serve with the military. So Lindbergh went to work for Ford as a test pilot. That’s how he became involved with the B26B, 117648. Lindbergh logged

about 50 hours on 117648, making several long XCs, including one to the West Coast. He visited Lockheed at Burbank and got checked out in in the P-38 and did the same

with a PB2Y in San Diego. My good friend and mentor, Channing Clark, was hired at about the same time as Lindbergh. He served as Lindbergh’s flight engineer on many

occasions, including the B26 trip to the West Coast. Bill Yeager, later known as “Subsonic” Yeager, when he was posted to Wright Field with Chuck Yeager, was assigned

to B-26s in 1942. At first they terrified him, because there were so many training accidents, but he grew to love it in combat. I’ll send you some stuff on how he won

his medal. I have some photos, too. Bill died about ten years ago, at the vet’s hospital at or near Wright-Pat. He was much involved with the AF Museum and was

instrumental in finding the B26 they have on display. If I remember correctly, it was an executive airplane when he found it, probably in a derelict state, while

flying as a corporate pilot.

John Underwood

John, I have searched through my photographic files and have come up with a negative result. I am sorry but I do not have a photograph of 41-17648. You may care to

know that 41-17648 went on to serve in the training system moving progressively to Burbank, Ca; Fort Worth, Ypsilante, Romulus; Dodge and Tinker where it was struck off

charge September 20,1943.

Regards
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
8/4/2004
Time:
6:54 AM

Hi – a good friend, Tom Charles recently died. I gave his eulogy. He was a B-26 copilot, maybe a pilot as well with a group out of England starting around D-Day and

thru the Ardennes. I do not know his group. Any suggestions to trace him down with only a name? W. John Phillips

Date:
8/2/2004
Time:
10:06 PM

I am searching for information regarding a crash on takeoff that happened on May 27th 1944 in 319th bomb Group. Do you have any info? Lynn Walch, Marauder Man

Dear Mr. Walch, On May 27th 1944 B26 battle No. 30 of the 438th.Bomb Squadron crashed, burned and exploded when the pilot Harry E Pence raised the gear too soon. All

the crew escaped safely, however the Group ambulance lost all its windows in the explosion. Doc Gorlin was beside the plane when he started to run away. Later asked why

he didn’t use the ambulance to escape the blast he replied “I didn’t want to be hampered by anything with wheels”.

Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
8/2/2004
Time:
4:02 PM

Marauderman’s Name: James L. Alexander, Staff Sergeant; Bomb Group: 323, Bomb Squadron: 453; Years in service: 5, Graduation Class: ? Class Location: ? Comments: My

father was from West Monroe, LA (died 1999). I know he was with the group at least from Myrtle Beach, Valenciennes and Leon, France, and Landsberg, Germany. I have

picture of a group picture at Landsberg dated 13, Aug. 1945; also other pictures of pubs in England (Earls Colne), and with names of Kouba, Harold J. Brothers, Biddle,

Rehr, C.D. Helper, “C.D.” Wingingham, E. Dorfman, T.R. Allen from Memphis TN, Robert Knoles, and Joe Nakles (or Iyakles). Can anyone tell me about the thumbs up patch?

Date:
8/2/2004
Time:
8:24 AM

Leslie A. Tenold, 322nd Bomb Group, 451 Bomb Sqdn., Operations Officer of the 451 Bomb Squadron, 59 missions. I was one of the original members of the 322nd. We flew

the southern route to England. I was given a regular commission after the war and I retired on 1 September, 1966 after a total of 30 years. I joined Lockheed at

Marietta, Georgia in their Research Laboratory, then retired from Lockheed on 1 March 1984. LES

Date:
7/29/2004
Time:
8:21 PM

I was a radio operator-gunner on a B-26 crew that left Patterson Field in May 1942. The pilot was Cliff Johnston; Co-Pilot John Tkac and Navigator Seifried. Tail

number was—081. At that time we were members of the 69th Bomb Sqdn, 38th Bomb Group. We arrived at Hickam Field the day of the Battle of Midway – June 6 I think.

Two planes proceeded us by about 10 days and took part in that battle. One plane and crew were lost and the other crash landed back at Midway. The 69th was sent to

New Caledonia were we met the ground people. We kept B-26s until about Jan 1943 when we got B25s All of combat mission the 69th flew when we had B-26s were flown out

of Guadalcanal. Many times we carried torpedoes but never dropped them in combat. Lucky I guess. Merv Neis

Date:
7/29/2004
Time:
6:49 PM

Hello !
On August 4th 1944, B-26 Nr 42-107726 crashed, during a bombardment mission south of France. The 7 French airmen crew was KIA. The Bomb group was 2/52 Franche-Comté

(C.O. Cl Badré), one of the groups of the 42nd US Bomb Wing (C.O. Gral Webster). On August 28th 1944, at the same place: the village of Valdeblore, Alpes-Maritimes,

France, a young Spitfire pilot from the 93rd R.A.F. Fighter Squadron was also KIA.

60 years later, on August 7th, we shall commemorate: the French Armée de l’air, the British Royal Air Force, the US-Air Force, will send important delegations. The

government of Canada, United Kingdom, USA and France will be represented. The American Legion, the Royal British Legion, and 20 French Veterans association will be

represented. A 3 meters high monument, shaped like a wing will be unveiled by the sisters and brother of one of the crew.

Side by side, the Allies will stand, just the same way they did during the bad times, when they also fought and sometimes died side by side for our freedom.

We don’t forget.

Please, if you can let it be known to some B-26 veterans, especially from the 42nd US Bomb Wing, or the 93rd British Fighter squadron, do it.

Ceremonies will take place in Valdeblore, France, at 3 PM, on Saturday August 7th.

Jean-Charles de POLI
In charge of the commemoration ceremonies in Valdeblore – France

The exact location is Valdeblore, 60 Km north of NICE. Take the A-8 highway to Nice. Then Exit Nr 52. Drive 26 km to the north on N 202 direction DIGNE-GRENOBLE. Then

make a right, on D 2205 direction AURON -ISOLA, for 20 Km more. Then make a right on D 2565 direction VALDEBLORE – RIMPLAS. Drive carefully for a last 10 Km and there

you are. (about 75 minutes drive from exit 52).

Date:
7/28/2004
Time:
9:42 PM

Dear Sirs, May I congratulate you on your site about the B-26 Marauder. I am carrying out historical researches regarding the city of Palermo during World War II and I

have read that on May 9, 1943 the Capt. Richard B. Dana Elliott of 442nd Bomber Squadron, 320 Bomber Group was shot down in the raid against Palermo. I’d like to know

the Serial Number of the airplanes shot down in the raid. Would it be possible to know who was the commanding Officer of raid? How many B-26 Marauder were employed in

the attack and which Squadrons were involved? I would also like to know whether the Marauder’s Bomber Group were involved in other similar missions on Palermo. If

possible I would appreciate receiving photos regarding such actions, also against payment of fees if necessary. I thank you very much in advance and look forward to

your reply. Yours sincerely, Alessandro Bellomo. I would greatly appreciate if you can also send to me your reply by e-mail.

COMMANDERS. Maj John F Batjer, 1 Jul 1942; Col John A Hilger, c. 5 Aug 1942; Col Flint Garrison Jr, 25 Oct 1942; Lt Col John Fordyce, 15 Feb 1943; Col Karl E

Baumeister, 25 May 1943; Lt Col Stanford Gregory, 25 Sep 1943; Col Eugene B Fletcher, 25 Oct 1943; Col Ashley E Woolridge, 2 Nov 1944; Lt Col Blaine B Campbell, 28 May

1945-unkn.

Date:
7/27/2004
Time:
7:30 PM

What a terrific web site. I have learned more from this site, than what my father and uncle have told me about WWII and the death of my Uncle Roy. My uncle, SGT Roy

Long, was a member with the 559th Bomber Squad, 387th Bomber Group. I never had the honor to meet him, he was killed in a crash landing on Nov 30,1944. If I had the

opportunity, I would have thanked him for his bravery and courage in WWII. I believe this can be accomplish by thanking all of you who fought for freedom without

questions or second thought. Thank you for your losses and accomplishments.

On a mission to Zweibruchen 30 Nov 44 (flying B-26 “Old Crow”); crashed. The following crew members were reported killed: 2nd.Lt Norman J. Hollekim*; 2nd Lt. Robert E.

Hill* ; 2nd Lt. Robert B. Morse*; Sgt. Roy V. Long*; S/Sgt. Ernest E. Shehan*; Sgt. Mark V. Carmichael

Mr. Roy V Long is buried in the Epinal American Cemetery, France; Plot B-30-37.
* Designates buried in Epinal American Cemetery, France.
Source: 559th Squadron History; B-26 Memorial Guide

Date:
7/27/2004
Time:
10:41 AM

I decided to surf the B26 site. I wish to congratulate the Staff of B26.com on receiving the Certificate of Recognition from the US Army. Mike I enjoyed reading in the

Sortie of your trip to the B26 archives at U of Akron. I’m always amazed at the efforts to keep alive the accomplishments & memories of the Marauder folks. As life

moves on I better realize a bit more of the vastness of the WW2 events and not only the US involvement but also of the upheaval of a large part of the world. The

unbelievable number of people caught up with the battle of mankind that has not ended with the end of WW2. That generation touched or ended so many normal lives even

those that survived. I am appalled at the increased difficulty to make a contact with those that were a part of my WW2 family. To record some of this for my family has

been a mixed task for me. Efforts as yours & others effort may encourage me to organize my hundreds of pages of notes about my personal experiences of WW2. As I was 18

when it started & 21 at the conclusion of this experience, the time may have arrived for me to complete this documentation. Since I have passed the age of 80 a family

member has recognized my writing plight. A niece has offered to move me through these writings of WW2 events as I still remembered them vividly. I know that I saw &

understood so little of this big WW2 saga; however it is time to put another minuscule record to rest. Max Petrisek, Marauder Man, 17th Squadron
Date:
7/27/2004
Time:
6:47 AM

Date:
7/26/2004
Time:
9:30 PM

Roy Leonard Rice, Jr., USAAF, 451st bomb squadron, 322nd bomb group, medium. Died on Sunday, March 18, 1945 at Beauvais when planes were forming up for a mission.

Through an apparent error in judgment, 2 planes collided and exploded, bringing another down with the explosions. All crew members of the 3 planes, except 1 pilot were

killed. Buried at the Epinal American Cemetery, Epinal, Vosges, France, Plot B, Row 7, Grave 64. Awarded Air Medal with 4 Oak Leaf clusters. Posted photo on

www.wwiimemorial.com/registry. My mother-in-law is his widow. I noticed with interest a posting of 6/22/04 at 8:02 pm by Judy – she is related to Lester E. Barton, who

was also killed in the crash. Sue Pearson

Date:
7/26/2004
Time:
7:30 AM

Marauderman’s Name: Bud Hutton, report for Stars and Strips, Bomb Group: 323, Bomb Squadron: 455, Years in service: 1943–1946, Graduation Class: ? Location: Amsterdam

Beach, Holland, Comments: Looking for issue of Stars and Strips between 12-43 and 7-44 with article written by Bud Hutton, reporter, about Lloyd E Kisner bombardier’s

crew when shot down on a mission of bombing Amsterdam Beach, Holland 12-13-1943 . Hutton was a member of the 455-323 squad. Can any one tell me how I can get in touch

with the war reported Bud Hutton. If he is still alive or does anyone have a copy that might have the mission. Thanks, L. E. Kisner

Date:
7/23/2004
Time:
10:05 PM

I have just recently found your very valuable and informative site that deals with Marauder Men. My father was a co-pilot and pilot of a B26 in WWII based in England.

Unfortunately he passed away in 1972 and like so many of the men and women who fought in WWII he chose not to talk about his experiences. I appreciate the fact that,

since the early 1990’s, those who served in WWII, the Greatest Generation, have been encouraged to share their stories and experiences with their children, grand

children, and great grandchildren. I would like to find out how to get in touch with and/or information about the 575 Bomb Squadron – 391 Bomb Group. My father,

Clarence Erickson, had 68 missions according to records that I recently found in and old trunk. I have also recently found some letters that my father wrote to an aunt

and his grandmother throughout the years he was in he service from 1941-1945. They too were found in a box that had been placed away for “safe keeping”. Please direct

me to any sources or people who you think may be able to help me “fill-in” some blank spaces that my sisters and I have concerning our father’s time as a Marauder

pilot. Thank-you, Rich

Rich, Your father was copilot to 1st Lt Raymond B Smith in B26 42-95854 when they flew the South Atlantic route to the United Kingdom. However on his first combat

mission the crew consisted of the following men:

1.Lt N E Fleck Pilot
2.Lt Clarence V Erickson Copilot
2.Lt F J Murphy Bombardier/Navigator
T/Sgt B B Bridgewater Radio/gunner
S/Sgt E L Martin Engineer/gunner
S/Sgt W F Reagan Armourer/gunner

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
7/22/2004
Time:
7:07 AM

Help Wanted – We are looking for relatives or friends of the following Marauder Men. A wooden cross at the crash site is being replaced during a commemoration ceremony

for the B-26 Marauder crew that was shot down on March 18, 1945 near Stadecken Germany in a suburb called Frei-Weinheim. Plane No. 42-96160 was U2-L “Billie Willie V”

from the 598th.BS 397th.BG. The pilot, 1st Lt. Ronald F. Shepard, is buried at Lorraine American Cemetery, France. Plot location B-27-26.
1.Lt Ronald F. Shepard, Pilot; F/O William R. Littenal, Co-Pilot; S/Sgt Harold E. Wilson, Bombardier; Sgt Hoyt B. Willingham, Radio/Gunner; Sgt James H Tamplin,

Engineer/Gunner; Sgt Herbert Brodsky, Armourer/gunner; T/Sgt J C McGuire, Observer

Date:
7/20/2004
Time:
10:20 PM

Merlin Garton, Pilot, 397th BG, 596th BS. My name is Kelly Lowman. My grandfather, Merlin Garton, was a B-26 pilot in WWII. I have a neat “yearbook” of the 397th

Bomb Group as well as an article of his receiving the “distinguished flying cross” for a mission on D-Day where he was in support of the seaborne assault on the

Normandy beaches–according to the article, “he ran into heavy flak on the bombing run over the target when the low ceiling forced him to go in at only 2,000 feet. The

German fire knocked out one engine, but Lt. Garton was able, after getting his bomb load away, to nurse his crippled ship safely back to England.” I am curious if

anyone remembers him. I thank you for keeping the memory alive. Sincerely, Kelly Lowman

My father, Sterling Hoch, flew many missions with Lt. Garton where my father was the pilot and Lt. Garton was the co-pilot. After returning from Europe, they both were

assigned to Dodge City, Kansas as instructors. They shared a house there with their wives. I am working on a history/documentary on my father’s service years. I would

be interested in any articles/pictures/etc. of Lt. Garton to include in this history, and of course, any memories of my father. I have a number of pictures that I could

scan and send.

Date:
7/17/2004
Time:
9:17 AM

Donald Wilson Round, Pilot, 320th BG, 444th BS. I said something about South America to my daughters and they said, “you have never been there”, I replied, “yes I have

during the war”. When my daughters were young they were not interested in what I did during the war. I always wished I had asked my father what he did at the Panama

Canal, and how he survived the 1900 hurricane and flood in Galveston, Texas. Read more…

Date:
7/15/2004
Time:
10:01 PM

Neil Dhein 394thBG, 587th Sqd 42 To 45. I was a ground crew member on a B26 and would like to clear up a point. We as ground crews did a complete preflight before the

flight crews got to the aircraft. We drained the fuel glasses to make sure there was no water in them, we walked the props through, we started the engines and ran them

up and we checked many instruments including the magnetos. Seeing this was 60 years ago I don’t remember everything we did. I have checked a lot of articles on our

planes and have seen very little credit or recognition given to the ground crews. The flight crews would have been in trouble without us. We loved our planes and were

devastated when we lost one. Of course the crews were first in our thoughts . We had 98 missions on “Gremlins Delight” when we lost her through a mid air collision.

That was a bad day. S/Sgt Neil Dhein

Date:
7/15/2004
Time:
9:00 PM

Bob Longo, Aerial Engineer, 877 PTTS, 1,000+ at Laughlin Field. Del Rio TX. From Feb. 1943 to Aug. 1945. Flew With many great Pilot Instructors! We had one belly

Landing with Capt. Conley! and a few one engine landings! The engineers were assigned one week with the field test pilot, Capt. Frank Schafer – we all loved to fly

with him! April 10 to 15, 1944 was my week with him! I was co-pilot/engineer all week, and had a lot fun testing until Fri. Apr 14 , 1944 when Carl ??? asked to take

my place that day! He tugged at my flight suit and I finally told him he could take my place, but owes me a day with Schafer when he gets his week! They took off, and

I went to take my name off the flight . There was a crash near the field! It was Capt. Schafer & Carl! We had 26 crashes, 79 casualties! 15% in training & 1/2 of 1% in

combat! I still think about that day! I found 40 years later that Schafer lived about 10 miles from were I taught for 35 years! I visited his sister-in-law (1991) and

she told me all about Frank!! A reporter found about the story and wrote it – with photos – in the local paper! I will send the article to any B26er – if interested?

Great B26 website!!! Keep it going!!! I go to the local high school and tell our WWII story’s! The students love it !!!!

Date:
7/15/2004
Time:
10:54 AM

Hello, below is a web address of what I am trying to do. One of the heroes was Roy Robertson KIA July 8 1944, I am looking for any information and photos. He was flying

“Pickled Dilly”, would you have a photo of this plane and a possible group photo with Robertson? I am also looking for a copy of the group and squadron patch (451

squadron). Let me hear from you. Frank Jasek http://www.geocities.com/bookdr2003/BU_militarycasualties.html

Date:
7/15/2004
Time:
7:05 AM

My father, Lieutenant Kenneth K. Lowery, served in the 12th Air Force, 319th Bombardment Group, mainly in Italy in 1944. When I was very young, in the early 1950s, he

would tell some of the stories but by the mid 1950s he stopped talking or would become very sad about the bombing. In 1964 he finished reading Catch 22. I read it,

asked him if it represented what happened, he said it did and never talked about the war again. He died in 1966.

I have a board that is two feet by three feet that has three holes on one of the long sides making it look like a paper with a three hole punch. On it he wood burned

the sixty-two missions with the dates, destinations, and remarks such as “scared hell out of me” or on June 6, 1944, “twice over in flak.” I wonder if the board was

used to hold papers as he served as a bombardier, navigator, and co-pilot. He also traced the crew’s movements from Barksdale, Louisiana; to West Palm Beach, Florida;

to North Africa and Italy. He burned in names of girlfriends, including my mother, and the names of planes, including the famous “Hell’s Belle II,” the first B-26 to

fly one hundred combat missions. Also listed are the names of fellow airmen who were downed in combat.

Of course, I am very curious about many things. Last year I sent away for a copy of the unit’s memory book but there were no more. So, here are a few questions :
Does the board that I described sound like anything used on a bomber?
Did crews fly in several different bombers or usually just one?
Is there a way that I can find out if my father ever flew in “Hell’s Belle II”?
Where would be a fitting place, if any, to house this board? (Or is this a fairly common item? I am not looking to give it away or sell it but would like to find out if

this is a treasure, something some air museum would want.)
What are some good books or other references to learn more about the 319th of Italy during 1944?

Thanks for any help or answers,
Lanny Lowery

Date:
7/13/2004
Time:
6:36 PM

Merrill Matthews – Marauder Man, 22nd Bomb Group, 19th Bomb Squadron, South Pacific

Date:
7/8/2004
Time:
7:22 AM

I am writing to enquire about my uncle, Mark Lee McAlpin, Captain 497th Bomb Squadron, 344th Bomb Group. (b 1920, d 1986, Stone Mountain GA). Any information about him,

pictures or anecdotes would be greatly appreciated. Regards, Michael T McAlpin

The 344th Bomb Group Reunion, Orlando, Florida, September 27th thru October 1, 2004

Date:
7/6/2004
Time:
6:49 AM

Greetings To All, especially those that spent time with and in the magnificent Martin B26 Marauder: My name is Jack Mozian. I’m late in getting here, but, here goes.

Graduated in: Multi-Engine Cadet Class 44D (Brady, TX, and Frederick, OK); then B26 Transition School in Del Rio, TX; then B26 overseas Combat Training in Shreveport,

LU; then assigned with crew to fly a model C-30 to Europe thru S. America, Africa. Crashed in S. America due to a sabotaged engine and proceeded to the Repol. Depot in

England. Assigned to the 9th AF (391st and 394th or the reverse) and flew missions mostly along the Rhine – especially the Schweinfurt RR yards. Assigned to A26 Invader

Transition School in Holland – for Asia – and later returned to the USA and discharged. Attended RPI for Aeronautical and Business Degrees and tried Glenn Martin’s

Flight Test Engineering for a short while. I ended a 36 year stint with US Airway(s) as a pilot in 1987. These days, I’m trying to remember those numbers and events in

the correct order. A few years ago the thoughtful Bill Morrison family (son, David) found me (tracked me down); which is why I was able to find myself here now, posting

to B26.COM. Keep up this good work, I intend to visit the site often. Bye now.

Date:
7/1/2004
Time:
6:29 PM

1st Lt. Raymond “Bud” Batty
391st Bomb Group
574th Squadron
1944 – 1945
Graduated as a Bombardier/Navigator from Lake Charles, La.
Stationed at Matching Green, England then Roye/Amy, France.

I am writing on behalf of my uncle as he would like to correspond and keep in touch with as many of his comrades as possible. If there are any reunions planned, I would

appreciate hearing about them. Thank you, Gayle Renne

Date:
7/1/2004
Time:
5:59 PM

I am George W. (Bill) Gleason, a former Armorer Gunner, 1943 Barksdale Field, La. I flew with a Sgt. Krause, Radio Gunner in B-26 Medium Bombers. Our original crew was

Hampton, Pilot…Armstrong, Co-Pilot…Hendrex, Bombardier Navigator…Ellsworth, Engineer Gunner…Krause, Radio Gunner…and me Armorer Gunner. I have located

everyone except Krause. I know that he finished his combat missions and returned to New York where he lived but I do not have an address on him and don’t know if he is

alive. Hampton and Armstrong have passed on. I am 81 years old and would love to locate Krause while there is still time. Can anyone help me? I would deeply appreciate

any help! Thank you! Bill Gleason

Date:
6/30/2004
Time:
9:52 PM

My father, Sgt. Kennard L. Billington flew tail gunner for 387BG 556SQ. While stationed at Clastres, France A-71, he flew B26 missions on Dec 23 and 25, ’44, during the

bulge. His pilot was 1st Lt. John A. Alexander and crew, 1st Lt. Harvey Allen, bombardier, Sgt. Michael C. Aguilar turret. On the Dec 25 flight believed to be to St

Vith, plane hit twice, flak, going in, two bomb runs and hit twice on return. Crew bailed at 2k ft, pilot jumped, chute caught on hatch, Alexander climbed back in,

trimmed the plane at 700 feet and jumped, all crew survived. The flight is believed to be 42-107606, name possibly JUNE BUG. Need confirmation, locate crew great.

Also, I have no info on his flight on Dec 23, ’44, when 387 was awarded DUC, except that his individual flight record indicates one (1) landing, flight time 3.35. Need

help, thanks again to Trevor Allen for the info on this site.

All Maraudermen deserve credit for how they performed on the Mayen Bridge Mission but the pilot, Clyde Harkins, who took over the lead and his bombardier, Warren

Butterfield, who hit the target, deserve special notes.

Date:
6/29/2004
Time:
6:02 PM

My father was William E. Vincent, AKA “Blink”. Flew a plane named “Mildred” for the 397 BG, Squadron #597 out of Rivenhall – searching for any of his crew. Steve

Vincent

Date:
6/27/2004
Time:
11:12 PM

Nice! Great site!

Date:
6/24/2004
Time:
8:13 PM

Marauderman’s Name: 1st Lieutenant Robert G. Neville
Hometown: Rock Island, Illinois
Bomb Group: 386
Bomb Squadron: 552
Years: 11/3/43 to 7/5/45
Graduation Class: 43-J
Class Location: Greenwood, Mississippi
Missions: 62
Decorations: Air Medal w/2 silver oak leaf clusters; DFC; Purple Heart; Presidential Unit Citation, ETO Campaign Ribbon w/4 battle stars (Normandy, Germany, France,

European Air Offensive)

I realize that this was way too long, but I wanted to give you as much info as possible, as it is very important to me to know about this and, if possible, hear from

somebody that knew him or from a family member of one of the crew. As I said, we have a lot of photos: planes in formation, crashes, base life in Dunmow and someplace

in northern France (Beaumont?) with very deep snow) that I would be willing to scan and e-mail to you. Sincerely, Robert P. Neville, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Dear B26.com:
First of all, let me say: Great web site! I am looking for somebody that might have been in my dad’s unit (Bomber Squadron) and might have known him (1st Lieutenant

Robert G. Neville). I know that it would make this a lot easier if I could definitively give you his BG and squadron, but I can’t. We do know that he was in the 9th AF

and was probably in either the 386th or the 391st BG. He died in 1997 and my mother (still living in Indianapolis) does not remember. She thinks it was the 386th BG. We

have his Pre-Flight “yearbook” from Maxwell Field, as well as his 43-J class book from Greenwood, MS. He took some kind of advanced training at Columbus, MS, and then

went to Barksdale Field, LA, where his original crew was assembled. We have a photo of this crew (see below) standing in front of a B-26 at Barksdale that appears to

have the number 1723 on the fuselage. That crew consisted of:

Pilot: Lt. John (Jack) Cutler (who my mother believes was a West Point man)
Co-Pilot: Lt. Robert G. Neville (my dad)
Bombardier-Navigator: Lt. Lou Hengst (later replaced by Lt. Rogers, “a swell guy from Alabama”)
Engineer-Gunner: Sgt. Earl “Mac” McConnell
Armorer-Gunner: Sgt. Max E. Baker

(Later, my father “moved to the left seat” and was the pilot. Don’t know who became co-pilot.)

In addition to the Barksdale photo, there is a similar photo in England, with this same crew standing in front of a B-26 with the name “Our Baby” on the nose. According

to another web site that I found, “Our Baby” was in the 553rd Bomber Squadron of the 386th BG. This supports the fact that he would have been in the 386th/553rd,

because some of the photos we have of him at his English base are marked on the back as being taken in Dunmow, England. I assume that this was Great Dunmow, in Essex,

which was a base for the 386th.

The thing that is confusing me is that his photo album and leather bomber jacket have an insignia that the other web site identifies as belonging to the 573rd BS of the

391st BG. The insignia appears to be some kind of a buzzard in a green flight suit, wearing a headset, holding a bomb in each hand. (I have attached a very small

electronic file of the insignia, which I pulled off the other web site.) Could he have been transferred from the 553rd to the 573rd, or vice versa? Or, did somebody

mis-identify the insignia?

1st Lieutenant Robert G. Neville is listed under 552nd BS 386th BG in the book “The Story Of The Crusaders” edited by Barnett B. “Skip” Young. “Our Baby” was a 553rd BS

ship, serial 41-31608. Bases were Great Dunmow, UK, Beaumont-sur-Oise, France (winter 1944-45) and St. Trond, Belgium.
The fellow crew members are:
Pilot: Lt. John (Jack) Cutler (who my mother believes was a West Point man) => listed under 386th BG HG as Captain John M. Cutler, 552nd BS Co-Pilot: Lt. Robert G.

Neville (my dad) Bombardier-Navigator: Lt. Lou Hengst (later replaced by Lt. Rogers, “a swell guy from Alabama”) => listed as Captain Lewis R. Hengst, 552nd BS

Engineer-Gunner: Sgt. Earl “Mac” McConnell => there is a S/Sgt. John V. McConnel in 552nd BS Armorer-Gunner: Sgt. Max E. Baker => listed as S/Sgt Max E. Baker 552nd BS

As the 386th BG shifted to Douglas A-26 Invader from January 1945 and the 391st BG in April-45, my guess is that he might have been with the 391st BG as an instructor

for a period; this could explain the 573rd BS insignia. Both 386th and 391st were in Belgium April 1945.

Date:
6/22/2004
Time:
8:02 PM

My brother, Jack E. Vandegrift was 1st Lt in the 322 BG, 452 Squadron. The pilot was Richard O. Wolf. Lost over Holland on May 17, 1943. Missing and assumed dead on

his bomber were Richard O. Wolf, John H. Burns and John L. Nash. Total number of bombers on this raid is not noted, however 6 were lost, with some crew survivors. I

would like to contact any of the former members of the 322nd BG 452 SQ who knew my brother. Short notice. I will be in Holland in 10 days. Does anyone know were or

in what town Jack may be buried? I am located in Willis, Texas. Thank you. William G. Vandegrift

William, go to 322nd. BG/ 450th, 352nd SQ mission 17th May 1943, click and then you will find the information you require. Regards, Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

I found that article. It does not indicate what field/where they flew out of and how would one find the name on the nose of his B26?

They flew from Rougham, Bury St Edmunds, England. Finding the name on the nose of the B26, that is if there ever was one will be very difficult, I do not know.

Vandegrift, Jack E., Rank 1st LT, SER NO X-XXX107, UNIT 452 Bomb SQ, 322 Bomb GP/M/, SV STATE OK, DATE OF DEATH 17 May 43, AWARDS PM. Buried: Netherlands American

Cemetery, near Maastricht, LOCATION M 17 14

Posted Sunday July 4th:

Dear Sir,
I saw this message in your guestbook. As it happened we have adopted the grave of Jack Vandegrift at Margraten War Cemetery. His brother how posted this message should

be in Holland now. Do you have any means to contact him? We live about 10 kilometers from Margraten and would be ever so happy to invite Mr. Vandegrift and his company.

We could then go and visit the grave of his brother. We thank you in advance for your support. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you would need any information

whatsoever. We will be glad to help.

With kind regards,
Marcel & Jolanda Bartels

Thank you Mr. & Mrs. Bartels! MS

Date:
6/22/2004
Time:
8:02 PM

Lester E. Barton BombGp: 322 Squadron: 451 Years: 1941-45 Class: 42 Location: Chanute Field, IL Comments: I am still looking for old friends of my deceased uncle,

1st. Lt. Lester E. Barton. He was a Pilot with B-26 Marauders. He was killed over Beauvais/Tille, France on Mar. 18, 1945 in ” The Great Squadron Tragedy.” He served

under Lt. Col. Glenn Nye. His plane was a B-26 Bomber, listed as # 43-34155 coded SS-J. He had a younger brother who was a “Gunner” that died July 20, 1943. He flew

with the B-25C’s plane no. # 42-64597, 379th Bomb Squadron, 310th Bomb Group. He was killed over Italy, Monte Carvino Airdome. They were both born in Indiana. Please

email me if you can remember anything about my two uncles! Thanks, Judy

March 18- Great squadron tragedy. While forming for a mission, the No. 6 ship in Lt. Alex Cordes’ flight collided with Cordes’ ship. The concussion knocked No. 3 ship

out of the sky. Lt. Cordes, the only man to survive in the three ships, was thrown clear of his plane and opened his chute in time to land safely. The following

officers and men were killed: Capt. George Snokelburg, Lts. Lester Barton, Victor Kasten, Ernest Moffitt, Wesley Myers, Ray Rice, John Regmund, James Shettles, and

Lawrence Watson, Sgts. Thomas Colley, Jack Callaway, Jack Fox, Thomas Lamb, James Jolley, Manuel Escamilla, Joe Pratt, Frank Wittig, and John Templeton.

Date:
6/21/2004
Time:
10:19 PM

Marauderman’s Name: Gordon J. Muise
Bomb Group: 344th
Bomb Squadron:
Years in service: 1943-46
Graduation Class:
Class Location:
Comments: My Dad, Gordon J. Muise, wasn’t actually in the 344th Bomb Group. He served in the Complement Squadron which maintained the Airbases at Stanstead, England

(August 1943 through September 1944) and Cormeilles-en-Vexin, France (September 1944 onwards.) Can anyone tell me what was the designator of the Complement Squadron?

(The designator of the Bomb Group was 344th.) Can anyone give me the exact date(s) of the transfer to the airbase at Cormeilles-en-Vexin, France? Also, is anybody

selling books about the 344th? Allan Muise

344th BG was at Stansted in England from February 9th 1944, at Cormeilles-en Vexin in France from September 30 1944, Florrenes/Juzaine in Belgium from April 5 1945, and

Schlessheim in Germany from September 15 1945.

Major non-flying units at Stansted were IX AFSC 2nd TAD (IX Air Force Service Command 2 Tactical Air Depot) and associated ADGs (Air Depot Groups), SGs (Service Groups)

and MR & RSs (Mobile Repair and Reclamation Squadrons). 2nd TAD, Stansted: 30th and 91st ADGs =>42nd, 53rd, 70th and 304th SGs=>maintained B-26’s of IX Bomber Command.

These organizations seems to have been rather complex units. A very nice 344th BG book is “344th Bomb Group (M) “Silver Streaks” – History & Remembrances World War II”

edited by Lambert D. Austin, ISBN 0-941072-20-7. A highly recommendable seller is found here: http://www.aeroplanebooks.com/unithx_pg5.htm Best regards, Alf Egil

Johannessen, Sandefjord, NORWAY

Date:
6/18/2004
Time:
9:30 PM

My Grandfather was a B-26 pilot during the war and now at the age of 23 I have an increased interest in what he did during the war, missions etc. He passed away in 1994

when I was only 10. I can remember talking about the war only one time with him but I was to naive to really pay attention at the time. I have asked my Grandmother to

find anything she has that would tell me more about him. She is still looking but did find a paper he wrote on when he joined and some small details of where he was.

This is what I know:

Marauderman’s Name: William “Bill” L. Crouch
Bomb Group: 397th
Bomb Squadron: 597th
Years in service: Joined in 42 as reserve, called to active duty Feb 43, joined above group in 5 June 44, released in July 45, went back to a reserve until called back

to active duty Oct 52- July 65, retired as a Major in July 71.
Graduation Class: ?
Class Location: He wrote that he graduated as a pilot and 2nd Lt. 3 Nov. 1942 and then assigned to combat crew training in B-26 at Lake Charles AAFB, La. He was then

transferred to Hunter AFB, Ga. in March 43 where he picked up a new B-26 and then proceeded to Europe.
Comments: I also know he joined the crew as a Co-Pilot to Lt. Braden Graw and flew 43 missions with him. He then became Command Pilot and picked up new crew with Lt.

Kenneth Terwilliger as his Co-Pilot and flew 22 more missions. That is all I have so far and I would like to know more and speak with anyone who may have served with

him. I have searched a little for web sites on the 397th Bomb Group and the 597th Squad but have found very little. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Sammy Sikes, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Park Ranger\EMT

Date:
6/14/2004
Time:
4:00 PM

Marauderman’s Name: SGT. Harold Sweet Bomb Group: 394 Bomb Squadron: 585 Years in service: ?- 8/7/1944 Graduation Class: ? Class Location: ? Comments: Just got back

from Normandy where I saw my uncles grave at the American cemetery. If anyone has more information on the 585th I would appreciate it! Thanks for adding this to your

guest book! Great site by the way!!!! William Thon

Date:
6/13/2004
Time:
8:39 PM

Marauderman’s Name: Technical Sergeant Benjamin, Costello Jr. Bomb Group: 387th Bomb Squadron: 556th Years in service: 29 Dec 1941-12 Jul 1945 (ETO 21 Jun 1943-2 Jan

1945) Graduation Class: Unknown Class Location: Unknown Comments: Benjamin Costello Jr. was my grandfather, and according to the records I have been able to obtain thus

far, served as a radio operator/gunner on a B-26 of the 556th BS, 387th BG (M). Tragically he died from wounds received in a car accident when I was very young, and I

never really got the chance to know him. I have always been curious about his service in the war, but apparently he never talked about it to the family, so I have not

been able to learn much. I would appreciate hearing from anyone who may have served with my grandfather, or anyone else with information about the missions flown by the

556th BS, 387th BG (M). I would like to extend my personal thanks to all those who served, in all of the branches through all of the conflicts in which this country has

been engaged. You are all heroes. Sincerely, Benjamin Costello IV.

Date:
6/11/2004
Time:
12:23 PM

Owen Tromburg Location: Martin Plant at Omaha Comments: I spent the last months before entering the Army Air Corps installing Equipment on B 26 aircraft. I installed

the first torpedo rack while in Omaha beneath the bomb bay and have often wondered if they were ever used. I met my wife of 61 years when they began hiring women to

replace the males that were entering the service. I never flew a B 26 but did later have the privilege of flying the Martin B-57.

Date:
6/9/2004
Time:
12:44 AM

Robert (Bob) Eugene Reed, 451 Bomb Squad, 322 BG, 43-45 Hi, my dad survived 65 missions as a co-pilot in WWII but was killed in the line of duty as a California Highway

Patrolman in 1957. I found a box of his Air Corps papers after my mother died and am trying to sort fact from legend. Family legend is he was shot down over France

around Christmas and escaped via the underground. Only one man died and my mother kept up with his family in Texas for many years. We had shrapnel in the box with his

DFC and oak leaf clusters. In the 451st year book I see him crouched on the left end of the front row in the picture labeled “Lt. Neher and crew” and there is a marker

on that page. There is a description in the book and elsewhere on this site that Lt. Neher was shot down in “Clark’s Little Pill” on Christmas Day 1944, and one man

died but not the names of the other men on board. So if anyone remembers my dad or has any information about the crash I would love to hear about it. Also, I am trying

to verify where he was stationed in England and France. It looks like he arrived in England in May, 44 and left France in April 45. There are notations about

participation in Normandy, Northern France, Germany, and Ardennes campaigns if that helps. I think it might be Great Saling in England and Beauvais-Tille in France. I

will be in Paris next week on business and would like to go to Beauvais-Tille. Does anyone know if there is a museum there? Thanks, Christie Reed

Date:
6/6/2004
Time:
9:23 PM

On this date, 60 years ago, the many bomb groups were launched to prepare the beaches for the invasion. What an awesome undertaking! Let us remember the courage,

dedication to duty and sacrifice of all those men involved in the D-Day invasion.
Wynn

Date:
6/5/2004
Time:
11:56 PM

Bob Longo, Aerial Engineer, B-26 #118232, “Stormy Weather”, (1,000 hours +) feb.1943, 45.sq. 877th. A belly landing with Capt. Conley!!! Flew with our test pilot, Capt.

Frank Schafer (Lake Huntington, New York) four days, and on the fifth day Carl (?) took my place (we all loved to fly with Schafer) they took off flew to about 3000′

and went into a dive and crashed about three (3) miles from the field! I found out (40 years) later that Schafer lived five (5) miles from were I taught school!

Date:
6/5/2004
Time:
7:46 PM

Marauderman’s Name: Lieutenant Grier Davis, Bomb Group: 386, Bomb Squadron: 552, Years in service: ? Graduation Class: ? Class Location: ? Comments: My father, Grier

Davis, was a member of the Marauders and served as co-pilot with John Armstrong. He did not discuss his experiences with us when we were children. Finally, when my son

– his 3rd grandson, needed information for a high school project, Grier began to talk. I have a wonderful tape recorded narrative about his experiences flying bombing

missions over France. He died in 1996. I’m so proud of his contributions to the war. I truly do believe that his was the greatest generation. Marilyn Davis Switzer

Date:
6/4/2004
Time:
8:14 PM

Marauderman’s Name: Elliott S. Moorhead III, Bomb Group: 322ND MEDIUM BOMB GROUP, Bomb Squadron: 452ND MEDIUM BOMB SQUADRON, Years in service: Graduation Class: Class

Location: Comments: AIR CORPS, PILOT, 9TH AIR FORCE, EUROPEAN THEATRE OF OPERATIONS. Hello, This is a picture of my father that my mother had scanned and sent in for

the www.wwiimemorial.com website. I was surfing the web and found your site. Unfortunately my father is in his last twilight of life at 83 years of age. He is bedridden

and suffers dementia. He doesn’t speak anymore as his health is declining each day. Even in his more lively years he didn’t speak of the war and his duties too often.

Although we often asked him to write his memories he never really took the initiative. We have several photos of him with his crews and aircraft. I’ll try to get the

pics scanned and send them for your discretion. I can tell you that in the first few minutes of scanning the site I recognized a name of one of dad’s close friends that

was killed in action. Roy Edge, I believe my father was the co-pilot on Roy’s fateful flight. The recant of Roy’s demise is correct as my Dad also told of the events. I

can add that the plane slid into a stand of trees and that’s what killed Roy. Dad and he were good friends from what I can remember. He mentioned him a few times during

the brief stories we could drag out of him. Lt. Roy Edge’s selfless act of heroism regarding his crew and those on the ground has made it possible for me and several

others to be here today. I recall my dad mentioning that they were returning from a mission with one engine shot up and the other running hot as they were just trying

to limp it home. I remember him telling me that the engines on the B26 ran better when they were a little on the hot side and they were counting on that as they were on

one engine and fading fast. I remember my dad saying that Roy told them all to bail out and he would be right behind them as he had to hold the plane steady until they

were all out, then he would bail too. Dad said he bailed and watched for Roy as he was in the slip stream and his parachute was opening but he never saw him come out. I

remember getting the impression he was kind of upset with Roy for not bailing as it cost him his life, but that was just my feeling as he told the story. He said the

plane slid into a stand off trees that separated the wings from the fuselage and Roy was ejected. Also, we have a picture, which is well known of the B-26 with the

right engine that just received a flak hit to the nacelle and is separated from the aircraft. My dad was piloting that bird too. Thanks, Roland

Date:
6/4/2004
Time:
5:16 PM

Dear Marauder Men. I am from Missouri and just visited your beautiful Stained Glass Memorial Windows near Duxford. My guide was David Lee, retired assistant director of

the Imperial War Museum. I am director of the Assemblies of God museum and archives (Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center, agheritage.org), Springfield, MO.) Here’s my

interest in both places.

1. The artist who designed your windows in the chapel is the same artist who designed “The Seven Days of Creation” for the Assemblies of God Headquarters, Springfield,

MO. That beautiful piece of art was completed in 1964.

2. The Assemblies of God operated two WW II planes in late 1940s to take missionaries to and from foreign countries: a C-46 and a B-17. The C-46 was destroyed in the

storm Andrew in 1992. The B-17 (formerly Ambassador II) was used for the “Mary Alice” which, as you know, is in the American Museum at Duxford. I have had an interest

in the plane for nearly 20 years, ever since we discovered the connection. I have also met Dan Knight, pilot of “Mary Alice” and only last week located Dan’s late co-

pilot’s family. This was my first visit to England and am enjoying my stay. I have just one question: Was the use of the 50-star flag in this WW II design intentional?

Best wishes for the Crusaders. Wayne Warner

Date:
6/4/2004
Time:
11:41 AM

2nd Lt. Hulbert Hugh Robertson, Comanche, Texas, Combat crew 477 B. Sq. Navigator/Bombardier. Lt. Robertson was my mother’s first husband. He died 61 years ago today

when his Marauder crashed into Carn Llidi, south Wales. His squadron had set out from North Africa bound for St. Eval, Cornwall. Only one plane had a radio, the others

were stripped for fuel efficiency. The crew consisted of Lt. Robert Lawrence (pilot, N.Y.), James Grady Jackson (Flight Officer, Ga.), 2nd Lt. Robertson, and Sgt.

William Brown (Wy.) Sgts. Pramuk and O’Connell were not on the flight. I believe Sgt. Pramuk died some years ago. Thanks to Steve Jones in Port Talbot, Wales, we have

learned a great deal more about the accident. Hulbert’s daughter, my half-sister Gwen, and I visited Steve in March, and he took us to visit the crash site and

Hulbert’s grave at the Cambridge American Cemetery. Steve has done a wonderful job of making sure these men are not forgotten. He has put us in touch with relative of

Lt. Lawrence and Sgt. Brown. If anyone knows about the other crew members, my mother would love to hear about it. Shirley Wetzel

Date:
6/3/2004
Time:
10:47 PM

Hi. My name is Olivier Cavillot. I’m living in Belgium, Florennes. My uncle began to work on this airfield (Florennes AB) in 1946. I’m searching for old pictures of

Florennes/Juzaine airfield before 1946. Could you help me? Olivier Cavillot

Date:
6/1/2004
Time:
9:23 PM

Interested in missions flown by my uncle, William D. Hargis. He was a navigator on a B26 from the 22nd Bombardment Group. Pilot of the plane was 1st Lieutenant Herbert

B. Mayes. Plane was shot down the morning of June 4, 1942 in the Battle of Midway.
James, The mission on 4th June 1942 to attack the Japanese fleet at Midway was the only mission flown by your uncle William D Hargis. The formation of four B26’s

consisted of a pair from the 69th Bomb Squadron and two from the 408th Bomb Squadron,22nd Bomb Group. All four Marauders had been dispatched to Midway Island directly

from Hawaii. Regards, Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
6/1/2004
Time:
2:13 PM
1LT Clark A. Tavener – service number XXX7331 BombGp: 391 Squadron: 575 Years: 43-44 Class: unknown Location: enlisted Bakersfield, CA or L.A., CA Comments: Would like

any/all anecdotal information about 2LT then 1LT Clark Tavener. Co-pilot on Miss Laid with CPT James Ruble for about 16 missions. And later he was pilot of Fifinella.

He was shot down at Ahrweiler. 19441223. My newborn son is his namesake and great-grandson. Would like to have story in order when it’s time to pass it on. Have a lot

of info about Ahrweiler mission but seek more personal info about Clark and the off-duty times at Matching and Roy-Maye (correct name of station for 391st in France?).

My mother-in-law, Clark’s daughter, never knew him. She was just 2 years old when he was killed.
Former crewmates from FIFINELLA ( a newly created crew)
CP CASTLE, MARK W., 2LT, XXXX500
B WILKINSON, PATRICK H., 1LT, XXXX110
FE WYNNE, JOSEPH W., TSGT, XXXX8360
RG MCGETTIGAN, JOHN F., CPL, XXXX1127
AG DICK, FRANK D., CPL, XXXX0100
Former crewmates from the ship they ferried to England (became the MISS LAID?)
P RUBLE, JAMES C., 1LT, XXXX9365
FE MILLER, FRANCIS W., SGT, XXXX7117
RG SHREVES, FORREST E., SGT, XXXX6082
Anyone that served with these men or know of their status: alive or deceased, please let me know. I would really like to speak to them or anyone else that knew Clark.
RE photo attached – on left – (1LT James C Ruble?), middle – 1LT Clark Tavener, right – (?) …this seems likely to have been taken after Tavener had left Miss Laid

crew (he is not in flight suit with rest of crew)
Thank you for any help, commentary, clarification, additional info, photos, etc.. Randy Sibley. All correspondence may be sent to me.

Date:
6/1/2004
Time:
9:01 AM

Hi…my name is JuDee Greenfield. My father was Edward Peter Koep and was in the 387 BG and 558 BS. He passed away in 1982 when I was 19 and we never really discussed

the “war” due to bad memories. But I was always proud of the fact he “gave it his all”. Please, if you have any information you can share with me about his war times,

would you share them with me? I would love to pass some info on to his grandchildren he never was able to meet….Love to all & God Bless.

Date:
5/31/2004
Time:
11:52 PM

My uncle, Raymond Batty, is visiting me and was in the 391 st Bombardment Group 574th Bomb Squadron. He was stationed in England and France under Col Gerald E Willams

from the 23 of Jan 1943 to I think 1945? I have been talking to him getting information and also looking for information about his group all day on the internet. Can

anyone help to send me in the right direction? Jim Dorman Bend Oregon.

Date:
5/31/2004
Time:
10:24 PM

Chester F. Stralka Bomb Grp 322 Squadron 452 Yrs ? Comments: I’m looking for any information on my relative. 1st Lt. USAAF, B-26 pilot, KIA on a raid over Merken,

Germany on November 28, 1944. I’m interested in raids that he took part in, along with any information on his final raid. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you. John Stralka
John, On 28th November flying B26 43-34431 coded DR-X 1 1st Lt Chester F Stralka and crew were hit by flak over the target Merken. They were last seen with wheels down

heading towards friendly territory. The B26 later crashed when Lt Stralks and T/Sgt C E Aure were killed. The remainder of the crew returned safely.
Regards, Trevor Allen, historian, b26.com

From Malcolm D. Enlow Jr.: I was not able to find a MACR for a B-26 lost on Nov. 28, 1944 So I wasn’t able to find a serial number, thus ref a name for the aircraft Lt.

Stalks was flying. But I did find some information in “The Annihilators Book II ” page 151. Here is what was found in that book: as quoted from the book:

“The Marauder piloted by 1st. Lt. C.F. Strzalka (error in spelling in book), of the 452nd squadron, received several direct flack hits after dropping its bombs at the

target. (The target was the defended village of Merken). One shell tore out the bottom of the cockpit and likely would have killed the navigator, 2nd Lt. Victor t.

Honsa, Jr. of Chicago, if he had not moved seconds before, from his standing position between the pilot, and the co-pilot, to assist the bombardier, 1st Lt. Fred B.

Wilson, Pinehurst, Idaho, in the nose of the ship.
Other flak hits knocked out the right engine, the interphone, and ripped big holes in the fuselage. The magnetic compass was the only instrument not shattered and it

enabled the pilot to head his ship toward friendly lines. The crippled bomber rapidly lost altitude and airspeed until it appeared that it might stall at any moment.
All of the crew, upon orders, bailed out at 3,500 feet, except the pilot, co-pilot, and the engneer-gunner, T/Sgt. O.E. Aune. The pilot, and co-pilot, 2nd Lt. Elliott

S. Moorhead, Jr. Washington , D.C., abandoned the ship at 1,200 feet. The B-26 dove straight down and exploded.

The pilot and the engineer-gunner were killed while the five men who survived landed smack into the middle of “no mans’s land” where a fierce artillery duel was raging.

Yet all returned unharmed to the Group.

Hope this helps John Stalka with information, Regards, Malcolm D. Enlow Jr.

Date:
5/31/2004
Time:
9:33 PM

Hi I’m Heather Wanner. I am nine years old. My grandfather Robert W Wanner was a b-26 pilot. He passed away several years ago and never talked about his experiences in

the War. I would like to know more about my grandfather’s experiences in the War. Can you help me? Thank you, Heather Wanner.
Heather, your grandfather was in the 323rd bomb group, 455th bomb squadron then transferred to the 344th bomb group. We’ll post more info as we get it.

Date:
5/31/2004
Time:
5:23 PM

US Army Flight School, 1944, Class of 44D, Lubbock Army Airfield, Lubbock, TX. Help us identify these guys – select here…
Dave, The 335th Bomb Group was an Operational Training Unit based at Barksdale Field where crews on graduation were assigned to combat units. This unit was later

redesignated as 331st AAF Base Unit still carrying out the same functions. Trevor Allen, historian, b26.com

Date:
5/31/2004
Time:
12:09 PM

My Uncle, Louis Morin, was an engineer/gunner for Free French Air Force (FFAF) during WWII. Found this picture of his crew in my folks old albums. My mother believes

this shot was taken around 1941, somewhere in Louisiana. My uncle passed away in the ’60s, I would love to be able to put a caption on this picture, maybe you can help.

Thank you, Jean L. Novel
Free French Air Force – FFAF. Units: GB I/22 “Maroc”, GB II/20 “Bretange”, GB I-19 “Gascogne”, GB II-52 “Franche-Comte”, GB II/63 “Senegal”, GB I-32 “Gourgogne”.
Merci pour nous aider indiquent l’histoire les hommes du Marauder de FFAF. Peut-être plus les hommes du Marauder de FFAF suivront votre exemple.

Date:
5/28/2004
Time:
5:49 AM
2nd Lt. Edward C. Jastremski; Bomb Grp 391; Squadron 574: Yrs 1944-1945; in Ardennes, Rhineland areas: Comments: 2nd Lt. Jastremski was Co-pilot with Pilot 2nd Lt.

Charles W. Warrington, Jr. ‘s plane 4L-A #44-67914 that was hit by flak on Jan 25, 1945, over Eurekivchen, E. Lux, Germany. Plane burst into flames during second run on

target. F/O William V. Ransom (B) and Cpl Robert P. Williams (RG) are buried in the Netherlands. Other B-26B crew were: Cpl Andrew J. Elliott, (FE), and George R. Kuto

(AG). Source is SO-3, Hdqs 391st Bomb Grp, 1-9-1945 Par 1. I am his niece- Lynlee Jastremski-Brock and would be appreciative of any info on the crew.

Date:
5/28/2004
Time:
5:49 AM

Richard D. Schlosser, 397th Bomb Group, 596th Bomb Squadron. Richard enlisted in the Army Air Corps in December 1942, and received Pilot Wings in May 1944, trained in

the B-26 Martin Marauder, flew the southern route (South America, Africa) to Europe, completed 12 bombing missions over Germany in the B-26 receiving the Air Medal with

Oak Leaf Cluster, returning to the states in 1946.

Date:
5/26/2004
Time:
6:37 AM

Gentlemen: My uncle, Alfred J. Mattacotti, served with the 22nd bomb group, 33rd bombardment squadron in Australia and New Guinea up to the Leyte Gulf landings as crew

chief. He was sent home to Chanute Field and the began to work with his brother Vincent at Milwaukee Plating Co. where he is still employed. I have grown up hearing

some of his stories about the Marauder and still thrill to hear him remember those days. He is reading “Marauder Men” now, he told me, so I hope to see it when he is

done. He may have crewed for Major Manson, and often mentioned someone named Konapacki as one of the officers. If anyone wants to contact him, I can pass a message to

him. Thanks for the wonderful site and your efforts. Alfred H. Mattacotti

Date:
5/21/2004
Time:
6:07 AM

Location: Belfast Northern Ireland Comments: On 10th April 1944, a B26 of No3 CCRC flying from Toome airfield, crashed in poor visibility on the slopes of Chimney Rock

Mountain in the Mournes. This was the units first fatal incident, all 5 crew perished. I walk frequently in the area and often come across pieces of wreckage. I would

really like to know more about the incident and if a crash report is available. Can anyone help me? David Phillips

Date:
5/19/2004
Time:
8:15 PM

Q: How do you know if there is a fighter pilot at your party?
A: He’ll tell you.

Q: What’s the difference between God and fighter pilots?
A: God doesn’t think he’s a fighter pilot.

Q: What’s the difference between a fighter pilot and a jet engine?
A: A jet engine stops whining when the plane shuts down.

Sherman Best

Date:
5/16/2004
Time:
9:23 PM

Are the French helping in the war on terrorism? Read more…

Date:
5/16/2004
Time:
6:56 AM

Luther “Danny” Minyard BombGp: ? Squadron: ? Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My grandfather “Danny” Minyard, was a B26 crew member over Europe. He died when my

mother was 2. We had boxes of pictures and newsclippings my grandmother saved and I believe they all show B26’s. I can find nothing on him anywhere. He died in ’51 or

’52 in Detroit. I am interested if any knew him or about him? Jamie Bingham

Date:
5/14/2004
Time:
11:39 AM

Comments: Hello, I am the nephew of Clay Mayberry he served in the 386th bomb group 555th squadron in the ETO. I know he was wounded badly during a mission he was a

tail gunner. He passed away a few years ago he did not talk much about his war experiences I think it caused him much sorrow. He told my mother his best friend died in

his arms on that same mission. I think it is important the sacrifices these men made for our country not be forgotten. If any one could give me more information I would

be thankful. Thank you, Mike Ellis

Date:
4/30/2004
Time:
6:29 PM

Donald N Sharp BombGp: 391 Squadron: 575 Years: ? Class: 1943 Location: ? Comments: I am trying to find information on Donald N Sharp, pilot. Who was lost with his

navigator over Bitburg Germany, on Dec 23rd 1944. Do any of the rest of his crew still survive? What were the circumstances of this loss. Was it by enemy fighters or

flak? Any information would be appreciated. F Gordon Corner

Date:
4/30/2004
Time:
4:03 PM

John D. Daly BombGp: 17 Squadron: 432 Years: Class: 7 Mar 44 Location: Santa Ana Army Air Base Comments: I am a grandson of John D. Daly, MAJ. U.S. Army, Ret. who is

deceased. I have recently come into possession of some of his medals and such. He was over Heidelburg on 23 March 1945 as a Corporal, Radio Gunner on a B-26.If anyone

has any info or stories, etc. about my Grandfather I would love to talk with you. Thank all of you for your service. Jeremy Wood

Date:
4/30/2004
Time:
3:24 PM

Vernon R. Morris BombGp: 22nd Squadron: 408th Years: 1942-1945 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Looking for anyone that new my late uncle SSGT. Vernon R. Morris from

Oklahoma. He passed away 10/30/2002 at the age of 79. He was a tail gunner and top turret gunner on B25’s and B26’s with the 5th AAF, 22nd BG, 408th BS in New Guinea,

Papua, East Indies. I believe that he was on “Firin Fanny”, “5 til Midnight”, “Drag’n Fly”, “Street Hooker” and possibly “Blonde Bomber”. There is also a photo of a B26

with a stork carrying a bomb. Some names he mentioned as crew were Adolph Brown, Lt. Hangren (bombardier), Pilot Shumway, Pilot Brian O’Neill (Squadron Commander) and

Rufus Miller. Anyone have info, please email me. Larry Weber

Date:
4/29/2004
Time:
5:59 PM

George Loder BombGp: 387th Squadron: 557th Years: ’43 – ’46 Class: 43k Location: Columbus, MS Comments: I was a B-26 pilot, didn’t get to the ETO until February ’45. I

spent 50 days in the hospital after a crash at Dodge City, Ks. Air Base in 1944 and then while ferrying a B-26 to the ETO by way of the southern route I had an engine

start cutting out. We made it to Fortalaza Brazil where we spent thirty days waiting for parts from the states that never came. We went on to the Replacement Depot at

Stone, England finally arriving there on Valentines Day 1944. When the war ended in Europe I elected to stay there, I didn’t have enough points to go home and the

Pacific did not attract me. I spent thirteen months flying C-47s with the ATC. While I didn’t see much hostile action, the B-26 will always be a very important part of

my life because it was during my hospitalization after the crash at Dodge City that I met the Air Force Nurse who is now my wife of fifty-six years.

Date:
4/29/2004
Time:
5:49 PM

Joseph W. (Bill) Hudson BombGp: 389th Squadron: 552nd Years: 43-45 Class: 1943 Location: ? Comments: RE: your answer on 4/4/04 GLORIA crash landing. THANK YOU SO MUCH,

yes I would like to have plane and crew photo. Also the names of the crew members. Only one I recall is the pilot E.C. Cleaver? If there’s any cost for this service

please let me know how you want it handled. Thanks Marion

Date:
4/29/2004
Time:
3:11 PM

J. Brice Reed BombGp: 391st Squadron: Years: 44-45 Class: May Location: LAACF Comments: For my father Lt. John Brice Reed, Command Pilot of “The Bum Steer”, stationed

in Roy, France spring 1945: I bid you all good will. God Speed! and God Bless. With Kindest regards, Kurt E. Reed

Date:
4/27/2004
Time:
10:18 PM

Hi! We thank you so very much for all the wonderful information we have received about Ray Williamson. Gosh! I wish every item in this museum had as much thorough

historical research. Thank you again. We are most appreciative. Della Klinkebiel, Linn County Historical Museum, PO Box 607, Brownsville OR 97327

Date:
4/27/2004
Time:
10:45 AM

Gilbert C. Luna BombGp: ? Squadron: ? Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My fathers names is Gilbert C. Luna. He served on a B-26 Bomber as in engineer and top

turret gunner. Had 65 missions over Europe. That’s all I know. He was from Fullerton, California. Please if you know anything about him contact me. I’m trying to fill

in the pieces Thank You. Gilbert Luna

Date:
4/26/2004
Time:
11:19 PM

Harold B Hadley BombGp: 386 Squadron: ? Years: 42-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am looking for any info on my grandfather Harold B Hadley all I have is a picture

of him next to “the Deacon” and two pictures of a plane nose down in an field with #31850 on the tail. I also have some proof sheets of “Ike’s” visit to there base and

“The Deacon” crashed into a building. Any further info would be greatly appreciated. I am compiling all info I can for my son. Thanks in advance Russell B. Hadley

Date:
4/24/2004
Time:
9:20 PM

Delwin Dale Bentley BombGp: 344th Squadron: 497th Years: ? Class: ? Location: ?

Date:
4/24/2004
Time:
3:15 PM

Lloyd B. Stanfield BombGp: 391 Squadron: 574 Years: ’44-’45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My uncle, Lloyd B. Stanfield flew B-26’s at MacDill, Myrtle Beach and in KY.

I know that he flew B26B 4L-R Serial # 4295840 with the nose name “SAM CRAM !”, which I believe was an expression of the crew chief. I am interested in knowing if there

are any of you great people who remember him and can provide me more details of his crew or pictures which depict SAM CRAM. John Stanfield, Col., USA (RET)
John, The crew which flew “Sam Cran” from the United States to England was: 1.Lt Lloyd B Stanfield pilot; 2.Lt Duane V Lucy copilot; Sgt John B Lelokas engineer/gunner;

Sgt Max E Hawkes radio/gunner; S/Sgt Bernard Brightman armourer/gunner; “Sam Cran” was lost on 28th May 1945 when it bellied into a field following flak damage.The

pilot that day was 2.Lt Leroy R Sullivan. Regards, Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
4/24/2004
Time:
1:46 PM

Wiliam V. Braden BombGp: 386 Squadron: 355 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My grandfather was in WWII. I just received his discharge papers yesterday showing

that he was in the 555th Bomb Sq. He was a Tail gunner. I’m sure this was a large group of men but I’m looking for anyone that may have known him or has information on

the group. His name was Wiliam V. Braden, from WV. He passed away in 1976. Tammy Jenkins-Carr

Date:
4/24/2004
Time:
9:08 AM

Clifton A. Collins BombGp: 319th Squadron: 440th Years: 42-44 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Seeking ANY information about my uncle 1st Lt. Clifton A. Collins SN#O-

XXX221 and his crew who were listed as KIA and lost at sea 7-20-44. Infer from available records that 2Lt. Donald W. Moyer and SSGT Wilber G. Matson were members of

same aircrew. Would greatly appreciate any assistance! Mark Collins
Mark, 25th July 1944 three B26’s of the 44oth Bomb Group were involved in a mid air collision. 1.Lt Collins flying 42-107554 crashed and crew killed. Lt Roscoe Nemer

flying 41-34892 managed to land safely and Ltr Clait H Boylann flying 42-95755 also landed safely. Trevor J Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
4/23/2004
Time:
6:53 AM

Lt. Leonard S. Lang BombGp: 322 Squadron: ? Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Hello, A salute to 2nd Lt. Leonard S. Lang Co-Pilot of 41-17982 DR-P who was shot

down 17th May 1943 Mission Target Ijmuiden 322 BG /450 & 452 SQ. He spent the rest of the war in the POW camp immortalized by the book and movie “The Great Escape.” I

met the fine gentleman this evening and he appears to be going strong. I look forward to visiting with him further to hear his story. Thank you to all of you who served

as airmen in WWII. We appreciate your service and sacrifice. Tom Farrish
Tom, On May 17th 1943 41-17982 DR-P was flown by Lt.Col. Robert W Stillman, 322nd Group CO. Leonard was copilot to Lt Vincent S Garrambone in 41-18052 DR-N which was

hit by flak at 11.52 hours and crashed into the Maas river.
Regards
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
4/22/2004
Time:
6:26 PM

Comments: Graduated from High School in 1942. Attended NYA school, studying aviation. Sept.5, 42, I stated working at Glen L. Martin at Baltimore, installing engines on

B-26’s. Worked there until March of 43 and entered the Navy. Glen L. put out a monthly magazine, showing pictures of the planes and the assembling of their aircraft. I

have four of these magazines and would consider donating them to someone under certain conditions. Sincerely, F. J. Schilling PS. Are any B-26’s still flying?

There is one Martin B-26 Marauder that still flies at the Fantasy of Flight in Florida.

Date:
4/22/2004
Time:
6:17 AM
Comments: I am living in Bourges, large town right in the middle of France, and I am proceeding to historical investigations regarding the aviation during the last war

(1942-45). During summer, June 27, 1944, the 9th U.S. American Air Forces destroyed railroad junction in this area, at ‘’Pont-Vert’’ near the little town of Marmagne,

5km W. of Bourges. With regard to my research works into the American Air Force operations there, and at the time, I am writing to you to ask you whether it would be

possible to make me copies of documents and photographs you have in hand having reference to mission covering this target. Any documents you will send me will concur

to make our MUSEUM ‘’Musée de la Résistance’’ exhibition a great success, as well as it will honour with our grateful thoughts, the United States Air Force airmen who

paid with their life for freedom of our country. Thanking you for your kind answer, Yours very truly, Frédéric Hénoff

Date:
4/20/2004
Time:
7:22 PM

William H. Bolte BombGp: 22nd Squadron: 2nd Years: July 40 to Sep 45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My father, William H. Bolte, was with the 2nd Squadron, 22nd Bomb

Group as part of the ground crew and eventually a crew chief from the summer of 1940 in NY until Sept of 44 when he returned to the states to become an instructor until

the end of the war. He’s told me allot of stories over the years, unfortunately he passed away last year. You’ve got a great website here. If your interested in the

22nd’s website it’s http://www.klimesh.com/redraiders/ “Keep em Flying” Paul Bolte

Date:
4/20/2004
Time:
4:32 PM

Floyd Mouton BombGp: ? Squadron: ? Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I just found out that my uncle was killed while flying a B26 over N. Africa. His name was

Floyd Mouton from Lafayette, LA. He was a flight engineer and I believe that he died in 1942. If anyone has any information about him and his death I would greatly

appreciate hearing from you. Thank you, Ron Moreau

Ron, Capt Floyd J Mouton 0-854XXX, 438th Bombardment Squadron 319th Bombardment Group was killed on 21st August 1944 and is buried in the Sicily/Rome cemetery location

1/7/45. The only loss on the 21st August 1944 was as follows, however I do not have the full crew loading list and it can only be an assumption that Floyd was on board.

41-35185 crashed, burned and exploded on take off for a practice mission, all on board were killed.

Regards,
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
4/20/2004
Time:
1:19 PM

BombGp: 344 Squadron: ? Years: ? Class: ? Location: Comments: Hi Guys, Can anyone supply details of a mid air collision of 2 B26 Marauders (N3A & N3S) of the 344th BG

9th Air Force, piloted by Lt.’s Williamson (344 BG, 497 BS (?)) and Hedstrom (391 BG, 575 BS (?)) returning to their airfield in France on March 28th 1945, crew lists,

mission etc. Pete Oliver

Date:
4/19/2004
Time:
7:52 PM

Comments: The 394th Bombardment Group’s 584thrd, 585th, 586th, 587th Squadrons spent 5-weeks as a B-26 Combat Crew Training School at Ardmore Army Air Field, OK July-

August 1943. They transferred from Ardmore to Kellogg Field, MI. A webpage, Ardmore Army Air Field/Ardmore Air Force Base http://www.brightok.net/~gsimmons gives the

history of that period. Unfortunately, there is very little information about the 394th while there to include. Perhaps someone who was at Ardmore or their relative has

information that could be included about this period of their proud history. Please contact Gary D. Simmons

Date:
4/19/2004
Time:
12:41 AM

Comments: Hello. My name is Matthew I thought you might be interested in a old photo I have found in my attic. Its a photo of the b26 marauders flying over Essex in

1943 its quite a big photo in a frame. Its says the b26 marauders flying over Coggeshell Essex in 1943. The Ninth US Air Force group commanded by Col. Reginald Vance

of San Antonio Texas known as the silver streaks. Thank you for time please get back to me if you can. Matthew Thomas

Date:
4/18/2004
Time:
7:32 AM

Thomas H. Galligan BombGp: 394th Squadron: 586th Years: 1942-1944 Class: 1943 Location: Arizona Comments: Dad, passed away 6 years ago. I’m trying to find anyone that

may have flown with him. He flew the “Available”. Was also in an article in the Norwich bulletin photographed in the cockpit of “Connecticut Yankee”. I have a copy of

“Torque”, the graduation yearbook for the pilots. Thanks, Bill Galligan.

Date:
4/15/2004
Time:
11:34 PM

Very interesting site. Very interesting plane. Thanks for putting it up! -BM

Date:
4/15/2004
Time:
10:42 PM

Henry Ambroskiewicz BombGp: 397th Squadron: 597th Years: 1944-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: This is on behalf of my dad who turned 79 this past February. Looking to

contact any of my dad’s old war buddies. He’d love to hear from someone. My dad repaired many a engine and patched lots of flack holes in those planes. He still talks

about friends he made that used to hang out in Cartini France. He would like to know what happened to Frank Versie (not sure of spelling) and a refueler nicknamed

“Buzby”.

Date:
4/14/2004
Time:
6:20 PM

My grandfather flew the B-26 in W.W.II and I was wondering what I would need to do to find out information about his record? His name was Franklin Diehl Messinger,

319th BG, 438th BS, from Louisiana. We used to have his old log book but we donated all of his W.W.II material to the D-day museum upon his death a few years ago. Any

information you could provide would be appreciated. Best regards, Dan Messinger

Date:
4/13/2004
Time:
2:13 PM

Nathan Ackerman BombGp: 344 Squadron: 494 Years: 44-45 Class: Location: Mac Dill Field, Fla. Comments: Would like to hear from anyone that recognizes my name.

Date:
4/12/2004
Time:
2:43 PM

Lawrence D. Glover BombGp: 394 Squadron: 586 Years: 1942-1945 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My father-in-law was Lawrence D. Glover. He was a B-26 crew chief with the

394th/586th. I am looking for tail numbers, nose names/pictures, aircraft pictures, crew names that he might have been associated with in N. Africa or in England just

prior to D-Day to after VE Day. Ed Payne

Date:
4/12/2004
Time:
1:42 PM

Grier Davis BombGp: 386 Squadron: 552 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My grandfather, Grier Davis, Jr., was co-pilot to John Armstrong, who has posted numerous

photos on this website. I was delighted when my mother let me know about the site. How wonderful it is to see my grandfather in uniform with his lifelong friends!

~Allison Weakley

Date:
4/11/2004
Time:
1:42 PM

Ben M. Martin BombGp: 391 Squadron: 574 Years: 44-46 Class: 43 Location: Shepherds Field/Del Rio Texas Comments: Looking for information/stories on my dad, Ben M.

Martin, pilot with co-pilot Walter Johnson, Jr of California. Jim W. of Ohio was navigator and George was the tailgunner. He was from Georgia. The patch on the jacket

was a bat on an H-bomb. We’re looking for information and stories. Dad passed away in 1991. ETO under Eisenhower. Any information appreciated. Mindy Martin

Date:
4/9/2004
Time:
4:12 AM

Ivor Charles Sawtell BombGp: SAAF Squadron: 30 Years: 1 Class: 1944 Location: Southern Rhodesia Comments: This is from Ivor Charles Sawtell’s son, Jeffrey James

Sawtell.

Date:
4/8/2004
Time:
7:25 PM

Forrest E. Hamilton BombGp: 397th Squadron: 596th Years: 2 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am entering my dads name, because he has now passed. I feel it would make

him glad to know that the “old bird” that he talk about is not forgotten. Some of his best memories of the war was of the men he served with. I regret that I didn’t’

pay more attention to the names of his crew. Anyway thank you for keeping the memories alive. Yours truly, Terry Hamilton (son)

Date:
4/8/2004
Time:
6:20 PM

Jack D. Loftin BombGp: 397 Squadron: 597 Years: 1944/1945 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Shot down over Germany 22 Feb 1945. Liberated by 3rd army 29 Apr 1945. All crew

members made it home.

Date:
4/5/2004
Time:
7:58 PM

Grier Davis BombGp: 386 Squadron: 552 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My father, Grier Davis, was a co-pilot with John “Jack” Armstrong. I was so glad to see

the pictures of the men in Dad’s crew. It meant a lot to me. Thank you Jack. Karen Engle

Date:
4/4/2004
Time:
8:27 PM

Lt. John W. Flory, Pilot BombGp: 386 Squadron: 555 Years: 1942-1945 Class: 43-D Location: Blackland A.F. Base, Waco, Texas

Date:
4/4/2004
Time:
7:14 PM

S/Sgt. Joseph W. Hudson Email: BombGp: 386th Squadron: 553rd Comments: Hello Marion: I saw your request on the guest page. The 386th B.G. flew Group mission number 191

on Sunday June 4, 1944. The target was the coastal guns located at Ault, France. Your brother’s plane called, “GLORIA” 131695 RG-C crash landed on return that date. See

my web page, click on photos, then click on page 7. Ault is shown during bomb strikes in the lower right corner of both photo groupings. I have a copy of your brother’s

crew photo which also shows their plane “GLORIA” I am the historian for the 386th B.G. You can contact me at b26.com, if you send me your mailing address I will send

you a copy of your brother’s crew photo.

Date:
4/3/2004
Time:
1:09 PM

Billie B. Boyd, Jr. BombGp: 386th Squadron: 554th Years: 1942-44 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I served as flight engineer-gunner on D.E. Casey’s crew. Our aircraft

was “The Bad Penny”…We flew on Gp Mission #1 on 30 July 1943. I flew my 50th/final on 12 April 44. I was flight engineer on the Berlin Airlift out of Frankfurt,

retiring 1 March 1965 as an Atlas-F missile maintenance officer, 556th SMS, Plattsburgh AFB, NY. We live in Rutledge, Tennessee…ENE of Knoxville

Date:
4/1/2004
Time:
1:09 PM

Capt. Ray Williamson BombGp: 386th Squadron: 553 Years: n/a Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My name is Gary Timms, Assistant Manager of a County Historical Museum on the

West Coast. Trying to find out any info. We had a gift at our museum. It was brought in by a lady who said she received it from a friend that had passed a way and

didn’t know what to do with it. Here goes. It was some pictures, a letter and a letter from the “War Department”. The letter was written Nov 5, 1943 and postmarked

11/6/43, from Capt Ray Williamson, his last letter home. The letter from the War Dept. states that he was shot down 11/5/43 over France. Does anyone know what happened,

the name of the aircraft, crew members or any other info. We would either like to find relatives or at least make a display with more info. Other info with this is

plane crashed near Inglevert, France and Capt. Williamson was buried at Marquise, France. The War Dept. letter was dated 7/9/46 Gary Timms
Mission #38: November 5, 1943 – Mimoyecques Rocket Site – by Chester Klier, 386th BG Historian
Saturday, April 3, 2004, 7:24 AM
Response: Incredible…Thank you very very much. Gary

Monday, April 19, 2004, 5:35 PM
Dedication page added

Date:
4/1/2004
Time:
10:28 AM

Comments: My Dad, Gordon J. Muise, served in a “Complement Squadron” attached to the 344th Bomb Group during WW II. I’m in the process of writing his WW II history.

I’ve got 32 pages written so far. Invariably, questions come up, my Dad can’t remember dates, can’t remember the “designation” of his complement squadron, etc. Can you

give me some people I can contact, preferably by email? I know there’s supposed to be a “344th Bomb Group Association.” Do you have a contact for them, and/or similar

groups?
If you could forward these information requests. Dad wasn’t part of a B-26 crew, he belonged to the “complement squadron” that maintained the bases for the 344th Bomb

Group, first at “Bishops’ Stortford” in England, and later at “Pontoise” (a.k.a Cormeilles en Vixen) in France. My Dad was a Chemical Warfare Specialist. As it became

apparent that neither side was going to use CW, my Dad became the Catholic Chaplain’s assistant, and later transferred to Headquarters, Ninth Air Force, where he worked

as a “Geodetic Computer.” I will add a dedication page. I live outside Paris, and can send some photos of Pontoise, the Aerodrome, and Cormeilles en Vixen.

My requests for information are:
1. What was the “designator” of my Dad’s complement squadron? (The designator of the Bomb Group is “344th”.)
2. On what date(s) did the 344th arrive at Pontoise? My Dad was part of a ten-man “rear guard” that stayed behind at Bishops’ Stortford, and he arrived at Pontoise

about a week after everybody else. My Dad has been saying that he arrived in Pontoise in August 1944, but I’ve visited Pontoise Aerodrome. Signs there indicate that the

344th arrived in Pontoise on September 30, 1944.
3. I’ve written a 32-page history of my Dad’s war stories. I tried to get “World War II” magazine to publish it, but they never responded to any of my enquiries. I’ve

never “published” anything before. Do you have any advice for someone trying to get his Dad’s war stories published? In any case, thanks for answering my email so

promptly, Allan Muise

Date:
3/31/2004
Time:
5:16 PM

Joseph W. Hudson BombGp: 386 Squadron: 552 Years: 6/43-8/45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My brother Joseph W. Hudson (Bill), staff sergeant, flew with the 386th from

around Aug/Sept 44 till sometime in 45 when he was transferred to the 428 Bomb Sqd. 310 bomb Gp. He flew tail gunner on the GLORIA piloted by Lt. E.C. Cleaver (Ernie).

I’m interested in info on his planes, crew, missions, etc. I believe they crash-landed GLORIA around June 44 in England returning from a mission. I think there were two

Gloria’s (Ernie’s wife’s name). Any information you have would be great. Thanks Marion (Jiggs) Hudson

Date:
3/29/2004
Time:
10:36 PM

Comments: I am the great niece of Everett Chrisco. The eldest granddaughter of his surviving brother. I happened to type his name in a search engine and this popped up!

Both a shock and a pleasure to find my uncle’s picture. I’m so happy to see that my uncle’s life is known. Thank you! Thank you! Cami-Sue (Chrisco) Webb

Date:
3/29/2004
Time:
2:47 PM

Comments: I have a picture on my web site of a B-26B4-MA, Serial No. 41-17995 (DR+T) which served with the 322nd BG, 452nd BS. The aircraft was first named “TONDELAYO”

and was later named “MR. PERIOD TWICE”. By the time the picture was taken (summer ’44), the B-26 was relegated to being an instructional airframe at the 307th Station

Hospital Rehab Center somewhere in England.

My father, Winthrop A. Jackson, Jr., was a B-17 Co-Pilot (and Pilot) with the 384th BG, 544th Sqdrn from November, 1943 to May, 1944. On his 2nd mission he ditched in

the channel (December 30th, 1943). On his 23rd (May 8th, 1944), he was seriously wounded and #4 was knocked out. He never flew combat again. He spent 9 months

convalescing in England and then returned to the USA . While in England, he was sent to a rehab center at the 307th Station hospital (wherever that was – I’d like to

find out someday). Anyways, he snapped the picture of the B-26 that I sent you a link for. If you would like to see some of his other wartime photos, check out the web

site (link down). Win Jackson
DR+T, Serial No. 41-17995 was a B-26B4-MA built at Martin’s Maryland factory and was delivered to the U.S. Army Air Force on January 7th, 1943. When it was assigned to

the 322nd BG, 452nd BS, it was given the name TONDELAYO. The 322nd BG was originally assigned to the 8th Air Force in England. The 452nd Squadron (of the 322nd BG)

arrived in England with its B-26s in April, 1943. After a period of working up, the 322nd BG flew its first mission on May 14th, 1943. Twelve aircraft were sent to bomb

power plants at Ijmuiden in Holland. All returned safely, however, the damage on the target was slight. Therefore, on May 17th the 322nd BG flew a follow-up raid (11

planes), and lost 10. DR+T participated in the first raid (May 14th) but not in the second one (May 17th). It was later renamed MR. PERIOD TWICE because it missed this

disastrous follow-up raid. Source: Alf Egil Johannessen

Date:
3/28/2004
Time:
6: 29 PM

Earl K. King BombGp: 320 Squadron: 444 Years: 1942-1945 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am entering information about my father, Earl K. King, born in North Carolina.

He served as an Aerial Photographer Gunner 939 with the 444th Bombardment Squadron, 320th Bombardment Group. He participated in the Battles & Campaigns in Sicily, Rome,

Arno and Southern France. Holder of EAME Campaign Medal w/3 Bronze Service Stars, Air Medal with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters, Distinguished Unit Badge with 1 Oak Leaf Cluster,

the Croix de Guerre with Palm, Purple Heart Medal and WWII Victory Medal. Wounded in Action 23 August 1944. Personal – My father died of cancer in 1968. He often spoke

of his military days and mentioned being stationed in North Africa and making bombing runs to Italy. He was shot down, wounded while parachuting and taken prisoner

briefly before escaping from his captors with another American, David S. or F. Huston or (Houston). Both of these men were assisted back to England through the efforts

of the French Underground, whose bravery and sacrifice my father spoke of in reverence. Also, he mentioned that the planes in which he flew were known as ‘flying

coffins’ I believe because their wingspan was short when compared to their overall length/size.

Date:
3/28/2004
Time:
2:32 PM

Comments: My father, Sterling Hoch, was a pilot with the 596th from about July 1943 until returning from Europe in February 1945. I am currently doing research on his

service years, and would appreciate any memories, pictures, data from his days with the squadron. He passed away 1/31/1999, but my mother, who he married shortly before

heading overseas, is still living.

Date:
3/28/2004
Time:
6:44 AM

Comments: Gentlemen, As a young boy 12 years of age, I was at the receiving end of one of your bomber raids towards the end of the war. I was never sure if the planes

were B-26’s since it took very little time for me, after I saw the bombs come out and I hit the sidewalk. At that time I lived in the little town of Goor in the

province of Overijsel in the Netherlands. I am glad you helped shorten the war and I was able to get back to my Parents who lived in an other part of the Netherlands.

Thank You. Ron Klerk de Reus

Date:
3/27/2004
Time:
4:15 PM

Davis B. Leonard BombGp: 323 Squadron: 453 Years: 1944-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Served as togglier and flight lead navigator from August 1944 to April 1945.

Completed 65 missions flying with numerous crews of the 453rd squadron. Would love to hear from someone I served with who might remember me.

Date:
3/26/2004
Time:
2:32 PM

Gordon Brownlee BombGp: 397 Squadron: 596 Years: 2 Class: 43H Location: Frederick, OK Comments: I joined the Group after flying a replacement aircraft and crew overseas

in early 1944. After surrendering the aircraft after landing at Land’s End. I was sent to Ireland for Escape and Evasion Training and was finally sent to Rivenhall to

join the Group. Other crews paralleling my journey were Grant Braden and Martinez. Have temporarily forgotten his first name but he was always called “Marty”. Remained

with the Squadron and Group after the war and became Squadron Commander. Returned home after the Japanese surrendered and we didn’t have to fly over there. Married the

girl that I was engaged to after I returned home and have been happily married now for 58 years. If anyone reads this and would like to correspond with me. Have a

great Summer and the best to you and yours. Gordon Brownlee

Date:
3/26/2004
Time:
10:30 AM

Comments: I am currently the commander of the 586th Flight Test Squadron at Holloman AFB, NM. The Air University has helped me trace our lineage back to the 586th Bomb

Squadron of the 394th Bomb Group. We would like to gather information, photos and memorabilia to help establish a display of our squadron’s heritage, and possibly host

a “get together” with some of the former members. Can you or your organization assist us in doing this? Thank you in advance for your time and efforts. Sincerely, Ryan

Smith, Lt Col RJ “Cowboy” Smith, Commander, 586th Flight Test Squadron

Date:
3/24/2004
Time:
10:10 PM

Comments: Mike: I just wanted to thank you for taking the time to visit Akron. Because of your visit I now know where I will send all my Dad’s records. From your

description I can tell you were very comfortable with the University of Akron. I still try to make a visit to your site everyday or so. Malcolm D. Enlow Jr. Malcolm

Enlow, Sr.

Date:
3/23/2004
Time:
11:23 PM

Comments: Sorry I can’t claim any direct connection with the fabulous aircraft, the B-26. She was the one that was referred to fondly as having no visible means of

support do to small thin wings. Your site is great! I have thoroughly enjoyed the visit. Patrick Tillery www.KilroyWasHere.org

Date:
3/23/2004
Time:
5:38 PM

Comments: As a local resident and frequent visitor to Earls Colne Airfield, and memorial, I give thanks to all you brave fliers and a prayer to those who did not

return. Kim W.
Thank you, Kim! MS

Date:
3/23/2004
Time:
6: 39 AM

The 456th bomb squadron has announced a “Last Hurrah” at the end of May in Mississippi. So far, there has been great interest from about 12 members of the squadron.

Members of the 456th and their families are invited – let’s go! Check airfare to Gulfport, MS (airport code GPT).

Date:
3/22/2004
Time:
11:23 PM

Comments: I am an analyst at the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (formerly CILHI), who is writing you with the hope and objective of obtaining information concerning

a possible B-26 crash site in Papua New Guinea (PNG). I have a report that a B-26 crash site was recently found near Buna, PNG. On the aircraft is the number “96”. It

is my understanding that this is the ship’s squadron number, rather than a part of the tail/serial number. Unfortunately, the records I have of the B-26s lost in PNG do

not include the ship number. Any assistance you can provide me concerning a B-26, ship number 96, that was lost in PNG during WWII will be most appreciated. Thanks. I

hope to hear from you soon. A.L.

Date: 8/7/42 B26 serial number40-1496 named “Dixie” 19th.Bomb Squadron, 22nd.Bomb Group. Pilot Lt Robert Hatch. Ran into rain storm clouds, became lost and gas running

low the pilot elected to bellyland in a swamp near Wu Wu, New Guinea. All crew escaped safely and returned to unit 22nd Bomb Group. The B26 was burned. Regards, Trevor

Allen, historian, B26.COM.

Date:
3/21/2004
Time:
5:10 PM

Jack Jarman or John Jarman BombGp: 320 Squadron: 444th Years: 07/15/1944 Class: 1944 Location: Victorville California Comments: My Dad flew in the 320th Bomber Group

as a “Dr” Navigator, Bombardier, and Lead Bombardier in the war. He was stationed in Florida at Tampa Bay, flew to Natal Brazil, then to the Ascension Islands, and

landed in Africa. He says as he came up on the continent it looked like a steam room, he followed a river at about 250 feet altitude, Jim Logsdon was his Pilot. He

dropped his wheels, and my Dad hollered now, and they landed with no gas in their plane. They could not taxi off the runway and upset the man in the tower. My dad saw a

friend from the 1939 fair at Yerba Buena Island. He said they followed the African coast up to Dakar Africa, he and 4 other planes were stretched out about a 1/8 mile.

They hit a tremendous storm with very intense lighting. As we flew up the coast, the pilot would have their wheels up to climb, they would drop or gain a 1000 feet per

minute. This story tells of his arrival to the war. My dad is on the phone as I dictate this, and I need to get off the phone with him. If you know of anyone that was

in his group, or remember my Father, or were involved in anyway with the 320th Bombers Group.

Date:
3/21/2004
Time:
11:46 AM

Joe Lazar BombGp: 323 Squadron: 456 Years: 3 Class: Feb 44 Location: San Angelo, TX Comments: Anyone who knows me please write. I was the last Squadron Navigator,

scheduled on May 1, ’45, for the last mission that was not flown. General Moench was scheduled as a copilot observer in the 9th plane of the Box. I flew 7 missions with

Lou Rehr as a Gee Navigator. Notably the First Crailsheim Mission during which we were hit by several ME 262’s.

Date:
3/21/2004
Time:
10:35 AM

Comments: My late uncle Richard Schlosser, 397/596, was part of a flight crew of B26 Martin Marauders. Here is a quote from his obituary, which is the most information

I have, right now.

“Richard enlisted in the Army Air Corps in December 1942, and received Pilot Wings in May 1944, trained in the B-26 Martin Marauder, flew the southern route (South

America, Africa) to Europe, completed 12 bombing missions over Germany in the B-26 receiving the Air Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, returning to the states in 1946.”

Before he died my cousin had him record his memories. There are something like 6 to 8 tapes, in all. Would you be interested in receiving this information? Thank you

for your time. Jan McDaniel

Date:
3/20/2004
Time:
3:59 PM

Comments: Last night I had the pleasure of honoring, among others, a member of my Mason Lodge who is a former bombardier with the 391st Bomb Group, 572 Bomb Squadron.

During my research for my commentary about this man I learned that he was presented the Soldier’s Medal for bravery during one of his 81 missions during WWII. His name

is Henry S. Herr. During one of his missions in a B-26 with the nose art of “The Dream Queen” a bomb hung up and was stuck in a dangerous position in the open bomb bay.

Naturally they couldn’t land like this. The bomb bay wasn’t large enough for a man to enter while wearing a parachute. Therefore, two other crew members hung Mr. Herr

upside-down by his ankles out of the bomb bay while he made the necessary adjustment to release the remaining bombs one by one.

All this going on while his brother was storming Omaha Beach on June 6th, 1944. A mission where his brother was lost.

On another mission, while flying a low altitude the plane received small arms fire from the ground. Mr. Herr was hit in the knee and was subsequently grounded from

further flights. This was a blow to him by itself, but he kept up his military honor with other duties.

Now he’s 82 years old and is still active physically as well as mentally, and has the respect of all who know him. He has given his life to help others in need. He’s

very active with the Masons, including the Scottish Rite helping people with language disorders, the Morocco Shrine assisting children with severe burns and crippling

diseases, and many other aspects of the fraternity. In 1983 he became director of a Meals-on-Wheels program to assist the elderly. He rings the bell every Christmas for

the Salvation Army to collect money for the needy. All of which he remains loyal to today.

For these reasons, and many more not listed, I would like to do all I can to honor this man for his patriotism to our country, and his compassion for his fellow man.

For more information, I suggest and request you contact him for more detailed information about his duties and experiences while serving on a B-26. If I can be of any

further assistance please feel free to contact me.

Regards,
Samuel H. Bennett, Worshipful Master
Solomon Lodge

Date:
3/20/2004
Time:
3:59 PM

Louie Franklin Turner Years: 1943/46 Comments: Greetings from a Field Artilleryman! This is response to the DUCK question I just spotted. The so-called RUPTURED DUCK

was not a medal, but rather a gold-toned metal lapel pin, worn by the new civilian as a token of his honorable discharge following hostilities in WWII. I simply can’t

understand someone from the Pentagon not knowing that.
I served in MTO/Italy, as a Chief-of-Section, Battery B, 985th Field Artillery Battalion, II Corps, Fifth Army. Our gun was a tractor drawn 155mm howitzer (LONG TOM).

My tour overseas extended from 25/27 Jan 1945 to 19 Feb 1946. I was in the North Apennines and Po River Valley campaigns.

Thank you, Mr. Turner. You are the Best! MS

Date:
3/20/2004
Time:
9:59 AM

Donald M. Wolberg BombGp: ? Squadron: ? Years: 1944-1945 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I’m hoping you can help me find some more information about my stepfather who

was a bombardier / navigator aboard B26s during WW2. Unfortunately, he passed away a few years ago and I’m only sure the following: Name: Donald M. Wolberg, 2nd Lt

Plane marking on nose: “I T4” or “1 T4”. He was shot down over Germany late April 1945, crashed landed and was hurt, taken prisoner by the Germans but turned over to

the allies a couple of days later in some sort of exchange. Thanks, Phil Siegel

Date:
3/20/2004
Time:
9:59 AM

David Sabelsky BombGp: ? Squadron: ? Years: 1942-1945 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My dad was a turret gunner on a B-26 named St. Peter’s Express out of New

Tumbridge Wales, England. I’m trying to find the nose art for that plane to recreate it in a jacket for him. If any of his crew members are around, please contact us.

Thanks, Howard

Date:
3/18/2004
Time:
1:31 AM

David George Crole-Rees BombGp: Squadron: 24 Years: Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Bonjour, I am trying to get information on the 24 Squadron that was based in Italy,

and more particularly on my father, David George Crole-Rees, 2nd pilot on Marauder, based in Italy between August 1944 and May 1945. He got his flying badge in April

1944 in Pietersburg. The names of the skipper he was with were: Capt Jennings; Lt Attwell; Lt Kemp; Lt/Col Bosch; Capt Sheppard; Lt Lubner; Lt Talbot; Major Woods. Is

the third person from the right on the first picture posted by George Croote my father, David George Crole-Rees, 2nd pilot based in Italy? Does anybody have any more

information? Thanks in advance. Best Swiss wishes, Anna Crole-Rees

Date:
3/17/2004
Time:
8:50 PM

Charles Gese BombGp: 386 Squadron: 555 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am the daughter of Lt. Charles “Bud” J. Gese. I requested information on my father a

couple of years ago, but have not visited this site since then. I am amazed at the progress!! Hats off to all the wonderful people who have put this site together! If

anyone has any information about my father, please feel free to contact me. I have a picture of his plane and crew that I would like to have scanned and I can

contribute, how can I do this?? Thank you. Cassandra J. (Gese)Freiberger

Date:
3/17/2004
Time:
6:50 AM

Edward Nielsen BombGp: 387th Squadron: 558th Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am still working on getting information about my Grandfather’s (Edward Nielsen)

military service. Also still trying to get a definitive answer with regards to the “duck” he has with his medals. I do have a little bit of good news to report for a

change. I had lunch with a business associate and discovered that he is a West Point Graduate, so I told him my plight and he offered his assistance. He mentioned that

he graduated from West Point with a couple of officers who are stationed at the Pentagon and said he would reach out to them.

His first order of business was to determine what the “duck” medal was. The preliminary response he got back was as follows:
“This is the answer I have been given from quite a few people that I have asked here at AOG. I am trying to get in touch with a man who does nothing but medals. Having

no luck with his email. I will keep trying and let you know what he tells me. But, I think it will be the same thing. This answer is from the USMA Historian:”

“I don’t know, either. My best guess is, since the recipient was in the AAF is that it is one of the “joke” awards given to fliers who were shot down and had to walk

out or in this case had to be rescued at sea perhaps. The pin and patch for those who walked out was a boot with wings. If I can be of further assistance just drop me

an email.”

He said he is trying to contact someone who can access his military records. I told him the primary reason for doing this was to straighten out which medals my

grandfather is due and to replace the one’s stolen such as his purple heart (which mysteriously the military has no record of). Another reason is to find out what

planes (names and or serial numbers) my grandfather flew on so there is a possibility to contact some crew mates to see if they have stories and or pictures. Well,

this is where I stand, if you can help in any way let me know.

One more question: I am trying to research the reason for discharge: “Honorably Discharged By Reason Of: CDD SEC II AR 615-360 & 3rd IND HQ AAFEFTC, M/F, Ala. dtd, 28

Sept. 1943.” Any ideas? Thanks, Michael J. Gilberg, Jr.

Date:
3/17/2004
Time:
7:03 AM

Quinn G. Smith BombGp: 344 Squadron: 496 Years: 1945 Class: 44-13 Location: Childress AAF, Texas Comments: Commissioned at age 19. Flew 14 missions as bombardier and

navigator from France and Belgium. Transferred to Schleissheim, Germany, in Sep 1945. Transferred to 17th Counter Intelligence Detachment (AAF) in May 1946. Transferred

to US Army in March 1947. Retired from US Army as Colonel in July 1970.

Date:
3/16/2004
Time:
12:10 PM

BombGp: 22nd ARW Squadron: 384th ARS Comments: I am a member of the 384th ARS, the modern day 584th BS from WWII (394th BG). I am charged with decorating our new

Squadron building with items from our squadron’s past. I am looking for information (Historical Documents, pictures, patches, artifacts) on the 584th BS that we could

display in our squadron building here at McConnell AFB, KS. Please send me an email if you would like to discuss or donate to the Squadron. This is official. I am

looking for 584th BS patch to display the 584/384th patch lineage in our Squadron building at McConnell AFB, KS. My squadron commander, Col Bush, wants us to preserve

the squadron’s history as much as we can and bring in our history from when we were once a Bomb Squadron. He will send a letter recognizing the contribution. Thanks,

Captain Joe Rucker, USAF

Date:
3/15/2004
Time:
6:59 PM

Comments: When I grew up during late 1940’s and 1950’s there were many vets about who liked to tell a tale of their experiences in the war. One such story related the

difference between the Martin B 26 and Douglas A 26…if you flew them through a rainstorm in the Martin you stayed dry and in the Douglas you got soaked they leaked at

every joint…allegedly because Martin was a prewar design and better finished where the Douglas was a war time design and fit and finish were ignored. Don’t know the

truth of this. I do know the vets never told any but funny and interesting stories about their experiences in the war…when I grew up I began to realize how selective

their story telling was. Louis Doering

Date:
3/15/2004
Time:
5:54 PM

Vernon M. Morris Comments: Glenn L. Martin – Began as a mechanics helper in B26 Nose section June 25, 1941. Promoted to Engineer and in 1944 was “Invited by US

Government” January 1944. Numerous actions I was a part of and contributed to, some amusing, others helping to get 6 and 8 planes a day from scratch to fly away.

Date:
3/15/2004
Time:
3:37 PM

James Jimenez BombGp: 387 Squadron: 558 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Dear Sir, I am looking for information on my Grandfather, I have been told he served

with the 558th BS as a pilot. I do not know the dates. I am building a memorial to him for the purpose of donating it to the Air Museum where I volunteer and have thus

far come up lacking. I know there are articles of his within the family but after he died in 1979 it all started to become lost. His name was James Jimenez. Any

information that you may be able to provide would be greatly appreciated in my research. Jerry Peterson

Date:
3/14/2004
Time:
10:44 PM

Sherman Beaty BombGp: 386 Squadron: 555 Years: 43-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My Grandfather was Sherman Beaty. He flew Martins in Europe during WWII and was MIA

in Korea flying the Douglas B26. His son (my father) served in the U.S. Army from 1967 to 1971, and 1974 to 1990. I served in the Marine Corps from 1993 to 1997. James

T. Beaty

Date:
3/13/2004
Time:
1:57 PM

Hugh H. Walker, Col USAF (Ret) BombGp: 391st Squadron: 572nd Years: 1942-1944 Class: 43A Location: Ellington, Houston, TX 1943 Comments: I spent 33 1-2 years on and

off in the Air Force. Flew 54 missions in B-26 Marauder out of England. Flew the atomic bomber B-45 out of Sculthorpe, East Amglia in 1952-1955. Flew the C-97 out of

California during the Viet Nam war. Total flying hours 7,500 in many types of planes, including the last one in 1975 in the C-130. Retired in 1975 at age 60. 88 years

old as I write this.

Date:
3/10/2004
Time:
5:27 PM

Henry Herman (H.H.) Ahrens BombGp: 323 Squadron: 456 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am looking for any information I can find about my father-in-law. His

name was Henry Herman (H.H.) Ahrens. To his family and friends, he was known as Bob. Unfortunately, he passed away in 1983 and his rather large family has scattered his

memorabilia across the US. None of his children really know what unit he was in, when he flew, etc, only that he was a co-pilot, was an instructor in Waco, TX(?) or

Kansas and they think he flew in mid to late 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge. I married his youngest daughter and his grandsons are now interested in their

grandfather. Can you research with just his name? Also, what kind of information can you provide about him and what will your research will cost? I would also be

interested in any of his fellow crewmembers who may still be with us. I’m in the process of gathering all of his surviving pictures and would be happy to share them

with you. Thanks for your help, Gregg Griffin

Gregg, 2nd Lt.-1st Lt. Henry H. Ahrens Jr. is listed in John Moench’s book “Marauder Men” on page 421; 323rd BG 456th BS. Alf Egil Johannessen

Date:
3/10/2004
Time:
5:27 PM

Comments: My father flew 51 missions with Harvey Jacobs. Jake recently passed away and I have a copy of some interesting information he wrote. My fathers name was John

K (Jack) McNamara. I also have a mission diary, depicting crew, load, target, etc. Tell Chris Pritchert (earlier message) his father was with my father at least on some

missions.

Date:
3/10/2004
Time:
3:48 PM

Albert R Lombardo BombGp: 452 Squadron: 729 Years: 4years 8mo. Class: 1941 Location: Norden Bombsight Lowery Field. Comments: T/Sgt. Maintenance bombsights and

autopilot flight checking of B-17s through the Normandy Invasion. Discharged Oct. 15-1945. Long time ago. Albert.

Date:
3/10/2004
Time:
2:37 PM

Frank Palmer BombGp: 344 Squadron: 496 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Hello, I am trying to find out the history of my grandfathers service. I am told he was a

tailgunner, but not sure if that is true. I have a photo he took of his buddies in front of B-26. Any information you can tell me of this plane is greatly appreciated.

Thank you so much. Mark Palmer

Date:
3/9/2004
Time:
11:50 PM

BombGp: 73 Squadron: 28 com Years: 1943 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: first B-26 to attack Japanese fleet off Dutch harbor, pilot was Thornbrough, my uncle was Howard

Jaycox, radio operator. Colliers magazine did a article about the crew in the early 50’s. Howard Jaycox
Howard, it would be great to add the article to the site, send copies. MS

Date:
3/9/2004
Time:
7:30 PM

Comments: I am the commander for the 386th Air Expeditionary Wing assigned and serving in Southwest Asia in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. I was interested in

learning the history of the 386th and discovered your website. It has been a very helpful and enjoyable read. Today the 386 AEW proudly wears the Crusader crest and is

a Tactical Airlift Wing comprised of two C-130 Airlift Squadrons with aircraft, men and women representing 9 different Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve

stateside units. Col. MARK R. KRAUS

OutStanding! Thank you! MS

Date:
3/7/2004
Time:
8:41 PM

George Benson BombGp: Squadron: Years: ’45-46 Class: Location: Comments: I don’t remember the number of the Utility Ordnance Squadron I was with at the Breezy Point NAS

at Norfolk, and the war was mostly over. The demand for towing had slowed considerably. In the Spring of 1946, our group was merged with the Air Station at Chincoteague

Island in Va. and we were all moved to the boonies and camped out with the zillions of swamp mosquitoes at night, and an equal hoard of horseflies by day. I was an S2c

USNR at the time. I read your post about towing targets from a JM-1 with interest. I was stationed at the Breezy Point Naval Air Station in Norfolk, VA from Aug. ’45 at

the utility squadron there. We had several JM1s and later model JM2s for towing targets, but most of our towing was done from TBMS. Anyhow I noticed that your memory is

a little foggy about the targets, the towing line, and it’s length, etc. We used PBY5As, JM ones and twos, TBMs and very late in 1945 we had 2 Douglas A-26s; as you

well know, that a number of years later, the “widowmaker” B-26(JM-1) was phased out and was replaced by a far superior Bomber, the Douglas A-26, which was interestingly

enough renamed the B-26! It was produced too late to see much action in the war. On any of the planes, the standard towing length was 5,000 ft. The “wire” as you call

it, was 3/16 inch stranded steel cable. We had to learn how to splice them, and very neatly, too. The targets were not silk, but nylon, approximately 18 inches in

diameter, and about 30 feet long when deployed. For night hops and battery practice for the ships in the Atlantic, we used mostly PBY5As, but flew in TBMs and JMs in

the daytime. The night hops required a lantern at the end of the target. The TBMs had reels with which the cable was reeled in using a wind impeller on the Port side of

the aircraft. When the target was deployed, it was necessary to disengage the clutch to the wind impeller, which was kept from turning by a steel rod. On several

occasions a careless seaman would release the brake to let the cable reel out without bothering to release the clutch, and the steel rod sheared off the blades off the

impeller. Since there was no means of reeling the cable back in, after the target had been cut by the frog, the cable (an entire mile of it) was cut and dropped in the

ocean. The hydraulically operated reels on the JMs solved that problem. Yes, I did see one Bearecat take off, and it was an amazing sight to see. It had the same engine

as the Corsair, and the Hellcat, (the P&W R-2800) but on a much, much smaller, lighter body. I was all engine!

Date:
3/7/2004
Time:
5:21 PM

BombGp: 323rd Squadron: 456th Comments: Hi, I have a question for any members of the 323rd BG. My dad was in the 456th. The Question is…After you were transferred to

the 344th did you still consider yourself members of your previous squadron? If you started in the 456th Squadron did you change your mindset and say “Now I’m in the

497th 479th Squadron? I ask this question because I have seen Christmas cards from Dec 1944 that say from the 456th, they should say from the 497th…Thanks for any

help. Christopher Pritchard
Christoper, 456th BS: Constituted 19 Jun 1942. Activated on 4 Aug 1942. Inactivated on 26 Nov 1945.
323rd BG: Constituted 19 Jun 1942. Activated on 4 Aug 1942. Inactivated on 12 Dec 1945.

Date:
3/7/2004
Time:
4:37 PM

Leo K. Simpson BombGp: 320 Squadron: 444 Years: 1941-1945 Class: 1942 Location: Chanute Field Comments: Compact me for any information about the 444th Squadron of the

320th Bomb Group. I was a crew chief for the plane “Fuber” #85 and “Patsy” #79. I served in North Africa, Sardinia, Corsica, France and Germany.

Date:
3/6/2004
Time:
7:08 PM

Comments: In response to Chris Sakowski’s request for pictures of “The City of Sherman”, My dad flew that ship on five of his missions as co-pilot and then pilot. There

is a picture of it on this site if you follow the “Ted Harwood” link. I have that picture and one more which both show the nose art. Regards, Ted Harwood II

Date:
3/6/2004
Time:
6:45 PM

Edward O. Poynter (not Pointer) BombGp: 386 Squadron: 555 Years: 1943-44 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I was an armorer/gunner. Flew most of my 75 missions with Ralph

D. Wilson, who was the best pilot I knew. Would like to hear from members of that crew. I flew most missions as tail gunner, but also flew in other positions.

Searching for fellow squadron members that remember S/Sgt. Poynter and his receiving the DFC.

Date:
3/4/2004
Time:
6:02 PM

Fred Goldberg BombGp: 397 Squadron: 596 Years: 3yrs 2 mos Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I was a corporal in Operations under Sgt. Jimmy Newhardt & Maj. Weltzin

Date:
3/3/2004
Time:
9:03 PM

Charles M. Herbst BombGp: 320 Squadron: 442 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My dad, Lt. Charles M. Herbst, was a bombardier stationed in Dijon, France during

the war. I was wondering if anyone remembered him? Thanks, Ray Herbst

Date:
3/3/2004
Time:
2:18 PM

Walter (Jack) Yahrmarkt BombGp: 391 Squadron: 572 Years: 1943 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I’m looking for info on my uncle Jack Yahrmarkt who died off the Florida

coast, May 21st, 1943. He was a bomb/nav. Family story is after he visited the tail gunner and went back to his station the plane exploded (crashed?) and all hands were

lost, except the tail gunner, who landed safely. I would like to gather more information about this accident. My grandmother received his GI life insurance for many

years. YAHRMARKT, WALTER J., 2LT, XXX3247 SOURCE: SO-7 HQS, 391st Bombardment Gp 2/7/1943 Par. 4 Duty: Feb 1943-May 1943. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, David J. Page USASA, Jun 67 – Jun 71

David, The B26 flown by Lt Martin J Pavletich crashlanded short of Lakeland Field May 21st 1943. Six of the crew were killed and 1 survived the crash. Regards, Trevor

Allen, Historian, B26.COM

Date:
3/2/2004
Time:
4:58 PM

Comments: On the page listing units using the B-26…why are the 69th and 70th BS’s said to be previously with the 42nd BG? They were originally with the 38th BG in the

States, THEN they were detached from AAF until the 13th AF and the 42nd BG were formed in Jan.43 at which time these two units became units permanent to the 42nd. By

summer of 43 the last of the B-26’s were with the 70th and then flown to Australia for deposition. Michael Hanson
Michael, you are right. The 38thBomb Group, 69th, 70th, 71st Bomb Squadrons and the 15th Recon Squadron were equipped with B26’s November 1941 whilst at Jackson, Miss.

In May 1942 the 69th and 70th Bomb Squadrons received orders to fly to the Pacific with their B26’s, the 71st and 15th remaining in the USA. All the time the 69th and

70th Bomb Squadrons spent in combat they acted independantly until Jan 1943 when assigned to the 42nd.Bomb Group. The 42nd Bomb Group received B26’s January 1942 and

all squadrons trained on them. However, these were swapped for B25’s before they entered combat June 1943. Trevor Allen, Historian, B26.COM

Date:
3/3/2004
Time:
6:39 AM

Nels Cassano BombGp: 323 Squadron: 453 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I gave the B26 the name of Truman’s Folly because at one time the Truman Committee

condemned the plane and suggested the Army Air Corp stop ordering the b26. After it went into service for 2 1/2 years in the European Theatre during the war it ended up

with the best record than any other bomber in Europe. During this period, they were taking movies of combat crews and me and we were scheduled to go to the States on a

bond drive. In the meantime, President Roosevelt died and Truman became President. The bond drive was cancelled and I was asked to remove the name from my plane, but I

refused. It was very gratifying to see the airplane go on 177 missions and come back every time. I replaced 5 engines on Truman’s Folly during this period, due to air

time on the engines. I was there when an armament man was in the nose of the aircraft and flicked the wrong switch and the 2000 pound bomb glanced off Mr. Brainard’s

shoulder. It could have been very serious. Lucky guy!

I was rewarded a Bronze Star Medal for maintenance for the air plane going on 50 missions in a row without any mechanical problems. No clusters, even though It went out

177 times with out a problem.” I will send you a picture of me and Truman’s Folly. Nels Cassano

Date:
3/2/2004
Time:
9:37 PM

Leslie Tenold BombGp: 322nd Squadron: 451st Years: ALL Class: 42-G Location: Lake Charles, LA. Comments: I was the Squadron Operations Officer for the 451st Bomb

Squadron.

Date:
3/2/2004
Time:
6:52 PM

Dear Mike: May I ask you to let me contact Mr. Carol Logsdon? I saw the capture of his uncle James Logsdon on the 5th November 1944, near the Brenner line. I’d like to

tell him about that event. I’d be very grateful for your answer, The Best Wishes, Odorico Tonello, North Italy
Dear Mr. Tonello, thank you for writing. I am happy to forward your comments to Mr. Carol Logsdon. First I request from you an outline of what you will say to him. I

will forward your outline and request that he contact you directly. Regards, Mike Smith
Dear M. Smith: Thank you for your answer-To Mr. Carol Logsdon I’d like to tell that: I’ve been living in North Italy on the line of the Brenner since I was born. At

that time I was 12; at about 11 o’clock of the 5th November 1945 I saw the B26 fall down, piloted by his uncle. The craft was alive, far from the Box and pursued by two

German plane (caccia one engine) I’ve some facts to say Marauder shot down was the ship of the 320 BG, 444 BS, and German crafts were two Messerschmitt 109 driven by

Italian pilots, whose Commander, Ugo Drago, I’ve known, still living in Roma Italy. The craft fell down in a small valley. (2-3 Km from the town) without any damage to

people or houses. 3 Pilots dead in the fall-3 other people threw himself with the parachute-2 of them survived (one was helped to escape, the other was captured by

German- The third was found dead after about a month, whose name may be Henric MacMahon- The captured Pilot I’m quite sure was James Logsdon- I saw him taken in

motorcycle by Germans to Hospital, then to larger in Bolzano an then to Germany. I still have many pieces of that Marauder as souvenir. I’d like to ask news about his

uncle farm prisoner in Germany until June 1945- I’d be available to any his question about.- I’d also tell Carol, if he comes to Italy, I’ll be glad to meet him and,

likely take him to the exact place of the tragedy. That, Mr. Smith, I’d like to tell Carol, for my living memory of that event, for historical interest, and for my

gratefulness to USAF, that had so much part in the fight for our Freedom. Best wishes- Tonello Odorico, Italy
Dear Mr. Tonello, thank you for your kinds words and sharing your personal feelings. I am happy to assist. I ask your permission to place your email in the B26.COM

guest book. I believe your story should be read by all B26.COM visitors. Is that acceptable to you? Best to you, Mike
Yes, Mike: I’m available to let you place my email in the B26.COM guest book, as you ask me. Tonello Odorico, Italy

Original Message:
Name: Carol Long
Date: 26 Jun 2003
Time: 16:21:05
Comments:
I am curious about my Uncle James Logsdon whom was a B-26 pilot stationed in Sardenia and Corsica. He was in the 12th AF #20th BG 444th BS. He was shot down Nov 5th

1944 over Italy on a bomb run to Germany and taken prisoner. He was taken to Sagon Germany where he was held until the Americans overan Germany in June. Can you send me

on a search to find out about the mission. Your help is greatly appreciated thank you very much. Carol

Date:
3/2/2004
Time:
2:29 PM

BombGp: 394th Squadron: 585th Location: Near Le Mans / France Comments: Dear Friends, Excuse my bad english. I am a French man old of 48 years. I make some searchs

about the airmen allied who dear in my départment around the town of Le Mans. At 200km West of Paris. I search a crew of Bomber, perhaps B26. I know that one airman:

HEMETER Van B. Staff Sergeant – 34624XXX from Mississippi. Dead on August 9, 1944. 585th Bomber Squadron/394th Bomber Group. The number of plan can be 42-96101 and the

MACR can be 7847.. I not sure. Is there some people who can help me? About the crew, the mission, the plane, the friends and the family of these heros? Thank you very

much. Very sincerely and so later. With all my love for your country and for the Veterans. Jacky EMERY, La Chapelle Saint Aubin – France.

Date: 9th August 1944 42-96080 was hit by flak, crashed and exploded in vicinity of Fresnay, France.
Crew; 2.Lt Charles L Kee, 2.Lt Frank W Ramsey, 2.Lt Sam Singer, S/Sgt Van B Hemeter, S/Sgt Milton P Stoll, S/Sgt William L Nix. Trevor Allen, historian, B26.COM

Date:
2/29/2004
Time:
7:15 PM

Donald Frisbie BombGp: 394 Squadron: 586 Years: 1942-1945 Class: 43B Location: Stockton AAF, CA Comments: Reference message posted by Morgan Ferris 2/17/2004. I grew

up around San Bernardino, CA and went through pilot training with Lloyd (Speed) Ferris. We graduated in Class 43B at Stockton AAF, Calif. on 6 Feb. 1943. I was sent to

Avon Park AAF, Florida where I flew B-26’s as an instructor pilot for 18 months with the 336th Bomb Group at Avon Park, MacDill AAF and Lake Charles AAF, LA. before

joining the 394th Bomb Group in France and flying missions in the B-26. I believe that Lloyd Ferris went to Barksdale AAF, LA and flew B-26’s there. I never heard

anything about him after we left Stockton. I have class books from Primary and Basic schools with his picture, but that is all. Donald L.Frisbie

Date:
2/29/2004
Time:
6:34 PM

Fred Davis BombGp: 386 Squadron: 555 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Since I flew the last mission on May 3, 1945, I thought you might be interested in my

mission #36 at Stod, Czechoslovakia.

Mission no. 36 – Stod
May 3, 1945

The weather has been very bad the past few weeks–causing us to be grounded almost a week at a time. There doesn’t seem to be much need for our bombing now–It looks as

if the Germans are “fini”. We have been briefed for this target about a dozen times but each time the mission has been “scrubbed” for one reason or another.

Today we went out under a new PFF technique called “SHORAN:. We made the run into the target without any trouble at all — No flak or fighters. Bombs went away on time

and from our radar equipment it looked as if the bombing was good.

This will probably be the last mission I will fly over Germany for it seems only a matter of days before the Germans will sign an “unconditional surrender”. The German

Armies are in complete “disorder”– I will not be surprised at all if we learn of a surrender in the next few days.
The last Martin B-26 Marauder mission was flown by the 1st Pathfinder Squadron when 8 of their B26’s led 130 Douglas A26’s of the 386th, 391st, 409th and 416th Bomb

Groups to the Stod Ammo plant in Czechoslovakia on May 3, 1945. Trevor Allen, historian, b26.com
OutStanding! Thank you Mr. Davis, for helping us tell the story of Marauder Men! Let’s hear from someone in the 22nd Bomb Group who flew in the first Martin B-26

Marauder on April 5, 1942. Launched from Garbutt Field, Australia the B26’s staged through 7 mile drome near Port Moresby, New Guinea to strike the Japanese base at

Rabaul, New Britain. MS

Date:
2/28/2004
Time:
6:43 PM

Toivo W. Piippo BombGp: 322 Squadron: 449 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My grandfather recently passed away, his name was Lt. Col. Toivo W. Piippo. He piloted

67 missions in the B-26 from England to Germany, mostly unescorted daylight bombings, early in the war. He earned the DFC along with many other awards. I was very close

to him and simply wanted to pay my respects to him and all the other B-26 pilots/WWII vets out there. He was the very first kid drafted from his town of Astoria,

Oregon. He gave up a scholarship from Oregon after his National Championship victory in 1939. After he landed on his 67th flight he was very shook up. He came to my

home town, Richland, WA., and started a basketball program which flourishes to this day. Also, he had a gymnasium named in his honor and did many more great things for

our community. I grew up down the street and we were basically best friends. I’m his oldest grandson and we had a great relationship and friendship through athletics.

I appreciate your website and the recognition given to all you deserving men. He told me a few combat stories which help me try to comprehend the battles all you men

persevered through. I’ll try to send a letter to your friend you wrote to me about. Sincerely, Scott T. Piippo

LINEAGE. Constituted 449th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 19 Jun 1942. Activated on 17 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 11 Dec 1945. Redesignated 449th Bombardment Squadron

(Light) on 13 Aug 1947. Activated in the reserve on 4 Oct 1947. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949.
ASSIGNMENTS. 322d Bombardment Group, 17 Jul 1942-11 Dec 1945. 322d Bombardment Group, 4 Oct 1947-27 Jun 1949.
STATIONS. MacDill Field, Fla, 17 Jul 1942; Drane Field, Fla, 22 Sep-13 Nov 1942; Rougham, England, 1 Dec 1942; Great Saling, England, 12 Jun 1943; Beauvais/Tille,

France, c. 25 Sep 1944;
Le Culot, Belgium, c. 30 Mar 1945; Honau/Langendiebach, Germany, Jul 1945; Fritzlar, Germany, Sep 1945; Clastres, France, Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 9-11 Dec 1945.

North East Mun Aprt, Pa, 4 Oct 1947-27 Jun 1949.
AIRCRAFT. B-26, 1942-1945.
OPERATIONS. Combat in ETO, 17 Jul 1943-24 Apr 1945 Disarmament of German Air Force, Jul-Sep 1945.
SERVICE STREAMERS. None.
CAMPAIGNS. Air Offensive, Europe; Normandy; Northern France; Rhineland; Ardennes-Alsace; Central Europe; Air Combat, EAME Theater.
DECORATIONS. Distinguished Unit Citation: ETO, [17 Jul] 1943-24 Jul 1944
EMBLEM. Over and through an orange disc, a man, feet and lips brown, wearing a yellow loin cloth and goggles blue, green head-dress and arm bracelets, green rings about

the ankles, balanced on right foot on a white cloud formation, outlined blue, in base, and throwing a large gray fire bomb, held aloft in right hand, all in front of a

white silhouette palm tree and two small white cloud formations. (Approved 12 Jul 1943)

Date:
2/27/2004
Time:
6:43 PM

BombGp: 394 Squadron: Years: 1944 Comments: Hello, I am from northwest France and I am looking for informations about the crash of a B-26 Marauder which took place in

my village (Sougé-le-Ganelon, 30 miles northwest of Le Mans) on the 9th of August 1944, at about 7 pm. Amongst the victims of this accident there were Van B. Kemeter

and Milton P. Stoll. I am trying to gather some informations about 4 crashes which happened around the farm of my family. On the 21 of May 1944, a P-47 Thunderblot

crashed in this farm, wich was run by my grandfather at this time. In 1998, we found the pilot (John Balcunas, 36 FG, 22 FS) in Riverside California and received him in

our village where we had organized a ceremony in his honour. I visited John twice in his house in Riverside. John passed away at the begining of September 2001. Now, I

am trying to write down John’s story to keep its memory alive in our area. On that occasion, I would like to record the crashes which took place in the villages aroung

and recall briefly what happened. Many thanks for your help. Loïc Chaumont

Loic, on 9th August 1944 the B26 42-96080 4T-C, 595th Bomb Squadron, 394th Bomb Group, was hit by flak, crashed and exploded 30 miles northwest of Le Mans, France. Crew

was: 2.Lt Charles L Kee pilot; 2.Lt Frank W Ramsey, copilot; 2.Lt Sam Singer, bomb/nav; S/Sgt Van B Hemeter eng/gunner; S/Sgt Milton P Stoll radio/gunner and S/Sgt

William L Nix armourer gunner. Regards, Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
2/25/2004
Time:
8:18 PM

Comments: During Feb. 1944 several 386th B.G. members were on temp. duty with the 391st B.G. to assist them to get organized into the combat mode. The Group scheduled

34 B-26’s to bomb the airdrome located at Cambrai–Epinoy, France on February 25, 1944. One of the 572nd B.S. ships ran out of fuel on final approach and ended up in a

severe crash landing. There were two crew members from the the 386th B.G. flying with that crew. They were Lt. Fred Meier Bombardier and T/Sgt. N. Triantafellu

radioman. Both were okay after the crash. The 391st never made it to the target due to a navigational error. I wish to learn the name and rank of that Pilot, also tail

number of his ship. There were several 386th Crew members assigned for about two weeks in February 1944, then they returned to the 386th B.G. The 391st B.G. was

stationed at Matching Green, England at that time. Chester P. Klier–Historian, 386th B.G. I can be reached at b26.com

Date:
2/24/2004
Time:
11:05 PM

Thanks for passing my email address on to Wynn Anderson. He wrote me about several interesting Holy Moses facts about which I was totally unaware. Like how the aircraft

passed on to Andy Anderson, Wynn’s Dad, and his crew, and about the loss of the aircraft with a brand new crew on their first combat mission in Feb of 1945. This

exchange of additional information by Contributors to B26.COM is a good thing. Medley Gatewood, Moses Gatewood, Pilot, “Holy Moses”

Date:
2/24/2004
Time:
10:53 PM

I live in Germany and research airwar-events in our region (Westerwald). I know Trevor Allen and John Moench from various e-mail communication. Both were very

supportive in a project I had two years ago.

In February and March 1945 the railroad-net on the Eastern side of the Rhine (Westerwald) was heavily bombed by Marauder-formations. While targets were often just named

M/Y it is apparent that many stations, which were at that time vital for the V2-rocket logistics were attacked, e.g. Westerburg (03/13/45 by 397.BG and 387.BG). My

question: Did intelligence assume V2-activity in this area and did these attacks specifically serve in destroying the relevant logistics by cutting the railroad-

connections?

I appreciate your website and thought it might be a good platform for this question. If the concentration of raids on the railroad-net in February and March 45 was part

of a strategic plan against the V-weapons? Best regards, Mario

Mario- The Onslaught against railways, bridges, stations, marshalling yards and tracks in February 1945 was primarily to destroy the German transportation system to

stop or reduce supplies from German industry reaching the armies fighting in the west. This would naturally include V1 and V2 rockets and their fuel. Specific attacks

were later made on the plants manufacturing these weapons as were ammunition dumps and other storage areas. Regards, Trevor Allen, historian, B26.COM

Date:
2/24/2004
Time:
11:07 AM

Russell B. Linger BombGp: 323 Squadron: 456 Years: 3 1/2 Class: 43J Location: George Field, IL Comments: Was co-pilot on Clarence Duplissey’s crew until I got my own

crew about ! Feb ’45. Flew 65 missions from 7 Jun ’44 to 16 Apr ’45. Favorite plane to fly was BUZZIN HUSSY, 040 F for Freddy What I don’t miss the most, COLD WEATHER,

at Laon. Would like to hear from anyone who remembers those days.

Date:
2/23/2004
Time:
7:48 PM

Raymond E. Hedstrom BombGp: 391st Squadron: 575 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My father, Raymond E. Hedstrom, was a co-pilot in the 391st 575th with Ike

Cambier’s crew. He was shot down 12-23-1944 while flying with Donald Sharp’s crew. Is it possible to get a copy of “The return of the Marauder Men” and copies of any

other books that may be of interest to him. He is now 86 and really finds joy in talking about his old group. Thank you, William Hedstrom

Date:
2/23/2004
Time:
7:10 PM

Elwood Francis BombGp: 387 Squadron: 556 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am trying to compile information on the 387th Bomb Group 556th Squadron- My father

Elwood Francis was an armorer – part of the ground crew. I would like to know when and where is the next reunion — also who can I contact regarding this — with email.

Thanks for any help here. Bill Francis

Date:
2/22/2004
Time:
10:19 PM

James Kenneth Brandemihl BombGp: 322 BG Squadron: 451 BS Years: 43-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am interested in finding anyone who flew with the 322nd BG 451st

BS in the 9th Air Force in the UK who can give me information as to where they were stationed in UK between 1943-45. JAMES KENNETH BRANDEMIHL was a TOP TURRETT GUNNER

who flew on the 100th MISSION of the “MILD AND BITTER”. He was injured over France and went to London for medical operations which saved his leg. They used a sheep’s

bone as a graft to save it which was a 100% sucess! I am James Keith Brandemihl, tracing my father’s flying life here in UK during WW2. I would like to know where he

would have been stationed, while here in the UK during 1943-45, and the places he would have visited and stayed in. I and my UK fiancée would like to include them in

our UK tour between now and May 1st 2004!!! Thanking you in advance JKB
See link: 451st Bomb Squadron
LINEAGE. Constituted 451st Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 19 Jun 1942. Activated on 17 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 11 Dec 1945. Redesignated 451st Bombardment Squadron

(Light) on 3 Jul 1947. Activated in the reserve on 9 Aug 1947. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949. Redesignated 451st Fighter-Day Squadron on 24 Mar 1954. Activated on 1 Jul

1954. Inactivated on 18 Nov 1957.
ASSIGNMENTS. 322d Bombardment Group, 17 Jul 1942-11 Dec 1945. 322d Bombardment Group, 9 Aug 1947-27 Jun 1949- 322d Fighter-Day Group, 1 Jul 1954-18 Nov 1957.
STATIONS. MacDill Field, Fla, 17 Jul 1942; Drane Field, Fla, 22 Sep-14 Nov 1942; Rattlesden, England, 1 Dec 1942; Rougham, England, 22 May 1943; Great Saling, England,

12 Jun 1943; Beauvais/Tille, France, c. 23 Sep 1944; Le Culot, Belgium, 6 Apr 1945; Arolsen, Germany, Jul 1945; Clastres, France, Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 9-11 Dec

1945. Reading AAFld, Pa, 9 Aug 1947-27 Jun 1949. Foster AFB, Tex, 1 Jul 1954-18 Nov 1957.
AIRCRAFT. B-26, 1942-1945. F-86, 1954-1955 F-100,1955-1957
OPERATIONS. Combat in ETO, 17 Jul 1943-24 Apr 1945 Disarmament of German Air Force, Jul-Sep 1945.
SERVICE STREAMERS. None.
CAMPAIGNS. Air Offensive, Europe; Normandy; Northern France; Rhineland; Ardennes-Alsace; Central Europe; Air Combat, EAME Theater.
DECORATIONS. Distinguished Unit Citation: ETO, (17 Jul) 1943-24 Jul 1944.
EMBLEM. On an American Indian war shield Air Force blue, a stylized sun with rays Air Force yellow, surmounted in base by a cloud black, with lightning yellow,

superimposed over the center of the shield a peace pipe, stem white, bowl and detail red, feathered white and red, with white smoke rising from the bowl; the shield

over two tomahawks in saltire, the head yellow, the handle black with leather thongs red, feathered white and red. (Approved 2 May 1955.)
Source: Combat Squadrons of the Air Force World War II, Albert F. Historical Research Center and Office of Air Force Historu Headquarters USAF, 1982

Date:
2/21/2004
Time:
1:18 PM

Joe Lazar BombGp: 323 Squadron: 456 Years: 3 Class: 44-2? Location: San Angelo, TX Comments: I Will be pleased to hear from anyone who knew me. I ended up in Reutte,

Austria as part of the 2nd Disarmament Wing of the ninth AF. I think. I think I was the Last Squadron Navigator of the 456th Squadron. Had about 40 missions. I live in

Hopewell NJ for the past 36 years. Joe Lazar.

Date:
2/21/2004
Time:
8:32 AM

Jim Stratton BombGp: 17th Squadron: 95 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Mike, this first letter prompted me to write, for the first time, something of this

part of my life. This first letter is from a man in NJ, directed to our local newspaper, seeking the whereabouts of Jim, my first husband. It is self-explanatory,

pretty much… Select here

Date:
2/20/2004
Time:
8:46 PM

Mark Pritchard Bratton BombGp: 344 Squadron: 497 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: 20 August 1924 to 9 February 2004. …Following Mark’s graduation from Pampa

High School in 1941, he enrolled at Texas University in Austin. When Pearl Harbor occurred in December 1941 he immediately volunteered for duty with the Army Air Corp

as an Aviation Cadet. He was found to be an exceptional pilot and by 1943 he had earned his pilot wings and commissioned a second lieutenant at age 19.
Mark and an Air Corps captain flew their aircraft, a B-26 Medium Bomber from the United States to England. Mark piloted and completed 43 missions over enemy territory

before May 1945 when Germany surrendered… Obituary

Date:
2/19/2004
Time:
4:12 PM

Bill Hornbarger BombGp: 387 Squadron: 557 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My father, Bill Hornbarger, was the 557th squadron navigator, 387th bomb group on Col

Keller’s B-26 named ” Kellers Killer ” There is a photo of the nose art on the site under his name. I have his leather jacket on display at the March Field Museum

Riverside, California and the 557th emblem of a devil with bombs coming out of his cheeks is very distinctive and its in perfect condition on the back of the jacket.

The reason I’m writing is to ask a question, there is another jacket there on display that has the typical small black bombs that stand for missions and the last one on

the list is red. Do you have any idea what that last red bomb stands for ? Thanks, Dave Hornbarger

Date:
2/18/2004
Time:
4:12 PM

Comments: Not a member, but I am doing research for a feature screenplay (movie) that I am writing concerning rescues of US pilots downed behind enemy lines (in France)

during WWII. I am a former naval flight officer (navigator) and remain interested in aviation related stories. I’d heard there were special para-rescue military

personnel who made daring leaps behind enemy lines in France during WWII to retrieve our downed pilots. I’d like to learn more about the specifics of such operations,

as well as any interesting/exciting stories you might like to share. So, any information, weblinks, true stories, etc are welcomed. Thank all of you for your service!

RK Leonard USN (1977-1990)

Mr. Leonard, I am not aware that any such organization existed to rescue downed aircrews over Europe during WW.II. No downed B26 crews were rescued in this manner.

Escapees usually came back through the underground movements and escape lines set up by private citizens. Regards, Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
2/18/2004
Time:
3:20 AM

Comments: I am interested in any B-26 that ditched near Subic bay Philippines. We have found one near the entrance of Subic bay in 72 meters of water which still has

the bombs on board. Anyone with info on this wreck please email me. Thanks. Tim Aukshun, USAF retired.

Date:
2/17/2004
Time:
4:32 PM

James Morgan BombGp: 322 nd Squadron: 449 th` Years: 4 1/2 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I was tail gunner on F/O Gordon Tharpe’s crew. Flew 65 missions and came

home in Sept 1944.

James, June 25th 1944 Tharpe, Peters, Tyler, Mustari, Whitesell and Morgan flew “Flak Bait” to bomb the railroad bridge at Chartres, France. Trevor Allen, historian

b26.com

Date:
2/17/2004
Time:
2:50 PM

Robert Lee Currie BombGp: ? Squadron: ? Years: 1944+ Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My grand father, Robert Lee Currie, flew an A-26 and B-26, but I don’t know much

about his military history. I’ve found half of a picture of him and his crew standing infront of a B-26. The letters on the nose of the aircraft are LE3. I do know that

he did not leave the states. I’m doing the best I can to try to find out the paint scheme of the aircraft and the crew. Billy Currie

Billy, the B26 identity you describe was a Stateside training ship based with the 336th.Bomb Group at Lake Charles, Louisiana. Without any photograph to see its

impossible to give you any colour schemes. Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
2/17/2004
Time:
10:57 PM

Lloyd “Speed” Ferris BombGp: 387 Squadron: 559 Years: 1942-1945 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My grandfather Capt. Lloyd “Speed” Ferris, flew “Speed’s Spook” over

France and Germany. I would like to correspond with anyone who might have known him, or has any information, pictures etc… about him, his crew or plane. Thank you,

Morgan Ferris

Morgan, Your grandfather flew many B26’s whilst with the 559th.Bomb Squadron, but I have no record of the B26 “Speeds Spook”. Do you by any chance have a photo of your

grandfather in front of “Speeds Spook”. Did you know that on February 5,1944 he crash-landed his badly flak damaged B26 on return to his base at Willinghale airfield.

He was not flying “Speeds Spook” that day.
Regards
Trevor Allen
historian b26.com

Date:
2/16/2004
Time:
5:15 AM

Comments: This is a fantastic page….I would like to find information on an aircraft that flew with the 323BG, 456BS. It was the City Of Sherman. Is there any

pictures of this aircraft that exist, or info on the crew. I live in Sherman Texas and several years ago our newspaper did an article looking for the pilot. There was

one picture of the pilot standing next to the nose wheel, and you could see the nose art. I would love to build a model of this aircraft and would like to see some

pictures of her. I know W.W.II was a bit before my time, but All the men and women who served during this period in our history deserve our praise and our honor. They

sacrificed their lives for our freedom. Hats off to all who served. Thanks. Chris Sakowski

Chris, 41-31787 WT-K “The City of Sherman” flew 137 combat missions from February 1944 to May 1945. Regards, Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
2/16/2004
Time:
3:58 AM

James C. Houston BombGp: 22 Squadron: 2nd & 19th Years: 1942-1945 Class: 42-I Location: Victorville AAF Comments: I was sent to Australia in July 1942. I was assigned

to the 2nd Squadron of the 22nd Bomb Group. When all the remaining B26’s were concentrated into the 19th Squadron, I chose to transfer to the 19th Sqd and stay with the

B26s. I flew 35 missions out of New Guinea. Left the Group on Dec.25,1942. Went to Sydney to wait for orders to go home. I was married while in service, had 3 children

was divorced in 1959, and remarried in 1960.

Date:
2/14/2004
Time:
7:03 PM

Lou Rehr BombGp: 323rd Squadron: 456th Years: 1941-1945 Class: 42B Location: Kelly Field Comments: Veterans and their families should know about the Veterans History

Project sponsored by the Library of Congress. See the link below. http://www.loc.gov/folklife/vets/ Commissioned by Congress in 2000, they are seeking interviews,

photos, diaries, and they provide a beautiful kit of materials to guide you. We have chosen to leave our manuscript, photos, letters and all war related material to

this Veteran’s History Project. The Library of Congress has expertise in handling documentation, and they promise to maintain everything in acid-free folders and a

fireproof/temperature/humidity controlled environment. They will also work with local libraries if you want materials kept closer to home. The packet explaining the

process is available by contacting email: vohp@loc.gov. Also from May 27 to Sept 7, Washington DC is celebrating the “greatest generation” including the dedication of

the new World War II memorial over Memorial Weekend. See this link. http://www.washington.org/americacelebrates. The Rehrs, Louis and Carleton “Marauder Memoir of a

B-26 Pilot in Europe in World War II”

Date:
2/14/2004
Time:
5:07 PM

Hermann Paul Brueggeman BombGp: 394th Squadron: 584th Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My great uncle (Hermann Paul Brueggeman) died on Dec 23, 1944 when his

plane crashed over Rommersheim, Germany. He was a togglier on plane 42-96061, 394th/584th (“Heaven’s Above”). Three other men died in the crash (FE Riegner, TJ Bell, JH

Mendelsohn), two survived (LD Folwell and WE Voormis). I have the deceased personnel file, but am looking for any other info I can find… merely out of curiosity. If

the two survivors are still alive, I would like to talk to them. Any help you could provide me would be very much appreciated. Thanks. Steve Bachman

Date:
2/13/2004
Time:
3:20 PM

John B. Mc Grath BombGp: ? Squadron: ? Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Please advise if my father in – John B. Mc Grath – was a pilot of a B-26 plane in WW2. I

think he flew the B-26 in No. Africa and then in India/Burma/China. I do not have any other information than that as he did not talk about his war time experiences.

Pls. review and advise. Thanks for your interest, Mike James

Date:
2/13/2004
Time:
11:32 PM

George Croote Pilot, SAAF. You will be interested to know that the South Africans had five squadrons of Marauders in Italy. Three wing was desert Airforce consisting

of 12, 21, 24 and 30 Squadron. 25 Squadron was part of the Balkan Air Force. Thank you for your interest. Kind regards, George Croote
Finally, we get representation from the SAAF! Thank you George! MS

Date:
2/12/2004
Time:
3:59 PM

Harold Dorsen BombGp: 17th Squadron: 432nd Years: 1943-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: To Earl Willoughby, I was in Corsica from Oct.45 to Nov.45 when we moved up to

Dijon, France.Were you ground Crew? Do you know Joe Milburn? I was Air Crew. Harold Dorsen

Date:
2/11/2004
Time:
6:40 PM

Moses J. Gatewood BombGp: 397 Squadron: 597 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: In visiting the B26.com site today, I was pleased to see your plug for more

dedication pages for Marauder Men of WW II. Here are a few images of my Dad. I’ll send more. Thanks, R. Medley Gatewood

Date:
2/11/2004
Time:
9:15 AM

Lucien Petren BombGp: Squadron: 10th tow target Years: 1944 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am looking for any information on my dads service years. He told me he was

in the 4th air force with the 10th tow target on detached service. I was told he had 498 hours flight time and that he was a mechanic as well. I realize that

information on a tow target group in California (Chino) will not have near the amount of info as a combat group. I cannot find anything on unit history. I am waiting on

personnel record from NARA but any links to the group he was a part of would be great. My dad flew the marauder but I believe he was primarily a mechanic. he did go

to radio school in KC. there are pictures of his group in a wide picture as well as pictures of nose art he took. He has told me that you had to come in hot to land. He

said he had 498 hours on the plane and he was just a few hours short of commercial pilot requirement. I have to get back to him but I believe the 10th tow target group

detached service provided targets in air for gunnery practice. He went to several bases in California. he has read the B-26 books I have given him with great interest.

will have to look for pictures. Eric Petren

Date:
2/10/2004
Time:
7:00 AM

I thought you might find the following on interest: Our nearby town of Bishops Stortford has done a mural of the history of Bishops Stortford, on a panel is featured a

B26, the only aircraft on the whole mural, now I think that IS something. The American 9th flew from nearby Little Easton, did you know there is a chapel within Little

Easton Church, dedicated to the American Airmen who flew from Little Easton. I attached a photo of one of the stain glass windows. Thanks, John Meyer

http://www.bishopsstortford.org/mural.htm

Date:
2/9/2004
Time:
5:35 PM

Michael G. Goold BombGp: Squadron: RAF Years: 1942 -1944 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: As an old guy who flew B 26’s in North Africa, I only ferried them to the

squadrons. To land one of these babies and to walk away from it, you felt you had done a days work. A fine airplane indeed.

Date:
2/9/2004
Time:
10:21 AM

Robert R. Nehmer BombGp: 559 Squadron: 387 Years: 1940-44 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My grandfather flew as a radio gunner on the Booger Red II up until it’s last

mission on 23Dec1944. I am trying to find out any info that I can about the crew that he is standing with in front of the plane with.
This note is in answer to a question from the grandson of T/Sgt.Robert R. Nehmer. T/Sgt.Robert R. Nehmer was radio/gunner on “Booger Red II”, tail number 41-31668. He

flew over the North Atlantic to England in June 1943 with 1st Lt. Charles B. Skipper, pilot; 2nd Lt. Clemens L. Syverson, co-pilot; 2nd Lt. Jay Hatton, Navigator-

Bombardier; S/Sgt. James D. Ashley, Engineer-Gunner; S/Sgt. Alton S. West, Gunner; and passenger S/Sgt. Hubert R. Nylen. These are very likely the crew members he was

standing with in your picture. Arnold Thompson

Date:
2/8/2004
Time:
5:46 PM

George E. Johnson Jr. BombGp: 397 Squadron: 597 Years: ’44 &’45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I believe this is the airfield my grandfather flew out of in 1944, prior

to flying out of France. His name was George E. Johnson Jr., 2nd Lt. and co-pilot of a B-26 Marauder named the Milk Run Special. Although my grandfather passed away

nearly four years ago, I was proud to see these things on the web as I feel pages such as these honor the memory of all who fought and won and lost for our great

nation. Respectfully Yours, Brian Jacobson

Date:
2/8/2004
Time:
4:37 AM

Comments: As a middle-aged Norwegian interested in the B-26 history too; I found an article at B26.com referring to a 344th BG D-Day mission: Bob Witty. Excerpt from

this story: “I was to fly this mission as Command Pilot in the copilot seat with the lead crew, a be-medalled outfit which had led the Group again and again and was a

typical polyglot American bomber crew under the command of Squadron Commander Jens Norgaard who had trained them since their fledgling days at MacDill Field in Tampa.

The crew consisted of a Norwegian, two Jewish lads, two Irish, a Pole and a Hungarian.” I suppose the Norwegian was Mr. Norgaard. After what I have learnt so far, there

were not any Norwegians among the US B-26 crews in UK (refugees from Norway), but there might of course have been second generation Norwegians among them, whose parents

had immigrated to USA. Norwegian Spitfire-pilot’s from 331 Sqd. and 332 Sqd. escorted both RAF and USAF-bombers, and as one 332 Sqd. writes in his last book: USAF-

pilots wanted “The Norskies on top” when flying “daisy missions”. If any one of you has more information about about the above mentioned story and eventual Norwegian

B-26 crew members, I will be happy to learn about this.
My contribution will be a scan of a 17th BG Marauder named Reddy Teddy. This was the only B-26 with B/N 13. Ronald Macklin remember having seen this plane (his BS), but

do not recognize the person on photo. So there is an unsolved question here, too. Best regards, Alf Egil Johannessen/NORWAY
Mr. Johannessen, Lt. Col. Jens Norgaard was indeed a third generation Norse. He commanded our 495th Squadron and had a most outstanding record in WWII. Bob Witty

Date:
2/7/2004
Time:
8:40 PM

Kenneth Kalt BombGp: 454 Squadron: 323 Years: 1943-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am trying to locate surviving members of the 454 Bomb Group who might remember

my father Kenneth Kalt from Brooklyn, New York. His identical twin brother Norman Kalt was also in the 454th. Thank you. Ronald Kalt

Date:
2/7/2004
Time:
5:31 PM

Robert T Pratt BombGp: 17th Squadron: 37th Years: 44-45 Class: J-43 Location: Lake Charles, LA Comments: Just wanted to hear from any other members of my squadron, if

possible.

Date:
2/7/2004
Time:
1:23 PM

Mathew Pusateri BombGp: 387th Squadron: 559th Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: To Sharon Leeszer – My uncle, Mathew Pusateri, was the pilot of the airplane that

your father was on December 23, 1943. I have a copy of the Missing Aircrew Report (MACR) #11482 which contains a statement from an eyewitness, Warren Wade, and a

detailed map of the route the crew was on that day. They departed from Clarese, France that day and were on a mission to bomb the Mayen RR Bridge. If you would like a

copy of this, I would be happy to forward it. Regards, Michele Pusateri Nichols.

Date:
2/3/2004
Time:
8:00 PM

Joe Kurill BombGp: 387 Squadron: 557 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am looking for any information on Joe Kurill, flew 68 missions as a bombardier with the

557th BS. I have an old scrap book with pics of nose art, tents, people etc… Also have his original records. He was my father in law. Any contact would be

appreciated. If I may, I have one more request regarding Joe Kurill. One picture has a crew and on the back the names: Brinson crew, Goon nav, Zerhing co-pilot,

Martin TG, Levitan Radio, Wise Engineer. Another pic has Biggs, Puppie, Oukie, Wise, Kurill, Martin. The words also have Rough Riders on the back. A pic of Ruffels and

lots of B-26s in flying formation, some dropping the goods. I’m looking for any recollection of Joe Kurill for the family. Thank you……..Bob Bost

Date:
2/3/2004
Time:
12:17 PM

Irving (Isreal) Bunes BombGp: 391 Squadron: Years: 42 -25 Class: 42 Location: MacDill Comments: This was my father Irving (Isreal) Bunes Flight engineer and tail gunner

in a B26.

Date:
2/3/2004
Time:
8:20 PM

Anthony (Tony) Brenk BombGp: Squadron: Years: Class: Location: Comments: Hello, I am looking for any information on my dad’s uncle : Anthony (Tony) Brenk I know he was

a tailgunner in a B-26 and I think he flew 65 missions. I know he was shot down twice. One bellied in and the other by parachute. If anyone has any information as to

what bomb group he served with or other crew info please set me know. Thanks, David Kucera

Date:
2/2/2004
Time:
6:29 PM

Bob Carden BombGp: 17 Squadron: 37 Years: 43-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am Bob Carden and flew from Dijon France. Does any one know about Salshanskie (sp)?

He lived with me in the same tent at Dijon. He was a parachute rigger, THE BEST I have been told. I have been to some of the 17th reunions but failed to locate him.

Date:
2/1/2004
Time:
1:00 PM

Clyde E. Smith BombGp: 344 Squadron: ? Years: 1944-1945 Class: 44F Location: Marfa, Texas Comments: co-pilot Several planes, including N3C Charlie Flew 41 missions

From Pontoise, France & Charleroi, Belgium. Posted C/O His Grandson

Date:
1/31/2004
Time:
7:39 PM

Edward H. Lynch BombGp: 386 Squadron: 555 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Outstanding web site! I will add a dedication page.

Date:
1/31/2004
Time:
6:26 PM

My dad passed away last March, he was a Navy W.W.II veteran who served in the Pacific. Thank you ever so much for your site. I was missing him terribly today and your

site was a great help to me. On your site you listed that need information on Navy US Training. My dad was a Radar/Navigator Operator on a B26. I thought he called it a

“Privateer” not a Marauder, my apologies if I have the wrong plane. What I know about my Dad’s training is that he went to Oklahoma State and then on to the King Ranch

in Texas, where he learned how to use the Radar. My dad grew up in Minnesota on a farm. He enjoyed hunting and fishing. I remember him telling how much he enjoyed his

time on the King Ranch since he would watch the flocks of birds come in on the radar. He shipped out and was stationed at a variety of locations in the Pacific,

predominately at Quadulane (?).
He was given a medical discharge after the plane he was in very shot up pretty bad. The pilot almost made it to the runway but couldn’t hold it. My dad was in the back

sitting near the bomb-bay doors. The pilot, knowing that he was going to crash into the jungle, opened the doors and my dad spilled out onto the beach. He was in the

hospital for quite awhile, but I’m very grateful to the pilot.
Thanks again for all the work you do to keep these memories alive, Steve Krause
Steve, you are welcome at B26.COM. All Marauder Men are invited to add a dedication page to the web site. MS

Date:
1/30/2004
Time:
2:04 PM

Charles Z. Breaux, Jr. BombGp: 319th (?) Squadron: ? Years: 1943-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I’m looking for someone who knew and served with my father C.Z.

Breaux in the AAF during WWII. He died in May, 2003. He was a radio operator on the B-26 in the European ETO. He was attached to the 42nd bomb wing, but I don’t know

the bomb group or squadron. The bomb wing was awarded the French Croix de Guerre avec Palme for an allied offensive in Italy which began on May 11, 1944. He served in

North Africa around Kasserine Pass, Italy at Kappa de Keno (not sure of spelling) air base and Capri air base and was in the invasion of Southern France. If anyone out

there can help me I would greatly appreciate it. Cathy Breaux

Date:
1/30/2004
Time:
8:08 AM

Jim Farrell BombGp: 322 Squadron: 449 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Great web site. I am the son of Jim Farrell, the original pilot of Flak Bait. Your

pictures and references to my father and his crew are greatly appreciated, however, you have misspelled his name. Thank you. Tom Farrell

Date:
1/30/2004
Time:
2:36 AM

Comments: What a fascinating site especially as I have been making a video-film and DVD about Essex, England and have included some scenes and sequences of the now-

empty Matching Airfield. The 40-minute programme – “Essex – Living with the Past” – is a look at Essex today with references to the past, especially the part played by

the US squadrons who served here during World War 2. Many of the older residents still remember the warmth and optimism of the young men who came over from America to

help us in the battle against the Nazis. My programme has just been released and is raising a lot of interest. Copies are available for anyone who contacts me. I am now

considering doing a follow-up movie, this time looking at all the US bases in Eastern England and telling some of the stories of bravery and loyalty from those days of

60 years ago. I want to hear from anyone who has a story to tell and a memory of those times. I shall be going with my camera crew to look at the places today, the

villages, the pubs, the countryside, the towns, the old airfields and, of course, talk to anyone here who can remember when “The Yanks Came”. Thank you and I hope you

can help me. David Williams, UK

Date:
1/26/2004
Time:
4:51 PM

Capt. Homer T. Wentz BombGp: 386th Squadron: 555th Comments: Hello Kathy: Capt.Homer Wentz was the pilot of “THE YANKEE GUERRILLA 134946 YA-L. His co-pilot was killed

July 28, 1945 when the plane he was flying in crashed into the Empire State Building. You can read the story I wrote about your father-in law’s plane on my web page

listed below. At present there are 88 stories along with photos at the end of some. Also 12 pages of photos, and 80 bomber formation diagrams. You will find Homer Wentz

listed on many of them. In all there are 180 items you can click on. Tallyho. Chester P. Klier–Historian 386th bomb Group.

Date:
1/25/2004
Time:
5:55 PM

Frank P. Carrozza BombGp: 344 Squadron: 495 Years: 1944 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Carl Carrozza for my dad Frank. Mr. Allen Here is some information about my

dad, Frank P. Carrozza. He flew in the Shopworn Angel 295917 Y5-J 495 344BG. His pilot was usually LT. LYONS PILOT or LT. SHEPERD. My dad’s mission diary is posted at

http://www.geocities.com/b26carrozza. I also interviewed him and included his statements as links to the diary. You have posted a dedication by Bob Witty. In it Bob

remembers his “This is it.” Announcement at the D-Day mission briefing. Dad told me about that day. Of course memory fades….he told me it was Colonel Vance that said

it….I reminded him of the error today. I have tried to piece together the history of the Shopworn Angel after my dad finished his 65 missions. I learned how then

Captain Clay belly landed the plane. See below serial code bs bg aircraft name pilot name 295917 Y5-J 495 344 Shopworn Angel Brennan, Thomas, Capt. His info said it was

Shot down by Flak, Germany Feb 14, 1945 Less than an month after my dad left! The trouble is, I also have conflicting information that the same plane crashed or was

shot down when piloted by Henry Woodrum. I heard something about a rescue of part or all of the crew perhaps by French underground. I even saw a picture of some sort of

plaque dedicated to the aforementioned incident. I received the photo third hand and I have no idea where the plaque is or what kind of display is behind it. Do you

have any information regarding any of this? Please feel free to use any of the images or information on my dad’s web page. I also have with me the prewar addresses of

the men listed on the rosters. I can also make this information available to you if you need it. I would like to set up a dedication page on the B26.com site. Tell me

how to proceed. Alternatively you may want to set up the page yourselves using items from the webpage mentioned above. Carl Carrozza

Date:
1/25/2004
Time:
2:13 PM

Lewis G. McDonald BombGp: 17th Squadron: 37th Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Hello. I’m searching for info about my uncle– Lewis G. McDonald who was a pilot

in the 17th B.G, 37th Squadron. He flew a mission against the Angitola RR bridge on August 9, 1943 and apparently was shot up badly, but managed to bring the plane back

and crash landed. He survived (retired on disability) and lived until last month but would never talk about what happened. Can anyone tell me more? I’d like to

understand more, but we just could speak to him about it. Gary McDonald

Date:
1/25/2004
Time:
8:08 AM

Gerritt Pruim Comments: Sir I am looking for information an Uncle of mine that was killed on March 12 1943. His name was Gerritt Pruim. He was a Sargent in the 12th.

Air force, 42nd. Bomb Wing, 432nd. Bomber Squadron of the 17th. Bomber Group. I believe that my father said that he was a tailgunner. That is all the information that I

have. Maybe you can help. Thank You. Dale Pruim

Date:
1/24/2004
Time:
12:54 PM

R. G. Benner BombGp: 322nd Squadron: 450th Years: 43/45 Class: 43-J Location: Spence Field Comments: Would like to hear from any 450th who participated in night

mission of 7/7/44, to bomb Chateau de Ribaucourt Noball HQ. I was not with my regular crew that night and am hoping to hear from someone who may remember having a

different copilot even though the name would mean nothing. Thanks, R.G.Benner

Date:
1/24/2004
Time:
12:47 PM

Victor D. Rader BombGp: 387 Squadron: 557 Years: 1942-1946 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My first plane was My Gal Friday, named for the wife of my first pilot, Ed

Lowther. I was the crew chief and lost her on it’s 103 mission. Crew survived. Another plane that I was crew chief on was named Ruffles, pilot was Bill Richardson. This

plane flew until the end of the war, ending with 87 missions.

Date:
1/22/2004
Time:
11:16 PM

Dalton Charles (Chuck) Kruse BombGp: ? Squadron: ? Years: 1941-1945 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Hi I am the Son: Dalton c. Kruse, Jr. I am a Pilot/Captain for

American Airlines. My Dad got me interested in flying and he is gone now but my desire to find more info on his B26/W.W.II past has brought me here, just trying to find

info on the B26. He never talked much of his duty in the Army Air Corps. Or maybe I just never asked the right questions. But in any case I would like to find out more.

There are a few things I do know about him that may help someone remember him and possibly give me more info about his war years in Europe. He was from Palatine, IL.

and graduated from high school there in about 1929. He played football, basketball and wrestled in high school. He had two brothers, Howard”Bud”,and Harry. They both

were in the Army in Europe also. Their Dad, my Grandfather owned an auto garage, selling and repairing cars in Palatine, IL. My Dad was stationed at McDill AF, FL.

prior to being sent over to England. At McDill he was a Aircraft Maintenance. Instructor with the rank of about SSGT or TSGT. He was sent to England prior to D-Day. His

duty in England is unclear, but I know he flew on the B26, I think as a Flying Crew Chief. He also talked of supervising other mechanics while on the ground in England

and in France. Seven (7) days after D-Day he said he was sent to a base in France. I know he told me the name of the town/village was “Signe”, France, I’m not sure of

the spelling, but that is how it sounded. I have not been able to find it on a map! During his duty in France he was shot down once and bailed out breaking his wrist,

but not captured. It may have been near the base in France. One other time he said they crash landed the B26 and the tail gunner was killed, either during the landing

or at some point during the flight. I have to find his discharge papers so I maybe more specific on his unit. One of his brothers is still alive, Harry and I will see

him soon. When I do I will hopefully find out more of his Bomb Grp and Sqdn. Till then I hope some one is out there who may at least help t begin my info search. Thank

you, Capt. Dalt Kruse
To Dalton Kruse. Your father might have been on A 3 (Advanced Landing Ground) of CARDONVILLE, a small village a few miles from a small town ISIGNY, which was

operational on D-Day +8 but available only to fighter-bombers (South-West from Omaha Beach). If the spelling of ISIGNY is very different from the spelling of SIGNE the

pronunciation is not. Bernard Porquet

Date:
1/22/2004
Time:
2:14 PM

Comments: I worked on B-26s at the G.L. Martin plant in Middle River, Md. and later on B-26s of the 22nd Bomb Group at the Accelerated Service Test Unit, Fairfield Air

Depot,Ohio. Flew on test flights with Lt. Carl Hartly who was the top Army Air Corps Test Pilot for B-26s. He was later killed flight testing a B-26 which I think lost

some of the tail section in flight. Also sailed to Hawaii in 1942 with convoy of 22nd Bomb Group in same convoy carrying B26s which we assembled at the old Hawaiian Air

Depot, I was a civilian working for the AAF. I was a civilian Aircraft & Engine Mechanic during the period I worked on B-26s. Herbert G. Gardiner

Date:
1/21/2004
Time:
4:38 PM

Kenneth E. Smith Jr. BombGp: ? Squadron: ? Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My father Kenneth E. Smith Jr., of Corinth, MS flew as a radioman in B-26’s during

WWII. He died in December 1986 and rarely talked of his days in the war. He did tell my mother that he had been shot down or crashed at least 5 times during the war

while flying in B-26’s. I would like to know if there is anyway to find out more about his B-26 days and the squadrons he might have flown with. Thanks. Kenneth Smith

III

Date:
1/21/2004
Time:
4:24 PM

Edward A. Kennedy BombGp: 387 Squadron: 558 Years: 1943-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I was a enlisted bombardier (togglier) on my 32 mission on January 25, 1945

when we were shot down over Germany. My Pilot was Robert Taylor who gave his life by remaining at the controls so that the crew could bail out through the back window.I

was the last out and the plane exploded. We all became POW’s until the duration of WWII. The 387th has a annual reunion which I attend.

Date:
1/20/2004
Time:
8:10 PM

Loye A Groves BombGp: 441st Squadron: Years: 4 Class: Location: Jeff Bbks, Mo Comments: My name is Larry Groves. My Dad, Loye, died 1976. All I know about his war

record, is what his discharge papers say. He was a T/Sgt Crew Chief. I have a picture of him with other crew chiefs standing next to b-26 miss manchester. I do not

know much more because he would not talk about any thing that happened in ww-2 battles and campaigns; central europe; rhineland; no apennines; so france; rome-arno;

naples-foggia; sicilian; tunisian; decorations and citations; awarded 8 bronze stars for the above campaigns per wdgo #33-40, 1945 unit citation go #179 12th of 28 Sept

44, good conduct medal. Any imfomation would be helpful. Thanks, Larry

Date:
1/20/2004
Time:
2:51 PM

Edward J Kanthack “Eddie” AKA The Old Man BombGp: 391st Squadron: 574th Years: 44-45? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: We finally know for sure! Trevor Allen confirmed

today that JINX and SNAKES REVENGE (serial number 4130510 4L-A) are the SAME plane! And now, I have a photograph of JINX and her crew, including my Dad! YAAAAY! Thanks

to all who have been searching for JINX for me. Now, all of you great people . . . are you up for another challenge? I now have the crew picture, but I don’t know

who’s who. Can you help? Also, do you have pictures of the OTHER side of the plane (the SNAKES REVENGE side)? THANKS SO MUCH and hope to hear from you soon.
Just learned that SNAKES REVENGE was shot down over Ahrweiler on 23 Dec 44. In a story by Bob Mynn which I received from a man in Norway today, “…SNAKES REVENGE with

two chutes emerging. Lt. Matus was watching an FW-190, minus its left wing, curve past at one o’clock high heading for (Lt.)Dale Detjen’s plane. He didn’t see it hit .

. .” An awful end to a ship that brought my dad and his friends home safely time and time again. Linda

Date:
1/20/2004
Time:
2:51 PM

Parker Snow BombGp: 391 Squadron: 575 Years: 1944 Class: 43A Location: MARFE, TEXAS

Date:
1/20/2004
Time:
2:30 PM

Comments: Am currently in Fiji about to dive on the wreckage of a B-26 located in the Mamanuca group about 5 mi. offshore from Lautoka, Fiji. Best I can determine this

is the wreckage of 40-1438. If anyone has additional information I would appreciate hearing from him. Tom Reeves
Tom – this could well be 40-1438 lost en route to Australia, last seen on take off from Canton to Fiji. 2.Lt Stewart Krauss and crew. Trevor Allen, Historian, b26.com
Here we go again! Good luck, Tom. MS

Date:
1/19/2004
Time:
5:59 PM

Frank Burgmeier BombGp: 323 Squadron: 456 Years: 42-45 Class: 43-4 Location: Hondo, Texas (Navigator) Send: send Date: 19 Jan 2004 Time: 20:18:14 Remote Name:

24.92.251.57 Comments: Flew 65 missions with 456th, most of these as lead navigator. Including squadron lead for first mission of D-day. Flew with Major Louis Rehr as

lead on several squadron, box and group leads. Including the infamous December 23rd, 1944 mission which was my final mission but was one of the worst days in Marauder

history. I guess all of us who came home can cite how chance or luck was in their favor. Ours was on the last mission. We were late getting to the target because our

fighter escort was late in our rendezvous. The 397th which proceeded us without fighter escort – got the hell shot out of them – losing ten planes including the lead

ship. We lost only two. Would like to hear from fellow 456’ers. My best regards to all Frank Burgmeier

Date:
1/19/2004
Time:
5:59 PM

Comments: Dane – My grandfather, Donald J. Hudson, was a B-26 co-pilot in the 391st BG. His aircraft was the “Fifinella” , s/n 42-95932. After serving his missions he

returned to the states with the rest of his crew, most of the replacement crew went down with the aircraft in Germany during the Arwheiler mission, Dec. 23rd 1944. The

Fifinella, from reports in recent years, was found 50 years later in a forest… I can’t remember where in Germany. Supposedly, the crash was understandably the final

resting place of most of the crew, but I also had heard a rumor or local farmers salvaging scrap metal off of it over the decades. I am unsure as to the accuracy of

these reports, but I am extremely interested in find out what the fate of the aircraft was in the last few years, assuming these reports were somewhat true. If you or

anyone you know might have information on the Fifinella from when it was found and what happened to it, please reply. Thank you for your time. -Rick P.

Date:
1/19/2004
Time:
7:39 PM

Ralph D. Wilson BombGp: 386th Squadron: 555th Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: This is a picture of my crew and our aircraft. I Flew with the 8th and 9th Air

Force out of England. This picture was taken shortly prior to my returning to the U.S. My unit was the 555th Medium Bomb Squadron of the 386th Medium Bomb Group. It

was commanded by Col. Lester Matlind when we went over to England and was commanded by Col. S. R. Beaty later. Top row: (Pilot) 1st Lt. Ralph D. Wilson, (Copilot) I ‘t

Lt. Bortner (sp?), Nav./Bomb.) I st Lt. Marshall. Bottom row: (Engineer, Top Gunner) M/Sgt. Sleeper, (Waist Gunner)(Unknown), (Tail Gunner) Sgt. Pointer. This B-26

is a B-26C, It was one of the first to have a turret in the tail instead of flexible guns. It had a lot of battle damage, however it was never shot down and finally

wound up in the bone yard for spare parts. As you can see it had flown 50 missions at the time of the picture, it flew a lot more missions after that. I will try to

get some more of my pictures copied for you later. Ralph D. Wilson Maj. Ret.

Date:
1/19/2004
Time:
10:01 AM

BombGp: 322 Squadron: 451 Comments: Researching information on Col. John G. Simpson, killed 20 July 1944, near Nantes, France. Especially interested in the location of

the crash site, survivors and any other information concerning Col. Simpson. Doing this for his Son, a good friend of mine. Planning a trip with his son in 2004 or 2005

to France/Belgium. Thank you. Col. R. B Kirkconell, USAF (ret)
19th July 1944 the B26 piloted by Lt William E Canfield was hit by flak just after bombs away. Left engine caught fire, the plane banked steeply to the left, the left

wing broke away and the Marauder went into a spin and crashed. No survivors were reported. Crew:- Lt William E Canfield, Col.John G Simpson Group Air Execitve

Officer; Lt Hugo E Conforti; Lt James J Burns; S/Sgt Jack H Chidester; T/SgtHamilton J Hofmeister; S/Sgt Wilbur J Hampton; Sgt Ralph V Hehl. Trevor J Allen, historian

b26.com

Dear Trevor, Thanks for the info. My research has raised several questions:
1. if the plane crashed on 19 July, why is Simpson official death reported as 20 July?
2. One account has one good chute and one no chute but Chidester and Hampton are reported as survivors?
3.Where was this mission flown out of?
4. Would you have the email address of the Frenchman that “knows” the location of the crash site?
Thanks for your help.
Ben Kirkconnell

Ben, maybe they found the body on the 20th.Just a guess on my part and probably wrong I haven’t seen this particular MACR, but the 322nd records show no survivors, here

again the records were not always correct and its people like you asking questions that eventually sort the truth out. Mission flown out of Andrewsfield (Great Saling),

Essex county, England. No, I have had no contact with the Frenchman who knows the location of the crash site. Regards, Trevor Allen

Date:
1/18/2004
Time:
11:05 PM

Ernnest C. Peterson BombGp: 391 Squadron: 572 Years: 43-44 Class: 42g Location: Roswell Comments: Tail #811. “Ruthless”. Bombardier Carl Goldschlager. Chapaman: Roy E.

Amey: 33 missions. Flight leader of a flight.
Ernnest, 30th March 1945 hit by flak and bellylanded on one engine by Capt Warren Peterson with 15 gallons of gas in tanks. Trevor Allen, historian, b26.com

Date:
1/18/2004
Time:
5:17 PM

Homer Wentz BombGp: ? Squadron: ? Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My father-in-law was Homer Wentz. Thank you for your great site. Kathy Wentz

Date:
1/18/2004
Time:
2:33 PM

James Vaughan BombGp: 558th Squadron: 387th Years: 41-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: Nice site. My father, Master Sergeant James (Jim) Oliver Vaughan was a Flight

Crew Chief the 387th. He joined the army as poor Georgia farm boy in October of 40. He joined the 558th at MacDill on 11/01/42. He enjoyed the reunions and attended his

last one in 1994 just 2 weeks before he died. When he was in in the hospital I asked him if he wished he hadn’t attended (because he was so weak) but he told me he

wouldn’t have missed it for the world! Anyone have any rememberances of him? He used to talk about a buddy from Michigan named Multerer? Kent Vaughan

Date:
1/18/2004
Time:
1:40 PM

Louis Rehr BombGp: 323rd Squadron: 456th Years: 1941-1945 Class: 42B Location: Kelly Comments: Is there a 323rd Bomb Group Association? We are looking to place a

monument at Samoussy, France, near Laon-Athies Aerodrome, to honor the 323rd BG and its four squadrons, the 453rd, 454th, 455th and 456th. We need contributions from

members and their families and anyone who recognizes the importance of preserving the history of this group and its sacrifices for our freedom. If you are interested in

contributing, the money will be sent directly Mr. Daniel Buret, president De l’Association Franco-Americaine de l’Alsne. This year will mark the 60th anniversary of the

D-Day invasion. Together, we can make this monument a reality in the coming months.

Date:
1/18/2004
Time:
9:18 PM

Comments: I was at Normandy recently & discovered the gravestone of Sgt-John F. La Plante 573rd bomb sqd-391st bomb group March 19th 1944 Vermont does anyone know of

him & what town he was from I have a close up photo of his marker he is buried at the Normandy cemetery & I will try to get it to his family. I am a WWII vet myself.

Sincerely, Johnny Scalf

Date:
1/16/2004
Time:
4:04 PM

Bob Carden BombGp: 17 Squadron: 37 Years: 1944&1945 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am Bob Carden 17th Bomb Gp 37th Bomb Squadron and flew 36 missions from Dijon

France. My first mission was in B-26 C-15 Sr.#42-34929 Battle #30. Nose art on this B-26 was a black Panther “Marauder” above the nose landing gear. On April 18 1945,

on take off, the B-26 blew a tire and crashed. No one was hurt. My CREW- Pilot James C. Rogers ; Co-Pilot Eugene V. Allen ; Navigator John Rothamel ; Engineer Allen

K.Berg ; Tail Gunner Hilbert J. Adank ; Radioman Bob Carden. We flew a B-26G from the U.S.A to England using the Southern rout. I still have my flight record from Lake

Charles to the end of the war and through October 16 1945. My last flight was in a B-26 from Schleceiheim-R-75. Adank and Allen are deceased. I have not had any word

from the rest of the crew in a long time. If any one out there knows any information about Rogers, Berg or Rothamel please let me know. Thanks, Bob Carden
Thank you Bob, you’re the best! MS
Bob, do you know this B26 crashed on take off when a tire blew out April 8th 1945.Lt Rogers was the pilot? Trevor Allen, historian, b26.com

Date:
1/15/2004
Time:
9:05 PM

Mathew J. Pusateri BombGp: 397th Squadron: ? Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am the niece of Mathew J. Pusateri (Buck), who was the pilot of the Front Burner

2 (B-26 LQ4) on December 23, 1944. The plane crashed in Junkerath, Germany. If anyone can provide information about this particular crew, I would appreciate it. Michele

Pusateri Nichols
Michele – December 23rd 1944 the 387th.Bomb Group flew a mission to destroy the Mayen railroad bridge in support of the army.B26 42-95869 TQ-F “The Front Burner II” of

the 559th.Bomb Squadron, on its 93rd combat mission, was one of the B26’s involved. The Group, flying without fighter escort, was attacked by enemy fighters on the bomb

run, and it was then that “The Front Burner II” was shot down crashing near Junkerath, Germany. The crew of TQ-F were: 2.Lt Mathew J Pusatari, pilot; 2.Lt Charles C

Steward, copilot; Sgt John Robinson; Sgt Robert W Phillip; S/Sgt Eckard Munson; Sgt William M Mulligan and Corporal Howard Shweder. Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
1/14/2004
Time:
6:16 PM
Interested in detailed mission list for Harry K. Oholendt, O-XXXX05 432 Bomber Squadron, 17th bomber group medium and any photos of him in 432nd bomb group. Killed in

crash of “Sweet Sue” Feb. 29th, 1944. I have a photo (not sure if he is in there) from Univ of Akron newsletter, a bad copy of the crash and I have the 432nd bomb

squadron logs for February 1944 and articles on the 17th bomb group by Tannehill and one by Turner. I don’t know if crews stayed with one plane or if he was bombardier

on other planes. Mark Oholendt
Mark, it is impossible to give a full run down on combat mission for any particular crew member of the 17th Bomb Group. This is because the daily combat records were

lost sometime after the end of combat missions and have never been found. They may be hidden in some forgotten archive, but as yet no one has seen them Crews would fly

any available B26 on the day of combat so Harry K Oholendt would have flown in various squadron B26’s. Regards, Trevor Allen, historian b26.com
Well, if Trevor says it is impossible then it might be really hard for the rest of us who just want to know a little bit more about the 17th BG Marauder Men. That

said, can the remaining 17th BG guys out there contact B26.COM and get as much information to Trevor Allen as possible? Let’s call this goal the 17th BG 2004

Information Challenge. I’d like to see Trevor answer questions related to the 17th BG. Thank you.

Date:
1/14/2004
Time:
6:16 PM

Richard B. Cockrum BombGp: 387 Squadron: 559 Years: 42-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My was an engineer and gunner on the “Front Burner”. He was S/Sgt. Richard B.

Cockrum. He was in the 559th bombardment sqd, 387th bombardment group. We have a copy of his log book and noticed a gap in his flight log. There are no entries for

5/10/44 until 8/15/44. In his separation papers under “Battles and campaigns it notes he took part in the Normandy Campaigns. Would anyone know why there would be a gap

in the log book, on and around June 6,1944. He was never injured (no Purple Heart). Also the hours logged are sequential. Thanks, Lowell Cockrum
This in responds to LT. Walter L. Pulvers’ note. My father was a engineer and gunner on the Front Burner. As you may or may not know he flew 70 missions. He passed way

in 1997. I’m one of his 6 boys, he also fathered 5 girls. He and mother were married over 50 years.
Lowell, the original crew of The Front Burner were 1.Lt. Norman R Settle pilot; 2.Lt. Stanley M Hughes copilot; 2.Lt. Walter L Pulvers Bomb/Nav; S/Sgt. Richard B

Cockrum Eng./gunner; S/Sgt. John G Govostis radio/gunner; S/Sgt. Richard C Oldakowski armourer/gunner. Front Burner flew 43 missions until February 5th 1944 when

having been hit by flak it crash-landed back at base and was salvaged. Your fathers crew was not flying it that day. The Front Burner II was a replacement and flew its

first mission February 25th 1944. The Settle crew flew this B26 on May 10th 1944 to Oissel,France. Settle next flew this plane on August 6th 1944 to Blois/Bois des

Blois. The Settle crew last flew The Front Burner II on November 21st 1944 to Birgel and on December 23rd 1944 it was shot down by flak on the bomb run. It seems the

entire settle crew were off operations from May 10th to August 6th 1944. Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
1/14/2004
Time:
3:52 PM

L.I. Kanthack BombGp: 391st Squadron: 574th Years: 44-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: “SNAKES REVENGE” was the other name painted on the plane called JINX. It’s

serial number was 41-35010 (I think.) The Snakes Revenge side of the nose had a boot and a snake on it. Pilot: Lt. Richard Newman. Co-pilot: Lt. Simeon Enzor.

Bombardier: Lt. Norbert Fuhrmann. Gunners: Sgt. James Reeves, Albert Hall, and S/Sgt. Edward J Kanthack (my Dad). Any pictures of this plane and crew out there? Also,

Simeon Enzor gave an interview in 2001. Are you still around, Mr. Enzor? I can’t find you. Please contact me if you can. Linda
Linda, give me the dates of two missions flown by your father in JINX and we will give you the information you want. Snakes Revenge was 41-35010, but no one is yet

certain of JINX’s identity. With your help we can sort this out. Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
1/12/2004
Time:
4:30 PM

Earl Willoughby BombGp: 17th Squadron: 432nd Years: 1941 to 1945 Class: 43B Location: Lubbock, TX Comments: Would like to hear from anyone who served with the above

Grp/Squad when we were based in Djedida, North Africa, Villacidro, Sardenia or Corsica. Am trying to put together my memoirs (about time, right?) and any info or pix

you would like to share would be appreciated.

Date:
1/12/2004
Time:
11:53 PM

Sgt. Henry L. Reichert BombGp: 394 Squadron: ? Years: 1943 – Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I am searching for information anyone would be willing to share on Sgt.

Henry L. Reichert or the crew he worked with in the 9th Air force, 98th Bombardment Wing, 394th Bomber Group. His plane was the B-26 named “The Liberty Run.” I am

unsure as to the designation of his “Bridge Buster” bomber squadron. Thank you in advance.

Date:
1/12/2004
Time:
3:56 AM

BombGp: 394 Squadron: 584 Years: 1944 Comments: I am having a memorial put up to the two crews of a pair of 394/584 B-26’s that had a mid-air over Sussex, England, on 6

June 1944 – D Day. There was one survivor, Lt. Tommy Potts. Anybody know anything of him?? I have all crew names but want to find families in the USA before we proceed

this June with the memorial so time is running short! Can anyone out there help? Andy Saunders.

Date:
1/11/2004
Time:
8:44 PM

John P. Martinson BombGp: 17th Squadron: Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My uncle, Captain John P. Martinson was a B-26 pilot with the 17th Bomb Group. He flew

62 combat missions from April 1944 to April 1945. On January 11, 1946 he was killed in an automobile accident near Concord, NH. My mother and grandparents seldom talked

about him. However, after my mother passed away in 1997, we found a documented history of his military service including combat missions, targets, citations and

pictures. I would be pleased to share this information with anyone who is interested. If anyone knew my uncle or may have flown with him I would be very grateful to

hear from you. Thank you, Jim Wilbur

Date:
1/10/2004
Time:
9:57 PM

Robert Bost BombGp: 387 Squadron: 557 Years: ? Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I have a scrap book of B-26 Pics I would like to have IDd. Thanks…………….Bob

Date:
1/10/2004
Time:
6:44 PM

Comments: My grandfather flew a B-26 in Europe, I believe in Italy. If anyone has any information about his service years please contact me. I am very interested to

know more about him. Stephen Tise

Date:
1/10/2004
Time:
6:34 PM

Raymond “Casey” Hasey BombGp: Squadron: 1st Pathfinders (Prov) Years: 4 Class: 43 Location: Victorville Comments: Do you have any records about the 1st Pathfinders

Squadron (Provisional) of B-26 Marauders? After my first ten missions I served in the 1st Pathfinder Squadron (Provisional) under Capt. Vaner Smith. We flew missions

including D-Day on a B-26 Marauder called the “Weary Lera”. I am now finishing up my Memoirs.

Raymond- yes we do have some information on 1st Pathfinder missions, and if you will tell us about your service with the squadron we would be more than pleased to help

you out. Regards, Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
1/10/2004
Time:
4:15 AM

Comments: 3 pages of information and photographs feature on my website regarding the 391st Bomb Group (M) during 1943/4 and how their English wartime airfield of

Matching Essex appears today. to visit this site go to http://merlinsroared.tripod.com Denis Sharp
Denis- just looked at your site, very nice, keep up the good work. Trevor Allen, historian b26.com
Note: The above web site is slow to load because it is on a web server that is shared by many people, be patient.

Date:
1/10/2004
Time:
1:03 AM

Philip Samuel Walter BombGp: 391 Squadron: ?? Years: 1944 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: My grandfather was a member of the 391st Bomber Division. Philip Samuel Walter

from Lancaster, PA. We celebrated his and my grandmother’s 60th wedding anniversary tonight and got to listen to him tell stories. What a wonderful time and experience

this evening. Just wanted to say thank you to all the brave men who fought and lost their lives in the quest for freedom. Please e-mail if you knew my grandfather!!

Mark Aguirre

Mark- you obviously hold your grandfather in high regard so why not dedicate a page to him here at b26.com. Send us some photos of him, details of his squadron and some

more information on him. What was he pilot, copilot, nav, gunner etc, when did he start his missions, how many did he fly. Regards, Trevor Allen, historian b26.com

Date:
1/4/2004
Time:
2:28 PM

Comments: Hello Ronald Macklin, BombGp: 17th, Squadron: 34th: The 386th Bomb Group flew a total of 409 Combat missions. Our S-2 Officer told me that our Group briefed

over 1,000 missions, some were cancelled before take off, others were recalled while in the air. Check out my web page listed below. Tallyho!

http://www.b26.com/historian/chester_klier.htm Chester P. Klier–Historian, 386th Bomb Group

Date:
1/3/2004
Time:
11:57 PM

George V. Lane, Lt. Col., USAF, deceased Comments: my father, George V. Lane, was a pilot on the b-26, “coughin’ coffin”. He was based out of Tunisia. He had flown

earlier as a fighter-pilot with the Canadians in England. His father, Robert Lane, had flown the b-26 proto-type. George was hit several times and had large amounts of

flak removed. George then flew f-86’s in Korea, after WW2, and then f-100’s in the UK, commanding the 334th fighter sq. I remember seeing the “coughin coffin” as a

little boy in the Wright Patterson museum when dad commanded the 97th fighter sq. there. Keep the greasy side down!

Date:
1/3/2004
Time:
3:33 PM

Comments: My Grandpa, Orval Polsfuss, worked on the line at the Baltimore plant that made B26s. I am looking for information on the plant. I believe he was in charge of

one of the final inspection teams before the planes were turned over to the Army. Edward Hursh

Date:
1/3/2004
Time:
1:23 PM

Bill Royal BombGp: 344 Squadron: 495 Years: ’42-’45 Class: ’42 Location: Buckley Field, Colo. Comments: Just wanted to wish all you terrific Marauder Men a fantastic

year and good health. For you who do not know me, my claim to fame is a commendation from my group commander. It was for not having an abort of my making during my time

with the 495th.

Date:
1/2/2004
Time:
5:10 PM

Comments: My older brother, 2nd Lt. Dan C. Lowe, was a B-26 pilot. He graduated from flight school in 1942 in California. He was assigned to B-26’s and flew Submarine

patrol from Bluie West base in Greenland. He later flew from England and was shot down and helped by the French to evade back to England. He told me that he was

assigned secretly to train Russian pilots in the B-26 in Russia. Do you know anything about this type of mission? Thanks. David Lowe

Date:
1/1/2004
Time:
6:09 PM

Stanley Clements BombGp: 322 Squadron: ? Years: 1942-45 Class: ? Location: ? Comments: I’m writing for my dad, gunner/navigator. He flew 75 missions. Does anyone

remember a village in France called Doudeville or Bouvatille? My father’s crew had engine trouble during a mission supporting the Battle of the Bulge. They crash-landed

(belly up) near this town. Please contact me. Marcy

Marcy, the only crashlanding I can find for a pilot named Wade was as follows. The B26 flown by Capt Warren R Wade, 387th. Bomb Group, 559th Bomb Squadron was

severely damaged by German fighters on December 23rd 1944 and subsequently crashlanded at base. Trevor Allen, historian, b26.com

Date:
1/1/2004
Time:
5:14 AM

TSGT Leo Green BombGp: 17 Squadron: 432 Years: 42-45 Class: 43 Location: LA Comments: Thanks Mike, another great year for Marauder crews, not many of us left anymore.

Read the message board often love it would like to hear more from 17 crews. Leo Green, Tail Gunner/ Engineer

Date:
1/1/2004
Time:

12:01 AM
Happy New Year!

From the B26.COM Team
B26.COM